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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

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■ 



09 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 




Annual 
Report 
1979 




5 02 7 9B' 



Jfn fHcmnnam 

E. Hayward Bliss 
Lena Cavanaugh 




Compugraphic's new facility under construction on Ballardva 
Wilmington's first four-story building 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 62 

Board of Appeals 21 

Board of Assessors 10 

Board of Health 40 

Board of Registrars 13 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 7 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 61 

Cemetery Department 33 

Conservation Commission 51 

Constable 59 

'Council on Aging 56 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 15 

Fire Department 32 

Highway Department 18 

Historical Commission 60 

Housing Authority 57 

Inspector of Buildings 20 

Librarian 37 

Library Trustees 36 

Planning Board 49 

Police Department 30 

Public Buildings Department 39 

Recreation Commission 45 

Redevelopment Authority 50 

Revenue Sharing 119 

! School Committee 68 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 19 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 77 

Superintendent of Schools 71 

Town Accountant 114 

I Town Clerk 14 

jTown Collector 12 

Town Counsel 52 

Town Engineer 17 

Town Manager 4 

Town Meetings & Elections Annual Town Meeting - March 3, 1979 82 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - March 10, 1979 & May 19, 1979 . 83 

Special Town Meeting - May 19, 1979 95 

Special Town Meeting - September 24, 1979 112 

Town Treasurer 16 

Tree Department 19 

Vandalism Committee 67 

Veterans Agent 11 

Water & Sewer Department 34 



1 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 

board of selectmen 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The Town of Wilmington has completed a year of many changes. During 1979 
Wilmington witnessed the expansion of local industry, the increased participa- 
tion and support of recreational and leisure time services, and the fiscal con- 
straints of the Tax Cap. It was a year of citizen participation in the areas 
of vandalism, youth activities and the future of recreational/athletic fields. 

We want to take this opportunity to thank all our citizens who participated in 
community youth and adult activities. Without your volunteer services the 
people in our community would be without sports programs, and other similar 
activities. Also without your participation on Town boards and commissions, 
our government could not function. Without your voice and vote at Town Meeting, 
the wheels of one of the oldest traditions in the United States, open town 
meeting, would come to a halt. 

In 1979 there were various events which require special recognition. The fol- 
lowing are some of the highlights which we would like to acknowledge. 

The Recreation Commission met with continued support in their youth and adult 
programs. The traditional sports leagues, such as basketball, baseball, soft- 
ball and tennis, all grew in the number of people participating. 

The summer concert program was greatly expended and provided an enjoyable eve- 
ning of free entertainment at the gazebo. 

The Rotary Club donated a Universal Exercise Machine to the Town. Several 
Recreation sponsored programs were established to make use of this weight train- 
ing facility. Many thanks to the Wilmington Rotary Club. 

The Athletic-Recreation Committee was formed to find ways and means to improve 
the overall condition of the Town's athletic and recreation fields. These play- 
ing fields are in poor shape from overuse and vandalism. They are in need of 
renovation and repair to insure their continued existence in the Town's athletic 
and recreation program. 

The Vandalism Committee presented their final report to the Board in October. 
The Committee pointed out that vandalism and wanton destruction can be controlled. 
The key element is mutual cooperation between the citizens, police, town govern- 
ment and School department. Crime Watch, a national crime prevention program, 
will be introduced into Wilmington as a result of this report. 

There was a changing of the old guard in two Town departments this year: 

Chief Paul Lynch, who has served the Town well, retired after thirty-one years 
of service as Chief of Police, and Bobby Stewart was appointed as the new Chief. 

Water and Sewer Superintendent, Kenneth Motschman, another long-time faithful 
employee, retired after thirty-three years of service to the Town, and Paul Duggan 
was appointed as his replacement. 

On a negative note, the Town did not escape in its water system the threat of TCE 
(Trichloroethylene) which has spread across the State. The Chestnut Street 



2 



pumping station was closed during the year because potentially dangerous levels 
of TCE were found in the well. 



At a Special Town Meeting in September, an additional $600,000 was approved to 
construct and equip a water treatment plant off Butters Row. It will be designed 
to help remove TCE, as well as other pollutants, from the water supply. 

To contrast the old with the new, the following two events in the business com- 
munity are worthy of special notice: 

Weinberg's Department Store, a long-time Wilmington landmark, was closed, sold 
and torn down to make way for a branch office of the Reading Savings Bank. 

Compugraphic continued to make its mark in the business world by breaking ground 
on a four-story multi-million dollar engineering facility on Ballardvale and 
Route 125. This will be Wilmington's tallest office building. 

The 1979 property tax rate was reduced by $2.00, from $79.00 to $77.00 per 
$1,000 valuation. This was a direct result of a painful budget analysis and 
the Town's desire to live as much as possible within the State's 4% Tax Cap 
on municipal spending. 

In an effort to consolidate Town offices and services, the Town Hall Annex 

was moved from the old library to the Whitefield School. The Engineering, Health, 

Building, Planning and Recreation Departments are all located there. 

Lastly, the 250th Anniversary Committee worked through the year to insure that 
1980 will be properly and festively commemorated. 

We, the Board of Selectmen, want to thank all of you for your active partici- 
pation in community affairs during 1979. We are working as your representatives 
to make our Town a better place to live and work. It is through your continual 
support and confidence in us that we can achieve this goal together. 




Respectfully submitted, 



James F. Banda 
Robert J. Cain 
Aldo A. Caira 
A. John Imbimbo 



Town of Wilmington 

MASSACHUSETTS 01887 



OFFICE OF THE AREA CODE 6' 

TOWN MANAGER 6SB-33II 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

I am amazed to find in this age of heavy inflation that local government and in- 
dustrial and commercial enterprises can function at all with less income and also 
the added burden of energy related cost all at the same time. A candidate for a 
federal level position recently stated that the solution to the sharp and continu- 
ing rise in the cost of living can be solved quite simply. All that is needed is 
to have the federal, state and local government spend less money. What is causing 
these governmental units to spend more money? If you suggest that all governmental 
units freeze wages, will that stop inflation? It would solve a part of the problem 
as long as all public and private enterprises were also ordered to freeze wages to 
include the businesses which produce food, housing, clothing, transportation, medi- 
cal care, entertainment and related services. 

The cost of inflation each year affects every home, every business, every municipal 
government, the County of Middlesex, the government of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts and the federal government of the United States. The upward changes in the 
annual budget reflect the times in which we live and the current and projected rapid 
deterioration of the value of the dollar throughout the country. Most man-made pro- 
ducts and natural resources appear to be gaining in value but it is a complete mirage 
The cost of living index for 1979 showed an approximate 13% increase in the overall 
cost of food, money, heat, gas, clothing, services, and all other consumer goods. 
When and if you sell an item of value which you own, say a house, it appears that 
you have made a large profit, but the profit disappears when you attempt to replace 
that home on today's market or when you attempt to find any other housing arrange- 
ment . 

The message that I wish to convey is that municipal costs are not standing still in 
today's economy and to break even, the rate of increase in spending would have to 
equal at least a 13% increase in the annual budget expenses for the new year instead 
of the 4% cap in spending. For much less than a break-even level, then we must elim- 
inate some municipal services. If this is the wish and desire of the residents, then 
the next decision is which services shall be eliminated or curtailed. Shall it be 
recreation, fire protection, street lights, snow removal and street maintenance, 
rubbish collection and disposal, police protection, the library, or health and prop- 
erty insurance? The decision will need to be a joint decision of everyone who has 
a stake in this community. 

The other main cause of today's inflation rate, is the cost of energy. The increase 
in the cost of fossil fuel products such as asphalt for street maintenance, gasoline, 
oil and fuel oil are beyond reasonable prediction to include the availability of 
purchasing these products in the future. The cost of gasoline in the current fiscal 
year was not adjusted upwards and the mild winter which we are experiencing may make 
it possible to complete the fiscal cycle in the black. The new budget year reflects 
a big increase in cost for gasoline. 

In Wilmington the Public Buildings Department has the responsibility for the mainten- 
ance of school buildings and grounds as well as all other municipal buildings. The 
budget each year reflects a considerable increase in the cost of heating oil for 
these buildings and the bulk of the capital outlay items which I have recommended in 
1980 are designed to conserve the use of heating oil in the future. You should keep 
in mind that these costs and increases in cost are part of your school cost and any 
percentage increases concerning schools should include these costs as found in the 



4 



Public Buildings Department Budget to include the cost for all labor and material 
to maintain the schools and administrative buildings. We hope that it will be 
possible in 1980 to continue the practice of building use consolidation so that the 
less energy efficient buildings can be eliminated. 

We found it necessary during the 1979-80 budget period to make some overall ad- 
justments in the bottom line figures of the total valuation of real and personal 
property which resulted in a year of no growth in the amount of assessable prop- 
erty. The situation will improve to a small degree in the new budget year, but 
the problem of equitable property assessments will not disappear for some time in 
the future. The Town will find it necessary to complete a property reappraisal 
program in conformance with the Sudbury case and the order of the Department of 
Revenue, Commonwealth of Massachusetts. I believe that the Town will be forced 
to comply with a revaluation project by court order in the new fiscal year and 
further delay will only result in additional costs to the residents of Wilmington. 
The revaluation project when completed will then be followed by the new classi- 
fication of various types of property also as promulgated by the General Court. 

The Massachusetts Bureau of Accounts conducted, at our request, a post-audit of 
all town accounts for the year ending June 30, 1979 and issued a "Management 
Report" for the Town of Wilmington. The recommendations of the Bureau have been 
reviewed by my office, the Town Accountant, Robert Peters, and Tax Collector, 
Marion Murphy, and weaknesses in various internal control and accounting proced- 
ures have been corrected to more closely adhere to the generally accepted ac- 
counting principles as outlined by the Auditors. The Auditors pointed out that 
they found many favorable aspects of the Town's operations and accounting system 
and dedicated officials and employees with whom they worked. 

We made an application during 1979 for a federal grant to start a housing re- 
habilitation program to improve the living conditions for some of our elderly 
and moderate income families. The Town was awarded $245,000.00 to undertake 
ffhis project and Buzz Stapcynski, Assistant Town Manager, will be spearheading 
this neighborhood revitalizing program during 1980. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress which has been made over the past year 
is due to the leadership provided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services 
have been of high quality due to the professional attitude of our department 
heads and hard work by our employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all by your presence at the Town 
Meeting. 



Respectfully submitted, 




New Forest Fire Truck 



5 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 1979 - 1980 



Board of Selectmen 



Rocco V. DePasquale, Chairman 
Aldo A. Calra 
James F. Banda 
Robert J. Cain 
A. John Imbimbo 



Term 
Expires 
1981 
1981 
1980 
1982 
1980 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



Lester E. White, Chairman 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr. , Vice Chairman 

Linda T. McMenimen, Secretary 

John Brooks 

James A. Demos 

James D. Tighe 



1980 
1981 
1982 
1980 
1982 
1981 



Superintendent of Schools 



Dr. Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Walter J. Kaminski, Chairman 
Richard D. Duggan, Vice Chairman 
Mary J. Deislinger, Secretary 
Anita H. Backman 
Richard V. Barry 
George W. Boylen, Jr. 
Michael P. Dolan 
Thomas E. Casey 
William E. Hanlon 



1981 
1981 
1981 
1982 
1982 
1982 
1980 
1980 
1980 



6 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - JANUARY 1, 1979 - 1980 



APPEALS, BOARD OF 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 

William A. Caperci 

George C. Robertie 

Neil L. Buckley, Associate 

Joseph P. McMenimen, Associate 

Carroll L. Robbins, Associate 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

Anthony E. Krzeminski, Principal 

Charles P. Lawrenson 

Roy P. McClanahan 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 
Paula O'Brien, Chairman 
Evelyn S. Burke 
Joseph J. Cuoco 
Cynthia L. White 
Hugo W. Wiberg, Jr. 

CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 
Madelon C. Slater, Chairman 
Frankline E. Allen 
Julia A. Fielding 
Mildred E. Neilson 
Kenneth H. Wilson 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Mildred M. Cavanaugh, Chairman 

Willis C. Lyford 

William H. Russell 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Chester A. Bruce, Chairman 
Jacqueline D. Allaman 
Thomas J. McGinley 
Joseph A. Guzzo 
Paul A. Rose 
Joan M. Sadowski 
Donald H. Ugolini 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Irving H. Storms, Chairman 

Lorraine Brozyna, Vice Chairman 

Josephine M. Kelley, Secretary 

Gladys A. Babine 

Wilson J. Belbin 

J. Arthur Bernard 

Rose M. Gatta 

Sheldon F. Maga 

Margaret L. McNeil 

James M. Shine 



1980 
1982 
1981 
1980 
1980 
1980 



1982 
1982 
1980 
1980 
1981 



1982 
1981 
1980 



1982 
1981 
1980 
1980 
1982 
1980 
1981 



1982 
1982 
1981 
1981 
1982 
1980 
1980 
1980 
1980 
1980 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION (continued) 

Herbert L. Fielding 1980 

Ruth M. Harding 1981 

Evelyn T. Kaminski 1981 

William G. Meyers 1982 

Melinda P. Murphy 1982 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Barbara H. Larson, Chairman 1981 

Lorraine C. Brozyna 1982 

George W. Hooper 1983 

Kevin J. McMillan 1980 

Melvin F. Keough 1983 
(Rep. of State Housing Board) 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

E. Hayward Bliss, Chairman 1982 

Shirley F. Callan, Vice Chairman & Sec. 1981 

Bruce F. Conant 1982 

John S. McNaughton 1980 

Evelyn M. Norton 1980 

Esther L. Russell 1981 

PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Richard V. Barry 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 

PLANNING BOARD 

John W. DeRoy, Chairman 1980 

Arnold C. Blake 1983 

William G. Hooper, Jr., Clerk 1984 

Louis A. Maglio 1982 

Kenneth J. Miller 1981 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Paul J. Bova, Chairman 1980 

John P. Cushing, Vice Chairman 1982 

Lorraine M. Hanna 1981 

Larry G. Noel 1980 

Francis Sferrazza 1982 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 1981 

Harold J. Allen, Jr. 1983 

Carl A. Backman 1984 

Wilson J. Belbin 1982 

Currie N. Johnson (State Member) 1984 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence P. Flaherty 1980 

Frank H. McLean 1982 



HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Thomas W. Morris, Chairman 

James J. Durkee 

Joseph A. Paglia 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Frank D. Curley, Chairman 
Foster B. Balser 



1982 
1980 
1981 



1980 
1981 



REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 
Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 
Robert L. Cavanaugh 
Olin M. London 

Priscilla R. W. Lynch, Clerk 



1980 
1982 
1981 



7 




TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
Paul Duggan 
Robert P. Palmer 
Frank H. Tuttle 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Arnold C. Blake, Chairman 
Rachel M. Burns 
Elizabeth R. Fosgate 



1980 
1982 
1981 



1980 
1981 
1982 



Precinct 4 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Dep. Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Edith Cuoco, Dep. Inspector 



Annually 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
George R. Allan, Chairman 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 



WILMINGTON ELECTIONS OFFICERS 

Precinct 1 
Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sencabaugh, Dep. Warden 
Joan M. Lanzillo, Clerk 
Sandra S. Volpe, Dep. Clerk 
Clarice J.Ross, Inspector 
Alta Lyons, Dep. Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Jane A. Hill, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Dep. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Marjorie MacDonald, Dep. Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Dep. Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Dep. Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Alice G. Marcy, Dep. Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Dep. Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Barbara J. Buck, Dep. Inspector 



1981 
1982 



Annually 



Precinct 5 
Jean LaFavour, Warden 
Dora Ardolino, Dep. Warden 
Margaret Blonigan, Clerk 
Janice L. Rudnicki, Dep. Clerk 
Elizabeth Blaisdell, Inspector 
Mary T. Ward, Dep. Inspector 
Ruth S. Coursey, Inspector 
Annabel Antinarelli, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret L. Perry, Warden 
Nancy J. Tarricone, Dep. Warden 
Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 
Nancy C. DeWilde, Dep. Clerk 
Diane J. Ryan, Inspector 
Patricia D. McNaughton, Dep. Inspector 
Evelyn W. Conlin, Dep. Inspector 
Elizabeth Andrews, Inspector 

250 ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 

Joan Maga, Chairman 

Harriet J. Cain 

Robert J. Cain 

John C. Clark 

Paula O'Brien 

Charles P. Kelley 

David B. Hill 

Fructuoso T. Carrasco 

Robert Z. Brown 

Robert S. Boyce 

Adele C. Passmore 

George W. Hooper 

Joan D. Searfoss 




Police Chief Paul Lynch Feted on Retirement 

8 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1, 1979 - 1980 



Accountant 

Animal Inspector 

Assistant Town Manager 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Civil Defense Director 

Constable 

Constable 

Dog Officer 

Engineer 

Fire Chief 

Gas Inspector 

Highway Superintendent 

Inspector of Buildings 

Ipswich River Watershed Commission 

Librarian 

Medical Agent (Board of Health) 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Middlesex Canal Commission 

Middlesex County Advisory Board 

Milk Inspector 

Nurse, Public Health 

Plumbing Inspector 

Public Building Superintendent 

Police Chief 

Recreation Director 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk (Assistant) 

Town Collector 

Town Collector (Assistant) 

Town Counsel 

Town Sanitarian 

Town Treasurer 

Town Treasurer (Assistant) 

Tree and Moth Superintendent 

Veterans' Agent 

Veterans' Grave Officer 

Water Superintendent 

Wire Inspector 




Robert H. Peters 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Reginald Stapczynski 
Francis E. Downs 
Silverius J. Blonigen 
James Edward Burke 
Arthur V. Lynch 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Robert L. Higgins 
Arthur J. Boudreau 
William R. Harrison 
Robert P. Palmer 
Charles P. Lawrenson 
Herbert D. Nickerson 
Philip W. Meriam 

Stella Courtney 
Stanley Webber 
Michael A. Caira 
Ernest F. Romano 
Anne E. Butters, R.N. 
William R. Harrison 
Roy P. McClanahan 
Bobby N. Stewart 
Ronald Swasey 
Martin P. Farrell 
Priscilla R. W. Lynch 
Kathleen M. Scanlon 
Marion C. Murphy 
Catherine P. Lindmark 
Alan Altman 
Ernest F. Romano 
Rachel M. Burns 
Elizabeth R. Fosgate 
Thomas 0. Sullivan 
Paul A. Farrell 
Paul A. Farrell 
Paul C. Duggan 
James J. Russo 



Retiring Water Superintendent, Ken Motschman and Predecessor, Ed Sargent 



9 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1980 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Total Deficits 

School Lunch Program 

Elderly Lunch Program 

Free Public Libraries 

Special Education Grant Chapter 766 

Underestimate 
Amount Necessary to Satisfy Court Judgment 
County Retirement Assessment 
County Tax 

Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Air Pollution Control Districts 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Ipswich River Water Shed 

Underestimate 
State Recreation Areas 
Audit of Municipal Accounts 
Overlay of Current Year 



$ 14,574,223.00 
1,233,290.00 
387,367.00 
36,583.00 
11, 356.00 
6,621.00 
21,167.00 
3,583.00 
15,250.00 
328,443.00 
306,412.46 
104,244.27 
199,538.84 
2,418.75 
2,426.97 
2,648.40 
43.71 
1,109.12 
79,290.93 
4,211.28 
416,201.53 



$15,807,513.00 



1,928,916.26 
$17,736,429.26 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 



1980 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 

Agency Funds 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Licenses 
Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Libraries 

Cemeteries 

Farm Animal and Machinery 
Interest 

Ambulance Services 
Sewer Revenue 

Workmen's Comp. and Ins. Reimb. 
Dog License Reimb. 
Miscellaneous Receipts 
Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 



$ 3,069,941.00 
1,149,847.47 
7,200.00 
14,446.75 
40,388.52 
15,097.00 
18,665.55 
4,660.56 
1,185.59 
9,475.00 
315. 35 
198,599.46 
4,771.08 
77,842.03 
5,510.12 
2,608.00 
1,513.93 
51,997.29 
1,233,290.00 



5,907,354.70 
$11,829,074.56 



Personal Property 
Real Estate 



$ 5,171,590.00 @ 77.00 per M 
148,452,755.00 @ 77.00 per M 



398,212.43 
11,430,862.13 
$11,829,074.56 



10 



Recapitulation - 1980 Fiscal Year (continued) 

Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate: 



Betterments and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest $ 9,889.08 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 12,699.15 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 10,886.71 

Liens added to taxes: 

a. Water Liens 35,593.86 

b. Sewer Liens 1,533.08 

70,601.88 

Total of all other commitments $ 11,899,676.44 



Veterans 7 Agent 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115, as amended, with strict com- 
pliance to this Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are for the 
needy Veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforeseen needs. Final approval of benefits 
comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The balance for the first six months of 1979 from previous appropriation was $23,417.95. A balance of 
$15,932.33 remaining June 30, 1979. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1979 was $20,000.00. Total ex- 
pended for aid to Veterans and their families for the entire year 1979 was $15,983.58. 

Total reimbursement for 1979 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's 
Office was $1,589.00. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioner's Office is shared by the 
Town, the Town's share on assignment cases was $794.50. The total amount of $1,589.00 has been turned over to 
the Town Treasurer, and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustments of any monies can be made before 
State reimbursement to the Town. 

This department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social Security, 
V.A. Disabilities, Pension, Compensations, and G.I. Education or on the job training; plus aiding applicants 
for S.S.I. Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns and lack of work, always has an impact on expenditures. 
Case load varies from time to time. 

The appropriation for 1979 and six months of 1980 was $20,000.00, as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a 
balance of $11,502.04 forwarded for the first six months of 1980. 



11 



Town Collector 



COMMITTMENTS 



1979 



1981 Real Estate 

1980 Real Estate 

1980 App. Water Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1980 Street Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1980 Water Lien 

1980 App. Sewer Betterments 

Committed Interest 

1980 Sewer Liens 

1980 Personal Property 

1980 Farm 

1979 Motor Vehicle Excise 

1978 Motor Vehicle Excise 

1977 Motor Vehicle Excise 

App. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 

App. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
Unapp. Water Betterment 

1979 Deferred Real Estate 
Interest and Fees 

1978 Deferred Real Estate 
Interest and Fees 
Deferred Water Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Ambulance 

TOTAL COMMITTMENTS 



COLLECTIONS 



1979 



Real Estate 

App. Water Betterments 
Committed Interest 
App. Street Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 

App. Sewer Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Sewer Liens 
Personal Property 
Farm 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

App. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 

Committed Interest 

App. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 

Committed Interest 

Estimated Sewer - Paid in Advance 

Deferred Real Estate 

Deferred Water Betterment 

Committed Interest 

Interest and Costs 

Ambulance 

Municipal Lien Cert, and Better. Cert, 
Advertising Charges 
Registry Fees 

Water Department Collections 
TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



1980 
$5,403,834. 19 
5,873.30 
3,084.91 
5,554.23 
2,772.28 
32,178.76 
1,354.09 
812.44 
4,228.97 
198,181.82 
88.35 



12 



1979 
$5,556,152.31 

1,350.80 
921.82 
468.12 
273. 79 

2,276.28 



191,812.60 

785,643.74 
231.28 
2.49 
1,164.64 
15.24 
352. 50 
1,607.65 
809.84 
58.37 
48,372.99 
4,427.25 
6,089.00 
323. 50 
10.30 
927,621.45 



$ 1.078.0C 
11,432,299.47' 
8,051.55 
4,647.60 
6,500.39) 
3,388.69 
35,593.86 
6,725.47'. 
4,161.24 
1,533.08' 
400,108.591 
144.60 
1,005,691.38' 
38,535.391 
1, 393.11! 
231.281 
2.49) 
1,248.31 
82. fl 
11,390.01 
1,607.65: 
70.17 
1,630.0(1 
201.23 
809 . 84- 
58.371 
9,540.001 



1978 
$ 100,446.18 
278.81 
104.25 



302.74 

458.06 
179,303.15 



12,976,723.981 

OTHER YEARS 
$ 23,529.35] 
149. ■ 
71. m 

280.68 
186.711 
466.181 



198.601 
41,366.25| 



1,630.00 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held on 
the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 626 of 
the Acts of 1958, these meetings are open to the public and press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration periods as are required by the law for the Annual Town Meeting and Election and 
for the Special Town Meeting held in September. 

The Town Clerk attended Massachusetts Town Clerks Conferences in order to keep up with the constantly changing 
election laws. 

Last year I reported that the County was implementing a new Jury procedure. I would like to report that it 
has been most successful, the county reports that it is saving us approximately $50,000.00 a month and they 
anticipate that other counties will soon follow. 

The number of registered voters dropped considerably from 1978 due to the fact that people neglected to return 
their census forms and were dropped from the voter list, or new residents in town neglected to notify the Town 
Clerk of their presence in town. In order to keep a true census of the town we need the cooperation of all 
the townspeople. Please, in the future, try to return any correspondence concerning the census as soon as 
possible and pass the word on to friends and neighbors to do the same. 

1975 State Census (considered "OFFICIAL") 17,656 
1979 Town Census Estimated 17,800 



Registered Voters as of September, 1979 

Democrats 3,859 

Republicans 860 

Independents 3,847 




Sewer Construction Continues 

13 





Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended : 



Births - final figure for 1978 
Births - actually recorded for 1979 



194 
190 



Marriage Intentions recorded for 1979 
Marriages recorded for 1979 



171 

215 



Deaths recorded for 1979 



110 



Chapter 46, Section 15 : 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 207, Sections 19, 20, and 40 : 

The laws pertaining to filing Marriage Intentions has been changed by Chapter 718, Acts of 1979. May I 
suggest that anyone intending to file call the Town Clerk's office for particulars. 

Chapter 114, Section 45 : 

Forty-six (46) burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 
1979. Fourteen out-of-state deaths were reported and filed in this office. Twenty-seven (27) Wilmington 
Veterans were buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 



Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables : 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in the 
Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about the 15th of 
March. If not registered, by law the license may be revolked by the licensing authority after a public hearin 



Other Services : 

Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request) . 
Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 
Send State elections to State Secretary forthwith. 

Provide the County of Middlesex with up-to-date list of all persons over the age of 17 years for Jury Pool. 
Certify an undetermined number of births, marriages, and deaths. 



TOWN RECORDS 



Inflammables 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 

Uniform Commercial Code terminations 

Federal Tax Lein recordings 

Dog Licenses issued 

Duplicate Dog Tags issued 

Bazaars & Raffles 

Fish & Game licenses 

Pole locations 

Medical registrations 

Business Certificates recorded 

Business withdrawal 



1502 



15 

5 

854 
8 

41 
1 



78 
228 
30 
11 



14 



Other Services (continued) 

Certify an undetermined number of births (abstract form) used for school entrance, driver's licenses, out-of- 
state travel and job applications. 

Supply proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance. 
Provide for sale miscellaneous books and maps. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the Town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 
Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Board of Selectmen. 
Certify same. 

Record Board of Appeals applications and Decisions and certify same as provided in Chapter 41A, section 11 and 

15 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 

Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 

Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town Ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 
Supervise payrolls for the Town Meeting and Election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination papers and the report of campaign and political finance 
expenditures . 

The Town Clerks of Middlesex County were notified and thanked by Joseph Romanow, Jury Commissioner, for the 
Middlesex County Court system that the transition from the old way to One Day or One Trial has worked out most 
successfully and that the remainder of the State is planning on following suit. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, she has met 
with the Board of Registrars on regular meeting nights as well as special meetings, kept the minutes of the 
meetings up to date, supervised the annual census by mail, kept the voting list up-to-date and registered 
voters during the regular office hours of the Town Clerk. Also met with the Board for special evening 
sessions to register voters and to certify nomination papers. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 



1,502 



Dogs Confined 



428 



Complaints Covered 



3,260 



Court Complaints 



346 



Court Fines 



$3,460 



Dogs Disposed of 



487 



Dogs Killed by Cars 



7 4 



Residents Notified for Licenses 



1,070 



1 5 



Town Treasurer 



GENERAL FUND 



Cash on Hand 7/1/78 $ 2,322,919.72 

Receipts Fiscal 1979 35,347,325.44 

Disbursements Fiscal 1979 36,066,133.67 

Cash on Hand 6/30/79 $ 1,604,111.49 

REVENUE SHARING (Federal) 

Cash on Hand 7/1/78 $ 57,476.58 

Receipts Fiscal 1979 (including earnings) 549,798.15 

Disbursements Fiscal 1979 580,776.00 

Cash on Hand 6/30/79 $ 26,498.73 

SPECIAL PROJECT - WATER MAINS FUNDED BY ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION (Federal) 

Cash on Hand 7/1/78 $ 0.00 

Receipts Fiscal 1979 478,190.35 

Disbursements Fiscal 1979 478,190.35 

Cash on Hand 6/30/79 0.00 

During Calendar 1979, it was necessary to borrow in anticipation of tax revenue. While we have tax anticipa- 
tion notes outstanding, it is illegal to invest general fund monies. 

INVESTMENTS 



During calendar 1979, the program of investing idle funds in Certificates of Deposit, U.S. Treasury Note 

repurchase agreements, and daily interest accounts was continued with the following results: 

Designation of Funds 1979 Earnings 

Revenue Sharing $ 11,965.34 

AntiRecession 2,400.81 
General Funds 

Investments 179,098.93 

Daily Interest Accounts 76,455.33 

$ 269,920.41 



16 



Town Engineer 



Evaluation of Work Load 

An examination of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent our time this year as 
follows: 20% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 25% Water and Sewer Board, Construction Projects; 
15% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 20% Town-Wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 10% all 
others . 

In-House Procedures 

The updating of Assessors' maps continues to be a problem which requires a large part of our time. Current 
updated Assessors' maps are a valuable tool for the town's citizens and other town departments, boards and 
commissions . 

Cataloguing of the department's material, which was started some time ago, was continued with summer help 
personnel . 

Projects for the Year 

Streets prepared for acceptance which were later favorably acted upon by the Town Meeting were Dexter Street, 
King Street Extension and Reading Avenue to be constructed under the betterment act and Freeport Drive, 
Heather Drive, Lucaya Circle, Sparhawk Drive, Gandalf Way, Agostino Drive, Clorinda Road, North Washington 
Avenue and Everett Avenue. 

This year's most significant improvement has been the physical transfer of the entire department from its 
former location in the Highway Building on Andover Street to the new Town Hall Annex on Middlesex Avenue, the 
first half of the move being accomplished in the latter three months of the year. When the move is complete, 
the new quarters will provide workable space and better conditions for the department personnel as well as 
consolidating service oriented departments. 

Conclusion 

The department continues to adjust time and resource priorities to better serve Town-wide interests. 



Improving Dangerous Curve on Middlesex Avenue 




17 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as cleaning catch basins, 
sweeping streets, patching streets, replacing and painting guardrails, making and installing street signs, 
scraping back roads with the grader, replacing broken curbing, etc. 

Drainage : 

Drainage systems were installed, repaired or extended on the following streets: Salem Street, Chestnut Street, 
Marjorie Road, Westdale Avenue, Crescent Street, Shawsheen Avenue, Woburn Street near West Street, Lowell 
Street, Grove Avenue, Bancroft Street, Cottage Street, Burnap Street, Marie Drive, Veranda Avenue, McDonald 
Road, North Street, Lawrence Street, Lawrence Court, Andover Street and Woburn Street near High Street. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance & Hot Top Program : 

Sections of the following streets were upgraded with 1 1/2 inch of bituminous concrete finish: Ballardvale 
Street, West Street, Industrial Way, Woburn - Eames Street. 

Chapter 90 Construction : 

West Street at Lowell Street - constructed a "right turn only" lane. 
Sidewalk Construction: 



Forest Street sidewalk was completed. 
Snow and Ice Removal : 

During the winter of 1979, the Highway Department recorded 36.1 inches of snow. The cost of snow removal 
this year was $168,441.70. 

Roadside Pickup : 

With the use of C.E.T.A. personnel (federally funded), our roadsides were cleaned of rubbish on a continuous 
basis from May through August. 

Brooks and Streams : 

As in past years, we used C.E.T.A. personnel for our streams and brooks maintenance. 
Equipment : 

The mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude that we must replace 
2 dump trucks, 2 pickup trucks, a sweeper, sander body and front end loader. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department for keeping us 
informed during the winter months of the road conditions between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 a.m., week- 
days, and Saturday, Sunday and holidays; the Water, Tree and Cemetery Departments for their cooperation 
during snow storms and various other departments for the help extended this department during 1979. To the 
Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last, 
but not least, to the men of the Highway Department who made 1979 a very productive year, my sincere thanks 
and appreciation. 



18 



Tree Department 



Trimming, cutting and removing trees, being routine work, was done by the Tree Department. By request of 
Town residents, 70 hornets nests were destroyed. Assistance was given to the School Maintenance & Public 
Buildings Department in replacing lights and flag pole ropes. Decorating was done throughout the Town at 
Christmas upon request of the Beautif ication Committee. The equipment of the Tree Department was used to 
plow snow for the Highway Department. Roadside stumps were removed with the stump cutter. There will be 
no tree planting program for 1980. 

Dutch Elm Disease : 

Elm tree samples were taken and sent to the University of Massachusetts for testing. Seventy-nine (79) 
dutch elm trees were taken down. 

Insect Pest Control : 

Gypsy moth, elm leaf beetles, clinch bugs, Eastern tent caterpillars, ticks, fall web worms, pine saw flies 
and Japanese beetles were kept under control by spraying. We had a great deal of gypsy moth in 1979 and 
expect more in 1980. If you think you have a problem with gypsy moth, please contact the Tree Department. 
Now is the time to destroy the gypsy moth egg masses. 

Mosquito Control Program : 

The spraying for the control of mosquitoes is done in the evening between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and midnight. 
All trapped water holes and some catch basins were treated with larvaecide. We are expanding this program 
in 1980. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the town departments for 
their cooperation, and the men of the Tree Department for their efforts during the year 1979. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



The following is a list of all measuring and weighing devices, scales, meters, pumps, and weights that were 
tested, sealed, not sealed, and condemmed during the year 1979. 





Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Ad j us ted 


Condemmed 


Balances, Scales, Weights 


196 


23 


86 


21 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


184 


10 


56 


26 


Capacity Measures 


36 


14 


20 


28 


Other Measuring Devices 


52 


19 


36 


20 


Prepackaged Foods Reweighed 


5,700 









19 



Inspector of Buildings 







1977 






1978 






1979 




No. 


Valuation 


No. 




Valuation 


No. 




Valuation 


Dwelling (single family) 


51 


$ 1,435,000 


28 


$ 


914,000 


42 


$ 


1,608,000 


Residential Garages 


10 


36,600 


9 




64,000 


11 




74,000 


Additions & Alterations 


1 1 A 

11U 


/,! Q 7 ;n 
<4 lO , / Jl) 


in; 




jol , 4UU 


ljj 




600,454 






$ 1,890,350 




$ 


1,359,400 




$ 


2,282,454 


Industrial Buildings 


6 


$ 5,528,000 


5 


$ 


625,000 


6 


$ 


9,847,000 


Commercial Buildings 


4 


219,000 


1 




65,000 









Additions & Alterations (non-res) 


17 


549,000 


16 




927,600 


19 




402,000 


Swimming Pools 


43 


158,050 


42 




115,100 


34 




122,450 


Signs 


11 


11,485 


16 




17,000 


10 




3,550 


Utility Buildings 







2 




88,000 


1 




18,000 


Office Buildings 





















Recreational Buildings 


1 


1,700 
















Sheds & Barns 


9 


21,019 


8 




33,500 


5 




6,300 


Medical Building 


1 


2,009,000 
















Temporary Buildings 


1 


1,200 


1 




3,000 









Woodburning Stoves 







2 




500 


163 




84,175 






$ 8,498,454 




$ 


1,874,700 




$10,483,475 






$10,388,804 




$ 


3,234,100 




$12,765,929 


Renewals 


5 




6 






6 






Demolitions 


7 


$ 36,400 


14 


$ 


90,900 


7 


$ 


26,150 


Fire Damage & Repair 


1 


14,000 









4 




35,500 


Foundations 


9 


19,500 


5 




18,500 


10 




27,500 




286 


$ 69,900 


260 


$ 


109,400 


451 


$ 


89,150 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED 


OVER TO 


TREASURER: 














Building Permits 


286 


$ 29,036.50 


261 


$ 


7,596.80 


445 


$ 


37,790.00 


Wiring Permits 


343 


4,131.75 


299 




4,009.75 


328 




4,210.75 


Gas Permits 


125 


1,137.50 


90 




822.00 


118 




1,026.00 


Plumbing Permits 


85 


894.00 


80 




755.50 


109 




1,060.00 




839 


$ 35,199.75 


730 


$ 


13,184.05 


1000 


$ 


44,086.75 




Old Whitefield School Converted to Town Hall Annex 



20 



Board of Appeals 



Applicant 

Case #1-79 
Robert F. Brown 

Case #2-79 

John A. Lovetiere 

Case #3-79 
Hyman Jacobs 

Case #4-79 

John & Elvira DeRoy 

Case #5-79 
Paul St.Hilaire 



Case #6-79 

Michael & Janet Sullivan 
Case #7-79 



Stephen Olson 



Case #8-79 
David Doucette 

Case #9-79 
Arthur Smith 



Case #10-79 
James Tighe 



Reason for Appeal 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, (Schedule 
of Requirements) to allow an existing dwelling to 
remain in required reserve rear yard. 

To acquire a special permit from Section III-B-5 
to allow for additional sign area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling on lot having insufficient 
front & depth. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
existing garage to remain within side & rear yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling on lot having insufficient 
front & depth. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a lot into two lots, with insufficient front & depth, 
for property located at 55 Chestnut Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a lot into two lots with insufficient depth & front. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling on lot having insufficient 
depth & area. 

To acquire permission from Section III-6-A.1, to 
erect single family dwelling in flood plan district 
and Section III-6-B.2, for the construction of 
driveways as a means of access to property located 
on Federal Street. 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Withdrawn 



Case #11-79 
Charles Mulik 



To acquire a special permit with Section III-B.5, to 
increase sign area for property located on 316 Main 
Street . 



Granted 



Case #12-79 
Richard Stuart 



Case #13-79 
Margaret Norton 
Niantic CN 



To acquire a special permit from Section V-I,D, to 
alter existing dwelling in manner less detrimental 
for property located at 111R Grove Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
exist dwelling to remain within a required reserve 
front & side yard, for property located at 294 
Shawsheen Avenue. 



Den i ed 



Granted 



21 



Applicant Reason for Appeal Decision 



Case #14-79 

Sadowski Realty Trust 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
two existing structures to remain within required 
reserve yard areas, for property located at 13 
Cochrane Road. 


Granted 


Case #15-79 

Alfred Fraumeni, Jr. 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to obtain 
4 building permits for lots with insufficient front- 
age and depth, for property located at 157 Lake Street. 


Denied 


Case #16-79 
Isabelle Cowens 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling on lot having insufficient 
front & depth & area, for property located on First 
Avenue and Dorchester Street. 


Denied 


Case #17-79 
Arthur Durante 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 


Granted 


Case #18-79 

Douglas & Brenda Andersen 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a swimming pool within a required reserve side yard. 


Granted 


Case #19-79 
Antonetta Micalizzi 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow a 
lot to be subdivided into two non-conforming lots 
with insufficient area, to further allow the con- 
version of two-car garage into a dwelling unit. 


Denied 


Case #20-79 

Francis & Maureen Hughes 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow a lot 
to be subdivided into" three non-conforming lots for 
the purpose of obtaining two building permits. 


Granted 


Case #21-79 
John Cutter 


To obtain a variance to erect a sign (enlarge) (6'x8') 
within a required reserve front yard for property 
located at 611 Main Street. 


Granted 


Case #22-79 
Albert D'Ovidio 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling within a required front 
yard property located on Safford Road. 


Denied 


Case #23-79 

John C. Boudreau, Jr. 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect a 
garage within a required reserve side yard. 


Granted 


Case #24-79 
James Frost 


To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a lot into two non-conforming lots having insufficient 
area. 


Denied 


Case #25-79 to #29-79 
Compugraphic Corporation 


To obtain a variance from Section V, height, area, and 
yard regulations, Table V-l. Schedule of Requirements, 
wherein the maximum building height in an Industrial 
District is three stories or forty feet for property 
located on Ballardvale Street Connection. 


Granted 


Case #26-79 

Compugraphic Corporation 


To obtain a variance from Section II, Paragraph 10, 
wherein an area of two hundred square feet and a 
width of ten feet are required for parking of one 
motor vehicle, for property located on Ballardvale 
Street Connection. 


Granted 


Case #27-79 

Compugraphic Corporation 


To obtain a variance from Section IV, Special Regula- 
tions Governing Use Districts, Para. IV-3. Off-Street 
Parking, Subpara. A, wherein a parking area must be 
within 300 feet of the principal building, located on 
Ballardvale Street Connection. 


Granted 



22 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #28-79 
Compugraphic Corp. 



To obtain a variance from Section IV, Special 
Regulations Governing Use Districts, Para. IV- 3, 
Off-Street Parking, Subpara. 7, wherein one parking 
space is required for each 100 square feet of floor 
area or fraction thereof for office occupancy, 
located on Ballardvale Street Connection. 



Granted 



Case #29-79 
Compugraphic Corp. 



To obtain a variance from Section IV, Special 
Regulations Governing Use Districts, Para. IV-3, 
Off-Street Parking, Subpara. A and Subpara, 8, 
wherein one parking space is required for each 
two hundred square feet of floor space or a fraction 
thereof for storage and manufacturing occupancy, 
located on Ballardvale Street Connection. 



Granted 



Case #30-79 

John & Elvira DeRoy 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
an existing dwelling to remain within required 
reserve side yard. 



Granted 



Case #31-79 
Gerard Otis 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
the construction of a single family dwelling on a 
lot having insufficient depth, for property located 
on Birch Street. 



Granted 



Case #32-79 
Dennis Rooney 



To acquire a special permit to allow the temporary 
use of two trailers for not longer than one year 
for property located on 904 Main Street. 



Granted 



Case #33-79 
John J. McCarthy 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 



Granted 



Case #34-79 
Arnold Schultz 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with 
Section VI-1D, (non-conforming use) to allow 
alteration and enlargement of structure located at 
409 Main Street. 



Granted 



Case #35-79 
Edmund Corcoran 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with 
Section VI-ID, (non-conforming use) to allow 
alteration and enlargement of structure located 
at 334 Main Street. 



Granted 



Case #36-79 

Dennis & Sandra Volpe 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect 
an addition within a required reserve side yard. 



Granted 



Case #37-79 
Robert Annaian 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
an existing dwelling to remain within a required 
reserve side yard. 



Granted 



Case #38-79 
James G. Keramas 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to sub- 
divide a parcel of land into two parcels, one 
having insufficient depth and frontage, the other 
having insufficient depth for property located on 
Woodside Avenue. 



Denied 



Case #39-79 

John and Mary Heine 



Case #40-79 

Bioassay Systems Corp. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
lot into two lots, one having all minimum require- 
ments, the other having insufficient depth, for the 
purpose of obtaining a building permit. 

To obtain a special permit authorizing biological & 
environmental research & development laboratory for 
property on Ballardvale Street. 

23 



Withdrawn 



Wi thdrawn 




Applicant 
Case #41-79 

Manzo Truck Serv. & Ref., Inc. 



Case #42-79 
John A. Hurst 



Case #43-79 
Charles Ballou 



Case #44-79 
Arthur Smith 



Case #45-79 
Richard Stuart 



Case #46-79 
B. Tracy Nixon 



Case #47-79 

Joseph DeGiacomo, Agent 
Case #48-79 

Dante J. & Judith Gandolfo 



Case #49-79 
Peter DeGennaro 



Case #50-79 

Harold Parker, Agent 

Bay Bank Middlesex 

Case #51-79 
Samuel E. Freeman 



Case #52-79 
Vincent Puleo 



Case #53-79 
Nlckolas Carrozza 

Case #54-79 
William C. Husen 



Case #55-79 

Arthur W. Worringham 



Case #56-79 
Joseph P. Casey 



Reason for Appeal 

To acquire a special permit from Section III-4-B,5 
authorizing the storage repair and cleaning of 
trucks and trailers. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a swimming pool within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a special permit from Section 111,1-B,1, 
the conversion of a single family dwelling plus the 
use as an In-Law apartment. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
depth and area, property located on Wild Avenue. 

To obtain a special permit from Section VI-l.D, to 
alter existing dwelling in a manner less detrimental 
or injurious to persons/or to adjacent property. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to authorize 
building permit for the construction of additional 
room on an existing concrete foundation. 

To obtain a special permit from Section V-l-2, for 
the temporary use of a trailer as an office. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow the 
installation of a swimming pool within a required 
reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow the 
erection of a sign within a required reserve front 
yard for property located on 312 Main Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section III-3-B-5, to 
erect additional signs on property located at 390 
Main Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section IV-3A-7 (off- 
street parking) to allow for the construction of 
an addition for fewer parking spaces for property 
located at 160 Lowell Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a dwelling on a lot having insufficient depth, front- 
age and area, for property located on Wabash Road. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
an addition within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
construction of an addition within a required re- 
serve front yard. 

To obtain a special permit from Section II-l, Bl, to 
alter a single family dwelling for use also as two 
family dwelling (mother-in-law) apartment. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-5, lot depth, 
measured at right angles. . 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



24 



Hi 



Applicant 

Case #57-79 
Michael J. Simmons 

Case #58-79 

Stephen J. Malfa and 

Ann C. Malfa 

Case #59-79 
Anthony Tomasi 



Case #60-79 

John L. R. Dionne 

Case #61-79 
John Warford 

Case #62-79 
Dominic Corella 



Case #63-79 
David P. Galante 

Case #64-79 
Morris R. Anderson 



Case #65-79 

Joseph DeGiacomo, Agent 
Case #66-79 

Compugraphic Corporation 



Case #67-79 
Rubin Frankel 



Case #68-79 

Warren K. MacDonald 



Case #69-79 
Ralph Newhouse 



Case #70-79 

William & Barbara Godfrey 



Case #71-79 
Charles W. Doucette 



Case #72-79 

John L. R. Dionne 



Reason for Appeal 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a swimming pool within a required reserve side yard. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow for 
the construction of a carport within a required re- 
serve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a porch within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a lot into two non-conforming lots each having in- 
sufficient frontage and depth. 

To appeal the determination of Inspector of Buildings 
denying right to perform auto body repair. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a lot into two lots of sufficient area, with a 30 ft. 
right of way to rear lot. 

To obtain a special permit in compliance with Section 
V-l-2, for the temporary use of a trailer as an office. 

To acquire a variance pursuant to Sections VIII-4B.3 
and Section IV-3, (off-street parking) subpara. A, and 
Section V-4.C, to allow a parking area beyond 300 ft. 
of principal building and to park cars within a set- 
back area for property located at 5 Cornell Place. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain within a required reserve 
side yard. 

To obtain a special permit from Section III-1.B1, to 
allow the alteration of a single family dwelling into 
a two family dwelling. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a lot into two non-conforming lots of insufficient 
frontage and depth, both having more than the re- 
quired area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain on a lot having insuffi- 
cient area. 

To obtain a special permit from Section III-5.B.la, 
to allow open lot for parking or sale of used autos 
not operated in connection with a salesroom for new 
autos . 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect a 
garage within a required reserve yard area. 

25 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #73-79 

Fred & Maryann Cain 



Case #74-79 
David D. Romanski 



Case #75-79 
Charles Mulik 



Case #76-79 
Richard Medeiros 



Case #77-79 
Gerda Kintigos 



Case #78-79 
Chester A. Bruce 



Case #79-79 
Richard D. Poloian 



Case #80-79 
Adam Kozlowski 

Case #81-79 

Ralph & Lorraine Allen 



Case #82-79 

Edmund & Debra Gennetti 



Case #83-79 
James V. Campbell 

Case #84-79 

Michael & Patricia McGonagle 

Case #85-79 

Richard and Diana Fay 



Case #86-79 

Douglas & Eileen Chisholm 



To acquire a variance from Section IV-1, and Section 
V-l, to allow a subdivision of a parcel of land into 
two non-conforming lots, both having insufficient 
frontage and depth. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect an 
addition to an existing dwelling within a reserve 
rear yard. 

To obtain a special permit from Section III-1.B1, 
to alter a single family dwelling into a two family 
dwelling (mother-in-law apartment) . 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
frontage, depth and area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to obtain a 
building permit to build on a lot having insufficient 
frontage, depth and area, for property located on 
Dunton Road. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow the 
subdivision of lot into one non-conforming and one 
conforming lot, the non-conforming lot having insuf- 
ficient frontage and depth. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
land into two lots, one non-conforming having insuffi- 
cient depth, for property located at 59 Washington Ave. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a dwelling on a lot having insufficient depth and area 
for property located on Onley Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain within a required reserve 
yard . 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a parcel of land into one non-conforming lot having 
insufficient frontage and depth. 

To acquire a special permit from Section V-l.d, to 
enlarge a non-conforming use by extending building 
approximately 65 square feet, located at 139 Main St. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain on a lot having insuffi- 
cient side and front yard area. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow the 
continued use of two existing auxiliary buildings 
within a reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to permit the 
erection of a radio antenna in excess of 38 feet in 
height. 



26 




Applicant 

Case #87-79 

I. Fred Dicenso 



Case #88-79 
Clara V. Eichel 



Case #89-79 

Prudential Insurance Co. 



Case #90-79 

N. American Accept. Corp. 
c/o F.F. Cain 

Case #91-79 
Marjorie E. Wilson 



Case #92-79 
Frank L. Stevens 



Case #93-79 
Joseph Oliver 

Case #94-79 
Herbert W. Cutter 



Case #95-79 

Samuel & Esther Freeman 



Reason for Appeal 

To acquire a variance from Section IV-3.A.8, (off- 
street parking) to allow the erection of an addition 
having insufficient parking requirements for property 
at Industrial Way. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow a 
parcel of land be subdivided into three lots, two 
lots having insufficient frontage. 

To acquire a variance from Section VIII-4B.2 & 3, to 
allow for less than the required parking spaces for 
property at 100 Fordham Road, and for a permit to 
allow for a portion of parking within the set-back 
area required by Section V-l, and Section V-4.C & d. 

To acquire a special permit from Section VI-2 
(temporary uses) authorizing the use of a trailer 
as an office. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l to subdivide 
a parcel of land into two lots, one fully complying, 
the other lot having insufficient frontage. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect an 
addition within a required reserve front yard for 
property located at 841 Woburn Street. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect a 
garage within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to subdivide 
a parcel of land into two lots, one lot fully com- 
plying, and the other lot having insufficient frontage. 

To acquire a variance from Section IV-3A-7, (off- 
street parking) to construct an addition with fewer 
than the required parking spaces for property located 
at 160 Lowell Street. 



Decision 



Denied 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



Denied 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #96-79 
Martin Kuchler 

Case #97-79 

Roger M. Ulrickson 



Case #98-79 
Charlotte Guthrie 



Case #99-79 

M. Howland, Trustee 



Case #100-79 
Joseph Parrella 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to erect an 
addition within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l and Section 
V-3, to allow an existing dwelling to remain within 
a required reserve side yard and with insufficient 
frontage for property located at 100 Morse Avenue. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain within a required side 
yard . 

To acquire a variance from Section IV-3, (off-street 
parking) to allow for fewer than the required parking 
spaces for property located on Fordham Road. 

To obtain a special permit authorizing the extension 
of a non-conforming building, (too close to the lot 
line) . 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



27 





Reason for Appeal 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to allow 
the subdivision of a parcel of land into two lots, 
one having insufficient area, the other having in- 
sufficient depth and area, located on Albany St. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, authorizing 
the temporary erection of a chimney in excess of 
permitted height limitation. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, authorizing 
erection of a two car garage within a required 
reserve side yard. 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
a garage within a required reserve side yard. 

To acquire a dimensional variance from the physical 
requirements of parking spaces and total number 
required, property located on Woburn Street. 



George & Eleanor Donovan 



To acquire a variance from Section III-1-B1, author- 
izing the conversion of a single family dwelling 
into a two-family dwelling. 

To obtain special permits as may be required, to re- 
locate and construct a building on the same lot, 
after structural damage by fire, new building not 
to exceed 50% of existing building, all in accordance 
with Sections VI-lD-a,b and Section V-l. 

To obtain a special permit authorizing the extension 
of a non-conforming building, (too close to the lot 
line) . 

To acquire a variance from Section V-l, to construct 
an addition within a required reserve front yard, for 
property located on Ballardvale Street. 

To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land 
into lots for the purpose of building single family 
dwelling. 

To obtain a special permit authorizing the erection 
of additional signs for property located at 500 Main 
Street. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 11, Lot 22, but now shown on the 
Official Map (G.L. ch. 41, S.81E) on a way known as 
Dorchester Street. 



Decision 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Case //S-2-79 
Richard C. Gray 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 40, Lot 159, but now shown on the 
Official Map (G. L. ch. 41 . S81E) on a way known as 
Commonwealth Avenue. 



Granted 



Case //S-3-79 
Albert J. D'Ovidio 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 17, Lot 5, but now shown on the 
Official Map (G.L. ch. 41. S . 81E) on a way known as 
Safford Street. 



Granted 



28 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #S-4-79 
Vincent F. D'Amato 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 33, Lot 34A, but not shown on the 
Official Map (G. L. ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Houghton Road. 



Granted 



Case //S-5-79 
David LeClair 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 7, Lot 26, but not shown on the 
Official Map (G. L. ch . 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Randolph Road. 



Granted 



Case #S-6-79 
Gerard E. Otis 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 49, Lots 21,24,25 & 26, but not 
shown on the Official Map (G. L . ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a 
way known as Birch Street. 



Granted 



Case #S-7-79 
Kevin Warford 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 32, Lot 94, but not shown on the 
Official Map (G.L. ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Auburn Avenue. 



Granted 



Case flS-8-79 
James G. Keramas 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 48, Lots 20 & 21, but not shown on 
the Official Map (G. L. ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Woodside Avenue. 



Granted 



Case //S-9-79 

William R. Harrison, Jr. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 41, Lot 14, but not shown on the 
Official Map (G. L . ch . 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Hanover Street. 



Withdrawn 



Case //S-10-79 
Vincent Puleo 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 

on Assessors' Map 8, Lot 28, but not shown on the 

Official Map (G. L. ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Wabash Road. 



Granted 



Case #S-ll-79 
Isabelle Cowens 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 11, Lots 17 & 18, but not shown on 
the Official Map (G. L. ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
First Avenue and Dorchester Street. 



Granted 



Case #S-12-79 
John T. Spencer 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 55, Lot (Laite Road) but not shown 
on the Official Map (G. L. ch . 41 . S . 81E) on a way known 
as Laite Road. 



Granted 



Case //S-13-79 
Adam Kozlowski 



To construct a single family dwelling on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 32, Lots 71, 72, & 73, but not shown 
on the Official Map (G.L . ch . 41 . S . 81E) on a way known 
as Olney Road. 



Granted 



Case //S-14-79 
Pleasant Realty Trust 



To construct two single family dwellings on land shown 
on Assessors' Map 11, Lot 38, but not shown on the 
Official Map (G. L. ch. 41 . S . 81E) on a way known as 
Albany Street. 



Denied 



29 




Police Department 



ARRESTS : 

Assault & Battery 60 

Breaking & Entering 30 

Disorderly 137 

Fraud (Larceny by Check) 41 

Forgery 4 

Larceny 57 

Larcey of Motor Vehicle 7 

Malicious Damage 30 

Narcotics 49 

Non-Support & Other Family Offenses 8 

Rape 2 

Sex Offenses 7 

Receiving Stolen Property 10 

Liquor Violations 94 

All Other Offenses 182 

718 

Juveniles Released Without Court Action: 90 
MOTOR VEHICLE COURT ACTION : 

Driver's License Violations 34 

Endangering 24 

Leaving Scene of Accident 7 

Operating Under the Influence 78 

Unregistered-Uninsured 30 

Speed 89 

Using Without Authority 2 

Other Offenses 158 

422 

MOTOR VEHICLE CITATIONS ISSUED-1979 : 

Warnings 69 

Complaints 366 

Arrests 82 

517 

PROTECTIVE CUSTODY BY AGES : 

17 and Under 96 

18 36 

19 37 

20 31 

21 23 

22 16 

23 13 

24 17 
25-29 25 
30 and Over 50 

344 

CRIMES REPORTED : 

Homicide 1 



SEX CRIMES : 

Rape 3 

Attempted Rape 1 

Indecent Exposure 13 

Indecent Assault 4 

Child Molesting 6 

Other 16 

43 

ROBBERIES : 

Firearm 3 

Knife 2 

Strong Arm 4 

Other Dangerous Weapon 2 

11 

ASSAULTS : 

Gun 2 

Knife 7 

Other Dangerous Weapon 9 

Hands, Feet, etc. 35 

Simple Assaults 44 

97 

BREAKING & ENTERING : 

Forced Entry 209 

Entry, No Force 21 

Attempted Entry 71 

301 

LARCENY : 

Pocketpicking 1 

Pursesnatching 2 

Shoplifting 3 

From Motor Vehicles 145 

M/V Parts & Accessories 96 

Bikes Stolen 94 

Larceny from Buildings 60 

From Coin Machines 1 

All Others 156 

558 

LARCENY OF MOTOR VEHICLES : 

Stolen Motor Vehicles 126 

Stolen Wilm-Recovered Wilmington 24 

Stolen Wilm-Recovered Elsewhere 61 

Stolen Elsewhere-Recovered Wilm. 66 



30 



MISCELLANEOUS COMPLAINTS : 

Arson & Bombing (Threats & Attempts) 14 

Burglar Alarms Responded to 1140 

Disturbances 1384 

Domestic Problems 210 

Emergencies 146 

Fires Responded to 170 

Juveniles 2027 

Lost and Found 21 

Malicious Damage 958 

Missing Persons 55 

Missing Persons Returned 50 

Persons Still Missing 5 

Phone Calls, Annoying, Obscene, etc. 37 

Prowlers 119 

Sudden Deaths 14 

Suicides & Attempts 8 

Suspicious Activities Reports 588 

Miscellaneous Items 4244 

Cruisers Dispatched 6925 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 961 

Fatalities 3 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

Firearm Ident. Cards Issued 112 

License to Carry Firearms Issued 289 

Firearm Permits to Sell (Dealers) 2 

Gunsmith Permits 2 

Permits to Sell Ammunition 2 

Liquor I.D.s-Now issued by RMV 9 

416 

Reports to Insurance Companies 399 

Licenses Suspended & Revoked by RMV 52 

Licenses Reinstated by RMV 35 

Empty Houses Check 169 

Summonses Delivered (From other towns 

and Wilmington Summonses) 259 



The preceding statistical report represents a total of all crimes, complaints and incidents reported; and to a 
great extent, the Law Enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police Department during the year 1979. 

Contained in these statistics are some significant changes both in enforcement efforts and in crimes committed. 
One of the most significant is a 66% increase in the number of non-Motor Vehicle Arrests, from 433 in 1978 to 
718 in 1979. Despite these efforts, the major crimes catagories have increased by .17% and the overall crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported have increased by 50% over 1978. 

The changes in crime and arrest rates in areas of major interest are as follows: Breaking and Entering: 
arrests were increased by 36% and the total incidents were reduced by 1. 

Malicious Damage (Vandalism) arrests were increased by 150% and the total incidents increased by .05%. 

Disturbance Complaints increased by .06%, despite major increases in disturbance related arrests; Disorderly 
Conduct Arrests were increased by 341%, from 31 in 1978 to 137 in 1979; Arrests for Liquor Violations were 
increased by 34%, from 21 in 1978 to 94 in 1979. 

As a bottom line to these statistics, fines returned to the Town of Wilmington as a result of court action^ 
increased by 176%, from $14,446.00 in 1978 to $39,917.00 during 1979. 

The Department makes note of some of the personnel changes during 19 79: 

The retirement of Chief Paul J. Lynch in March. 

The promotion of Sgt. Bobby N. Stewart to Chief of Police. 

The promotion of Sgt. Bernard Nally to Lieutenant. 

The promotion of Officer Robert LaRivee to Sergeant. 

The promotion of Officer James Rooney to Sergeant. 

The appointment of Chris Neville to Permanent Patrolman. 

During the past two years the department has experienced the loss of its two superior officers with Chief 
Lynch' s retirement in March and with Lt. Imbimbo's retirement in 1978. The loss of their leadership and many 
years of experience has left a void in the department which will take many years to fill. I extend my personal 
thanks to each of them for the help they have given me during this period of transition. 

Special thanks and appreciation to the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, all department 
heads and their workers for their every effort and cooperation during the year 1979, and especially to the 
members and employees of the Wilmington Police Department. 



31 



Fire Department 



The manual force consists of Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants and twenty-eight Privates. There is a call 
force of eleven members. The department responded to a total of one thousand nine hundred and seventy- two 
calls (1972). 



Residential Buildings 51 

Commercial Buildings 16 

Vehicles 100 

Brush, grass and rubbish 608 



Out of Town Assistance 
False Alarms or Needless Calls 
Rescue and Ambulance 
Service Calls 



33 
154 
722 
288 



Estimated value of property endangered was 
Estimated property loss was 
Permits issued for storage of oil 
Permits issued for blasting 

Permits issued for home fire alarms and inspections 
Permits issued for model rockets 
Permits issued for storage of black powder 
Permits issued for storage propane gas 



27,229,650 
207,417 
104 
12 
31 
5 
15 
4 



As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, and all inflammable storage were made. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief Wandell, made all necessary inspections of all 
business establishments in Town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of fire 
brigades. Fire Prevention lectures were given to the school children. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Acting Lieutenant Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the 
fire alarm system and made one hundred eighty-seven changeovers for the light and telephone companies and 
cable T.V. Checked and serviced all fire alarm boxes. Put up one mile new RC wire. New wire was strung on 
Industrial Way, Progress Way and Deming Way. Put five (5) new alarm boxes in service: 

Box 3164 J.B.F. Scientific Jewel Drive 

Box 3171 Raffi and Swanson Eames Street 

Box 6351 Charles River Breeding Lab., Inc. Ballardvale Street 

Box 3166 Altron Industrial and Progress Way 

Eighteen (18) members of the department took the required twenty-one hour Emergency Medical Technician course 
and passed the State exam. 

Twenty-five (25) members took and passed the First Responders course which is required by the State for all 
firefighters. 

This will be my "Final Report" as Chief of the Wilmington Fire Department, as I will be retiring this year 
after serving thirty-six years on the department, five years as a call firefighter and thirty years as Chief 
of the Department. 



32 



Cemetery Department 



The department has been constantly clearing brush, wood and stumps and grading for expansion. One hundred 
and fifteen loads of fill were purchased from Deloury Construction Company. One hundred and seventy-five tons 
of washings were hauled from Cronin's Pit. 

The two-grave area, Section K, was enlarged and marked, ready for use. In addition to work on the expansion 
program, routine maintenance was done throughout the year. An unused area in the old section of the cemetery 
was measured and marked out to be used for single graves. 

Throughout the year we loamed and seeded numerous graves that had settled. Areas where the grass had died 
due to the weather and other factors were refurbished upon request from the owners. A large number of markers 
were raised to ground level. 

The department was attacked a number of times this year by vandals. 

The beach areas, the Common and the Town Park were all raked and the glass and debris removed. During the 
summer this had to be done three times a week. The Little League and Veterans' Parks were fertilized and 
seeded. The diamonds were filled, graded and rolled. Bleachers were set up at each area. The dug-outs 
were repaired and painted. 

The department assisted Mr. Allgrove with the planting around the gazebo and the flag pole on the Common. Two 
loads of bark were used to mulch around the shrubs. The planting was sponsored by the Beautif ication Committee. 



The conservation sign was reinstalled at the site of conservation land on Wildwood Street, 
erected in 1978 was taken down by vandals less than an hour after being put in place. 



The original sign 



Cemetery employees and vehicles assisted the Highway Department with snow removal. 

My sincere thanks to Town Officials and all department employees for their support and assistance during the 
year 1979. 



Burials : 



Receipts : 



Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Babies 

Cremations 

Transfers 



17 
41 
56 
3 
7 
2 

126 



Interments $ 9,207.00 

Foundations for monuments 1,848.00 

Setting markers 235.00 

Affidavits 20.00 

Deeds 53.00 

Use of Tomb 10.00 

Copy of Deeds 8.00 

Payment of damages to cemetery 70 . 00 

$11,451.00 



Reserve : 

Sale of lots 



$9,902.00 



Trust Fund: 



Perpetual Care 



$10,270.00 



33 



I 

Water and Sewer Department I 



PUMPING STATISTICS 



WATER SUPPLY 






1975 


1976 


1977 


1978 


1979 


Maximum Gallons 


Per 


Day 


4,364,000 


4,922,000 


4,421,000 


4, 530,000 


4,065,001 


Maximum Gallons 


Per 


Week 


26,641,000 


31,2 32,000 


26,521,000 


29,191,000 


19,732,00! 


Maximum Gallons 


Per 


Month 


105,599,000 


116,396,000 


102,432,000 


113,113,000 


105,641,00t 


Average Gallons 


Per 


Day 


2,64 7,000 


2,762,000 


2,840,000 


2,940,000 


2 ,954,00C 


Average Gallons 


Per 


Month 


80,508,000 


84,006,000 


86,375,000 


89,4 32,000 


89,870,416 


Total Gallons Per Year 


966,090,000 


1,008,080,000 


1,036,494,000 


1,073, 187,000 


1,078, 445, 0OC 


Annual Rainfall 






50.97" 


34.67" 


46.31" 


31.33" 


45.47' 



CONSUMPTION STATISTICS-GALLONS 

Residential Use* 324,240,479 329,744,851 398,858,053 321,073,950 335,287,725 

Percent of Total 46.8% 44.6% 51.4% 41.0% 40.03 

Industrial Use 369,269,678 409,497,779 376,981,836 460,883,880 492,740,925 

Percent of Total 53.2% 55.3% 48.6% 58.9% 59.0%l 

Total Water Metered 693,510,157 739,242,630 775,839,889 781,957,830 828,028,650j 

Percent of Water Pumped** 72.0% 73.3% 74.9% 72.8% 77.0%) 

^Residential use includes small commercial users, that is, all water passing through 5/8" meters only. 

**The difference between the water pumped and the water metered, 250,416,350 gallons in 1979, represents water" 
used for flushing of water mains, for fires and other hydrant uses, and water lost due to breaks and leakage 
throughout the system. 

Our annual consumption increased this year over 1978 despite the use of a water ban during the summer. The 
ban on the use of all outside water was necessary because the Chestnut Street well was shut down in early Julyi 
due to contamination. Trichloroethylene (TCE) , a common solvent, was detected by the Massachusetts Department 
of Environmental Quality Engineering in concentrations above the recommended limit. Without the 1 million 
gallons a day provided by this well, we were not capable of meeting the maximum day demand which occurs during 
the summer months. If we did not establish the water ban, our storage tanks would have emptied, resulting in 
a serious fire and health hazard. As can be seen from the above pumping statistics, the maximum day demand 
this year was about 0.5 million gallons less than last year. This indicates that our water users adhered to 
the water ban. * 

Fortunately, the new water treatment plant was designed to remove iron and manganese from the Chestnut Street 
well, as well as Town Park and Butters Row. We were able to make modifications in the treatment plant design 
so that TCE could also be removed. 

The construction of the water treatment facility was divided into 3 construction contracts. The first two, 
consisting of a new well and water mains from the wells to the treatment plant, were completed during the year 



34 



Bids for construction of the plant were opened on August 23, 1979. Due to inflation and design modifications 
to remove TCE, the bids exceeded the available funds. It was necessary to have a special town meeting on 
September 24, 1979 to appropriate an additional $600,000. for the project. A ground-breaking ceremony was 
held on November 10, 1979. The anticipated completion date is August, 1981. 

We have been working closely with our State Representative on obtaining a State grant for 50% of the con- 
struction cost. The State has set aside 75 million dollars for the construction of water treatment plants. 
(Chapter 406) We are confident that we will receive a grant. This will lessen the financial burden of this 
important facility. 

WATER QUALITY 

Securing and maintaining an adequate supply of good quality water is becoming a problem, not only in Wilming- 
ton, but throughout the State. With the advent of more sophisticated testing equipment, tests are being per- 
formed for trace organics, such as tr ichloroethylene . This new equipment is able to measure concentrations 
in the parts-per-billion range. It is because of this testing equipment that the contamination of many wells 
throughout the State has been detected during the past year. 

The encroachment upon groundwater recharge areas will continue to endanger our drinking water. To protect our 
valuable water supplies, groundwater protection districts will have to be developed in aquifer recharge areas. 
These districts would restrict the type of development permitted near a water supply. The establishment of 
these districts could be accomplished through zoning changes. Our Board would support a well-conceived plan 
for aquifer recharge protection zones. 

In compliance with the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act we had 358 samples taken throughout the water system 
in 1979. 



WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM: 



MAINS INSTALLED IN 19 79 



STREET 
Mill Road 
Route #125 
Ballardvale Street 



Number of Feet 
1,500 
3,200 
1,500 



Main Size 
8" 
12" 
12" 



Hydrants 
3 
2 
3 



This is a total of 6,200 feet of new water main and 8 hydrants added to the system by developers. 
SEWER SYSTEM 

We continue to make progress on the Silver Lake Interceptor. The total project consists of seven construction 
projects. Contracts 1 and 2 were completed, although we have not accepted Contract 2 because of several pro- 
blems. We have hired a second engineering firm to review the work under this contract, and to advise us dur- 
ing negotiations with the contractor. We hope to be able to settle the problems without court action. 

Bids were opened on July 16, 1979 for Contract 3, which includes the residential streets around Silver Lake. 
The price tag for this contract is 1.8 million dollars. Work under Contract 7, which is a sewage pumping 
station, is nearly 100 percent complete. We expect to open bids on two more construction contracts this year, 
as we continue to increase our service area. 

As our network of sewers grows, the maintenance costs will increase. During the latter part of 1979 it was 
determined that the existing sewer near Eames Street needed to be cleaned of debris in order to maintain the 
capacity of the sewer pipe. To clean 2,600 feet of sewer it will cost $15,340. We feel that this is indica- 
tive of problems we can expect in the future and for this reason we will have to increase our sewer mainten- 
ance account. 



Passage of Article 15 of the 1979 Annual Town Meeting allows us to have unpaid sewer charges become a tax 
lien on the property. 



35 



Library Trustees 



The Board of Library Trustees, the library staff and the people of Wilmington suffered a great loss by the 
death of E. Haywood Bliss, Chairman of the Board of Library Trustees. Mr. Bliss served faithfully on the 
Board for many years, and even though in ill health for the past few years, did continue to serve. He will 
be truly missed. 

The people of Wilmington continue to use the library at an ever-increasing rate as circulation figures continu 
to grow. There has been a 36% increase in library circulation statistics over the past 5 years which indicate 
that the townspeople of Wilmington are becoming more aware of the library value, be it educational, work re- 
lated, recreational or cultural. Of particular interest is the dramatic increase over the past 5 years in 
reference services and in the children's department. This certainly reflects on the professionalism of the 
Library Director and his staff in which the townspeople of Wilmington can take great pride. 

We are happy to report that the Security System which the voters of the town approved at Town Meeting has been 
a tremendous success. The book losses which the library had experienced in past years has just about been 
eliminated. This has been accomplished with little or no inconvenience to the library patrons. 

In these times of strict fiscal austerity, the library must comply with restraints imposed by the legislature. 
However, the Trustees at this time assure the people of Wilmington that we will continue to work to provide 
the library services which you have come to expect. 




Memorial Day, 1979 

36 



Librarian 



E. Hayward Bliss 
Library Trustee & Board Chairman 
1970-1979 

"Thou was their Rock, their Fortress and 
their Might; 
Thou, Lord, Their Captain in the well- 
fought fight; 
Thou, in the darkness drear, the one 
true Light. 

Alleluia" 

From the Hymn "All Saints" by 
W. Walsham How, 1864 

In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, 
it is with pleasure, I submit my report with its accompanying statistics for the calendar year 1979. 

The Library's activity has traditionally been measured by circulation statistics. Total circulation reached 
its highest mark in 1979. The decade of the seventies closed with total circulation approaching 140,000 in 
1979. This represents a healthy increase of 6.2% over the preceeding year. In addition, reference activity 
has shown a dramatic increase of 47% in the past five years. 

The patrons of the Wilmington Memorial Library have reflected a national trend. To quote an editorial from 
the Boston Sunday Globe of December 9, 1979: "The public is using its libraries more extensively and in large 
numbers. The American Library Association says that the percentage of Americans using public libraries at 
least one a year, has risen to 51 from 42 over the past four years and a study by the University of Illinois 
found book circulation has risen 11 percent in the same period. These figures are not apt to reflect rising 
literacy. Inflation is the more obvious explanation." 

The dependence on local tax support in many communities has meant cut-backs, and increase vulnerability to the 
rising trend of cutting back municipal budgets. The Boston Globe 's editorial further states, "Even when there 
are no cut-backs, dollar ceilings that fail to keep up with inflation lead to reductions in book purchases or 
hours of operation that may really be self-defeating in saving money for local citizens. Libraries remain a 
good buy for the tax dollar." 

The Memorial Library is primarily supported by local taxation, and is currently operating with the cap imposed 
by the Governor and Massachusetts General Court. The economics and concerns of the seventies are being carried 
into the eighties. The cost of energy, inflation, and other restraints have, so far, been dealt with indirectly. 
The library has not yet been forced to reduce its staff, or hours of operation. Priorities have shifted in 
coping with public expectations, and it has become increasingly difficult to maintain basic services at the 
expected level. 

It is indeed ironic that in a time of concern over high taxation, the public's expectations are ever increas- 
ing, and that the use of the Memorial Library is escalating. "More with less" appears to be the current bind 
in which the library finds itself. 

The statistics continue to show the library's growth during the seventies, as dramatically illustrated in 
1979. The staff of the library continued to respond to this growth with dedication, amiability, and flexi- 
bility despite the fact that no additional staff members were employed by the library on a full time basis. 
The staff coped with increased circulation and activity despite the vagaries of federally supported personnel 
programs. Throughout the seventies, and in 1979, the Memorial Libary and its staff performed to the best of 
its ability its classic role to serve the educational, informational, cultural and recreational needs of the 



37 



community. The library grew during the seventies, and public expectations grew in tandem. The Library's 
classic role will continue into the 1980s. The straff and public expectations will be challenged and tested 
during the 1980s. The future of the Memorial Library, as it leads and responds during the next decade, will 
depend on democratic choices, freely made and based on knowledge and information. 

LIBRARY STATISTICS 

1871 

Philip W. Meriam 
292 



of the year: 
during the year: 



Date of founding: 
Library Director: 
Number of days open during 1979: 
Hours open each week: 

Total holdings as of December 31, 1979: 

Books 71,232 
A/V materials 2,320 
Microform 2,049 
Newspapers 14 
Periodicals 269 
Art prints 203 
Realia 263 

Number of volumes beginning 

Number of volumes purchased 

Number of volumes added as gifts: 

Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 

WM (Missing from library) : 6 
WLO (Long overdue) : 282 
WW (Worn/damaged): 590 
WD (Dated): 94 

Number of volumes as of December 31, 1979: 

Population: 1979 Town Census 

Circulation: 1979 

Adult: 76,079 Children: 48,193 
Museum passes: 671 A/V: 7,364 
Periodicals: 5,433 Art prints: 640 

Circulation per capita: 

Retrospective circulation totals: 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 

Circulation control statistics: 

Number of adult reserves processed: 

Number of overdue notices sent: 

Number of bills sent: 

Number of overdue items involved: 

Number of bill items involved: 

Registered library patrons: v 
Total reference and reader service statistics for 1979: 
Retrospective reference and reader services for: 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

Interlibrary loans: 

ILL. material requested from other libraries: 
ILL material received from other libraries: 
ILL material loaned to other libraries 

Appropriations and income for 1979: 

Per capita expenditures: 

Funds transferred to Town Treasurer: 

Payment for lost library material: 463.35 
Payment received for service chgs: 1,288.00 
Payment for lost borrowers cards: 74.00 
Postage refund: 50.25 
Book order refund: 198.00 
Memorial gifts: 15.00 



69 

76,336 



67,576 
4,394 
234 
- 972 



71,232 
18,200 
138,380 



7.6 

102,186 
117,612 
113,343 
117,352 
129,828 

2,572 
9,375 
1,802 
23,769 
3,744 
9,259 
6,744 



3,158 
3,689 
3,739 
5,522 
6,006 



$2 



148 
152 
39 

!04,153 
$11.22 
088.60 



38 



Public Buildings Department 



1979 started with the discovery of asbestos in the Glen Road School. Shortly after this discovery a fire made 
the school unfit for use. Students were housed temporarily at Saint Thomas' Church. By September, asbestos 
had been removed from the building and the Glen Road School was ready for use for the new school term. The 
personnel of the Public Buildings and Grounds Department are to be credited for their herculean efforts in 
getting this school back in operation. 

Energy conservation continued to be the focus of attention. Continuous efforts were made to fine tune heating 
systems and tighten buildings as much as possible. The Mildred Rogers School and the Town Hall Annex were 
closed to cut down on fuel use. A reduction of 49,500 gallons of fuel was accomplished in 1979 over 1978, but 
the price rose sharply so the fuel budget continues upward. 

The roof maintenance program at the Shawsheen Street School was completed, adding approximately ten years to 
the life of the roof. School and Town buildings' roofs, with one exception, are in excellent condition. 
Our continued maintenance program will within the year have them all in good repair. 

Personnel from the department programmed the voting machines and set them up for the elections. 

A new condensate return system was installed in the High School heating system. This combined with the con- 
trol system installed last year resulted in more uniform heat throughout the building, and fuel savings. 

A new fertilizer and seeding program at the High School football field resulted in better turf for this season. 
It is expected that as this program continues over the next few years considerable improvement will result. 
Other fields and play areas are being maintained as well as possible within the constraints of personnel and 
budget . 

The Board of Health, Building Inspector, Town Engineer and Recreation Departments were provided office space 
in the former Whitefield School. More adequate office space was provided these departments, as well as making 
them more accessible to the public they serve. 

Vandalism was not as severe as in 1978, if window repairs can be used as a guide. One hundred and forty-two 
less windows were repaired in 1979 then in 1978. 

The Preventative Maintenance program started in 1977 has proven successful. Emergency calls have been reduced 
by 50% especially in motors, pumps and heating systems. Further reductions are expected as the personnel and 
the system becomes more experienced. 

1979 was a successful year for the Public Buildings and Grounds Department. I believe we satisfied most of 
our clients. As we go into the new decade, I and the personnel of the department are looking forward to pro- 
viding the high quality service that the building user has come to expect. Every effort will be made to pro- 
vide a safe and comfortable environment for the public, school personnel, students and town departments that 
use our buildings and grounds. 

My most sincere appreciation to the maintenance, grounds, custodial and clerical personnel for their support 
and assistance throughout the year. Without these people the job would not have been accomplished. Also, 
I thank those departments that provided assistance throughout 1979. 




Board of Health 



Thomas Morris was elected Chairman of the Board of Health again for the period 1979-1980. Joseph Paglia and I 
James Durkee comprised the other two Board members. 

... There was no change in personnel during 1979. 

... No Public Health Physician was recruited to replace Dr. Francisco. 

... The Board of Health budget increased by approximately 14%. This was due primarily to the increase in th> 
rubbish collection contract. 

... A new three year rubbish contract was signed for the rubbish collection in July with Stanley Roketenetz i 

. . . The Board continued to fund Wilmington Family Counseling which showed an increase in service at the same 
cost to the Town. 

... A total of $13,500 was budgeted for Share. 

... A new law was enacted by the State Legislature making rabies immunization for dogs mandatory in order to 
be licensed. Four hundred twenty-three (423) dogs were immunized at the annual dog clinic. 

... The Board of Health offices were relocated to the Whitefield School. 

... A Diabetic Screening Program was started at the Drop-In-Center. 

... As part of the Board's Industrial Program, a Tuberculin Testing Program was held at Sweetheart Plastics. 

. . . Assistance for a Flu Clinic was provided at a local industry. 

... A Town wide Flu Clinic was held. 

... The Board participated in Hospital Day at the New England Memorial Hospital and sponsored a hearing test, 

... Funding was discontinued for the services of legal counsel. 

... Students were accompanied to the Lawrence Experiment Station and the Food and Drug Laboratory as part of 
Good Government Day. 

... Mystic Valley continued to provide services to the Town. The Town made no funds available. 

... The Director received the Robert C. Perriello Award as the Sanitarian of the Year from the Massachusetts 
Environment Health Association. 

... The Director was reelected to the Executive Board of the Massachusetts Health Officers Association. 

. . . National Hypertension Month was observed in May by making free blood pressure tests at various drug store 
and Library. 

... Tuberculosis testing was conducted in the schools as an adjunct to the school health program. 

... Surveillance of the local chemical plants continued in 1979. 

m 

... The Board of Health met routinely on a monthly basis for the conduct of its business. 



40 



A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 



1. Monthly Immunization Clinic Attendance 30 

Home visits 23 

Office visits 63 

Head Start 13 

2 . Communicable Diseases Reported 51 

3. Flu Immunization Program Total doses administered 580 

4. Tuberculosis Report T.B. tests to High School seniors 75 

T.B. tests to children at Headstart 43 

T.B. tests to school personnel 215 

T.B. tests to local industry 237 

Office visits 162 

Home visits 35 

B. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1. Nursing visits during year 437 

Office visits 72 

2 . Premature births reported 3 

Home visits 13 

3. Newborn infants Home visits 27 

4. Hypertension Program Office visits 291 

Attendance at monthly clinic 222 

Town Employees 17 

School Personnel 88 

Location at drug stores 97 

5. Diabetic Screening Attendance at monthly clinic 50 

Town Employees 15 

Attendance at Drop-In-Center 100 

School Personnel 62 

Office visits 16 

Fees collected $230.00 

6. Drop- In-Center Number of counseling sessions 49 

Attendance 784 

7. Gentle Exercise Program Number of sessions 32 

Attendance 563 

8. General Health Supervision Home visits 1018 

C. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

1. Licenses and Permits Sewerage 95 

Food 105 

Milk (store) 66 

Milk (vehicle) 

Stable 19 

Refuse Transportation 32 

Installers 23 

Piggery 1 

Miscellaneous 64 

Fee's collected $1,960.00 

2. Food Establishments Inspections 77 



41 



C. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (continued) 



3. Complaints 

4 . Inspection of Animals 

5. Dental Clinic 

6 . Installers Examination 

7 . Sewerage 

8. International Health Certificates 



9. 
10. 

11. 
12. 

13. 
14. 



Animals quarantined 
Animals released 
Animals disposed of 

Number of children serviced 

Exams given 

Inspect ions /Investigations 



Bathing Areas 
Water Analysis 

Recreation Camps 
Court 

The Board did not fund legal services for fiscal 1980. 
Solid Waste 



Samples collected 

Samples collected 
Inspections 
Court appearances 



222 

47 
47 
331 

1222 

11 

60 3 

3 



The Board signed a new three year contract for the collection of rubbish, 
contract price for the first year was $189,000.00 



The 



Rabies Clinic 



Dogs immunized 



423 



1977 


1978 


1979 


77 


104 


106 


29 


48 


56 


106 


152 


162 


39 


58 


64 


open during 


1977, the first 


full year 



1979 (11 months) 



15 . Mystic Valley Mental Health Association 
Adults 

Child/Family 
Total 

Monthly average 



Valley served the Town. 152 clients and their families were seen during 1978. 162 
families were served during the first 11 months of 1979. The monthly average of cases 
increased from 39 in 1977 to 67 in 1979. This represents an increase of 64%. 

During the 11 Months of 1979: 

9 residents participated in the partial hospitalization program. 

8 residents received mental retardation services. 

2 children were in early intervention program. 

2 clients/families were seen by emergency services. 

8 residents were evaluated by a Mystic Valley Psychiatrist at the Woburn Center. 
149 families received outpatient services. 

11 residents were hospitalized at the Met. State Hospital. 

16. Share 

Financial Summary: 

Share's total income, January 1, - December 31, 1979, is $597,526. During this twelve 
month period, Share actually expended $16,509 in services to the residents of Wilmington 
($14,485 direct; $2,024 indirect.) That is 2.8% ($16,509 divided by $597,526) of Share's 
income went to Wilmington. Wilmington contributed $13,206 which is 2.2% of Share's 
income. For each dollar Wilmington contributed, Wilmington citizens received $1.25 in 
services . 



42 



16. Share (continued) 



Central Intake Unit 



3 Intake Evaluations x $82 . 32/client 
1 Intake Evaluation x $90 . 55/client 



Outpatient Drug-Free Counseling (24 clients ) 



278 client weeks x $24.12/week 
159 client weeks x $26.70/week 



Sub-Total 

246.96 
90. 55 



6,708.14 
4,245.30 



Other Community Services 



Parents Group 


10 





hours 


Communicating Adoles. 


2 





hours 


Evaluations 


7 





hours 


. counseling 








Girls Group 


19 





hours 


Boys Group #1 


14 





hours 


Boys Group //2 


10 





hours 


Wilm. W. Inter. 


29 





hours 


Wilm. High School 


31 


5 


hours 


Wilm. Spec. Education 




75 


hours 




123 


25 


hours 


Evaluations 


5 





hours 



28 



School Groups and In-school counseling 



Girls Group //l 


10 


5 


hours 


Girls Group #2 


3 





hours 


Boys Group ill 


3 





hours 


Wilm. W. Inter. 


24 





hours 


Wilm. N. Inter. 


22 


5 


hours 


Wilm. High School 


10 





hours 




78 





hours x $16.81 



Total 



201.25 hours 



Sub-Total 



Ancillary and indirect costs including Central Administration, Business 

Management, Clinical Supervision, and Program Evaluation. 

(13% of above total January to June - 15.5% July to December 1979. 

GRAND TOTAL 

For every dollar contributed to SHARE, Wilmington has received $1.25 in services 
Town contribution to date - January to December 1979 



Total 



$ 337.51 



$10,953.44 



= $ 3,194.44 
= $14,485.39 

= $ 2,024.28 
= $16,509.67 

= $13,206.00 



43 



17 . Wilmington Family Counseling Service, Inc . 



CLIENTS: 



Contract 



Other 



Total 



Number of families in treatment 
Average per month - 55 



98 



152 



Number of new families 
Average per month 



5.7 



Number of families returning for further treatment 
Average per month - 2.5 

Primary presenting problems 

Adult with personal emotional problem 41% 

Marital problems 22% 

Child adjustment or management problem 21% 
Adolescent adjustment or management problem 15% 

Sources of referral 

Self 35% 

Friends and family 31% 

Physicians and hospitals 3% 

Schools 10% 

Mental health professionals & agencies 9% 

Public service agencies 6% 

Clergy 0% 

Lawyers, courts, and police 6% 

Number of families terminating treatment 
Average per month - 8.3 



42 



16 



26 



14 



30 



66 



34 



100 



SERVICE 



Number of scheduled counseling and therapy sessions 
Average per month - 150 

Number of cancellations 

11% cancellation rate 



1145 



131 



659 



70 



1804 



201 



Consultation and educational services 
Specific agency or group 

Choate Hospital Inpatient Psychiatric Unit 
Department of Public Welfare 
Head Start Parents' Group 
Mass. Department of Mental Health 
Adolescent Planning Conference 
for Mystic Valley 
Office for Children 



Wilmington Public Schools 

Cost to town per' scheduled appointment: 
Decreased 31% from $10.50 in 1978 
Decreased 49% from $14.10 in 1977 
Decreased 63% from $19.67 in 1976 



$7.21 



Service 

Case Consultation 
Case Consultation 
Community Education 
Community Information 
and Planning 

Community Information 
and Planning 
Case Consultation 



Number of scheduled counseling and therapy sessions increased 9% over 1978. 



44 



Recreation Commission 



Although Recreation is as old as civilization itself, its inclusion as a primary municipal service is a 
relatively new and complex phenomenon. Society's change from "work ethic" oriented to the current and futur- 
istic leisure-oriented type has forced a reassessment of municipal functions. Recreation as a human service 
component is afforded a role of increasing importance within the changing framework of government delivery 
systems. The impact that increased leisure time is having on all of us presents a formidable challenge to the 
recreation profession as it attempts to meet current and future leisure needs of the populace. The following 
objectives of the Recreation Department serve as a guide in our efforts: 

OBJECTIVES : 

To provide opportunities for self expression 
To develop a sense of personal worth 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of challenge to 
participants 

To teach skills in various activities that will have carry-over value in later life 

To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an attempt to meet the needs 
and interests of the people being served 

The Recreation Department in its ninth year with a full time director presents the following breakdown 
on 1979 programs and services: 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Summer Playgrounds : The playgrounds of '79 again registered approximately 2,000 youngsters between the ages 
of 6 and 12. The six playgrounds ran for a seven week period on a Monday through Friday basis from 9:00 to 
3:00 p.m. each day. Each of the six playgrounds were staffed by three leaders and a youth C.E.T.A. aide. 
Individual playgrounds were responsible for implementing a wide variety of recreational activities for their 
registrants. Included as part of each playground's program were: arts and crafts, drama, interplayground 
competition, tennis, field trips, special events, family night cookouts, sports and games, tournaments and 
pool days. Special events included the Hersey Track and Field Meet at Wilmington with finalists going to 
Brockton for the State Meet, Sand Castle Sculpture Contests at Crane's Beach and Arts and Crafts Exhibit on 
the Common. Other Special Events that also took place during the playground season, were: Knights of Columbus 
Olympics, Simmon's Croquet Open, Horseshoe Tourney, Tennis Tourney, Police Association Beach and Soap Box Derby, 
a Penny Carnival at the Wildwood Playground with the proceeds once again going to the Jimmy Fund, Whiffle Ball 
Tourney, and the "Little Red Wagon" on the Common. With the help of a large group of volunteers and the 
financial* support by citizens and civic groups, this unique program as always was well received by the entire 
town. 

Tiny Tots: This pre-school program, in its third summer of operation, proved to be extremely popular. The 
Buzzell School served as the location for the program which consisted of two three-week sessions. Within 
each session there was a morning class and an afternoon class. Each session met each day for the three-week 
period. Activities included many kinds of games, songs, skits, arts and crafts, special events such as: 
Red Dox Day, Crazy Hat Day, Mickey Mouse Day, Gymnastics Lessons, Swimming Lessons, Banana Split Day, Stone 
Soup Day, Great Kiwanis Balloon Launch and Easter Bunny Visit. There were field trips to the local fire 
station and library, Drumlin Farm, New England Aquarium, and the Stoneham Zoo. A very special day for each 
child was graduation day where all the tots received their own diploma. 



45 



This program received a very high level of success which can be attributed to the many hours of planning and ; 
competent and dedicated staff. 

Special Needs : For the fifth year in succession we were fortunate in that we were allowed to use the facili- 
ties at Camp 40 Acres for this program. The program was staffed by thirteen supervisors and leaders plus 
S.P.E.D.Y. personnel and many volunteers. The youngsters were supervised almost on a one on one basis becausi 
of the large assistance we were fortunate enough to have. This program, like the playgrounds ran for seven 
weeks from Monday through Friday. Their operating times were 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Some of the many acti- 
vities at the Camp included: arts and crafts, drama, field trips, pool days, active and quiet games, family 
cookouts, overnight camping and physically corrective activities. Special events included participation in 
the Playground Olympics and Beach Day, Kiwanis Club Cookout, family night supper and awards at the Sons of 
Italy Hall and the Custodians Cookout plus the conducting of our fourth annual Super Stars Competition spon- 
sored by the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks and participated in by eight surrounding towns. This program is 50% 
reimbursable from the Commonwealth. 

Teen Center : This summer marked the fifth year of this program for local teens. The Walker School was once 
again the site for the Center with the downstairs being used as a lounge, and the two main floor classrooms 
being used as game rooms. This six week program operated on a Monday to Friday basis. Over 300 youths in 
grades 7 to 12 participated in the program which consisted of active and quiet games, tournaments, field 
hockey clinics, disco dance night, field trips to Hampton Beach, the Bal-A-Roue, Fenway Park and an overnight 
camping trip to Pawtuckaway State Park in New Hampshire. 

Baseball : Our Northeast Baseball League team was made up of local boys between the ages of 15 and 18. The 
team played a 24 game schedule in a 9 team division within the league. All home games were played on the 
High School field during their playing season which ran from June through July. Coaches and managers for the 
team volunteered their services with the team finishing with an 18-6 record, good enough for 2nd place. 

Sof tball : During the summer months of June, July and August, girls between the ages of 13 and 16 played 
Softball in our intra-town league. Approximately 100 girls participated in this six team intra-town league, 
games were played at the Town Park on Tuesday and Saturdays. Each team played a 15 game schedule in a con- 
cluding round-robin tournament. The Travelling team played in the Middlesex League with home games being 
played on Tuesday and Friday evenings at the Town Park. 

Six teams of boys, ages 13 to 17 formed our intra-town "one pitch" league. Over 100 boys participated this 
year. Their games were played on Sundays at the High School's Junior Varsity Field. They played a 10 game 
schedule with playoffs concluding the season on July 1. All of the coaches served on a volunteer basis. 

Town Beach : Residents of all ages made use of the Silver Lake beaches. Qualified lifeguards supervised the 
public beach seven days a week from June through Labor Day. The Town is fortunate to have such a valuable 
natural recreation asset within its borders. 

Swimming Lessons : The Recreation Department once again used the fine swimming facilities at the Shawsheen 
Tech Pool throughout the year for youth Red Cross lessons, adult swim and family swim as well as for special 
occasions such as the Jr. Winter Carnival. Swimming Lessons were also held at Silver Lake. Classes there 
included beginners, advanced beginner, intermediate, water safety aide and advanced life saving. Over 200 
youths were involved in these summer lessons. Our entire lesson programs is extremely beneficial as more and 
more people are becoming involved in water oriented recreation. 

Canoeing : The Recreation Department offered Red Cross Canoeing lessons in July and August at Silver Lake. 
The classes met on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. A former U.S. Olympic Coach gave valuable lecture and 
demonstration to the class on one occasion. The canoes were also available for rental to the general public. 

Basketball : In its sixteenth year, our winter league registered approximately 500 people from ages 9 on up. 
There were 44 teams in the three youth divisions and men's divisions. Games during the season, which ran from 
December through March, were played on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings plus most of the day on Saturda 
and Sunday. Approximately 100 volunteers served as coaches and officials for this league. 

Girls' teams practiced on Wednesday evenings from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the North Intermediate Gym and Thursday 
in the High School Gym. Women practiced in the same gym from 8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Boys' teams practiced in the 
West Intermediate School Gym on Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. while the men practiced in that gym from 
8:00 to 10:00 p.m. 

There were three clinics held for squirt boys (ages 9 and 10) in December and three clinics for squirt girls 
(ages 9 and 10) in January. The clinics were run by volunteers. 



46 



Tennis Lessons : Our tennis lessons program proved to be an extremely popular program once again. There were 
four, three week sessions for local residents between the ages of 9 and up. The program ran from May through 
August with Youth Classes being held on Saturdays and Adult Classes meeting on Monday and Wednesday evenings. 

Gymnastics : There were two sessions this year, a summer and fall program for girls. Girls ages 4 through 
12 participated in these programs. Over 200 girls learned basic and more advanced maneuvers by participating 
in this popular program. 

Baton : Lessons for girls ages 5 through grade 12 were held throughout the winter on Wednesday afternoons and 
Saturdays. Over 30 of these twirlers participated as a unit in the Memorial Day Parade and the Veterans Day 
Parade . 

Another 10 week, Saturday program was held on Saturdays in the fall at the American Legion Hall. 

Soccer : Our two spring soccer teams for boys competed in the Middlesex Youth Soccer League. The A team for 
boys ages 15 and under played on Sunday while the B team, comprised of boys ages 13 and under, played on 
Saturdays. The season ran from April through mid-June with home games being played at the Shawsheen School. 

A new intramural, instructional program was initiated in September. The program showed the 150 plus boys in 
grades 1 to 6 the basic fundamentals of individual and team play. The program was conducted by volunteers and 
was held on Saturdays at the Shawsheen School. 

Elementary Open Gyms : The Shawsheen and Woburn Street School Gyms were open to grades 1 through 6 on Saturday 
mornings from January into March. A variety of active sports and games were available for the children. The 
gyms are usually filled to capacity during the open gym hours. 

Intermediate Open Gyms : Both the North and West Intermediate School Gyms were utilized by intermediate age 
students on Saturday afternoons from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Basketball, gym hockey and tumbling were available 
to participants. This program also ran from January into March. 

Teen Open Gym : The Woburn Street School Gym was open on Saturdays from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. for grades 9 to 12. 
The program ran from January into March. The principle activity was basketball. 

Bowling : This is an extensive school year program which runs out of Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. The 
program ran every weekday after school starting in October and ending in March. Included were grades 4 through 
12. Each school and bowler participated once a week. Bowlers received bus transportation from their school 
to the lanes and back to the vicintiy of each bowler's home, plus 2 strings of bowling, a bowling shirt, in- 
struction, supervision and a chance to win one of many trophies. 

Santa's Workshop : Over 350 good little boys and girls visited Santa and his elves at their Workshop in the 
former Mildred Rogers School. Children were able to sit on Santa's lap and receive a color snapshot with 
Santa. They also received a candy cane, a helium filled Christmas balloon and a chance to win prizes from 
under Santa's Christmas tree. All donations received during the program were sent to Globe Santa. 

Ski Lessons : This was a self supporting program for boys and girls in grades 4 to 6. The program consisted 
of 5 Wednesday afternoon classes at Boston Hills in North Andover. Fifty skiers of varying abilities took 
part in this very successful program. On the last day of class, races were held as was a little ski party 
in the lodge. 

Universal : There was a 10 week exercise program in the fall for high school boys and girls utilizing the new 
Universal exercise machine which was donated to the Town by the Rotary Club. 

Others : The Recreation Department either sponsored or participated in the following programs for Wilmington 
youth: vacation programs, ski trips including an overnight to Vermont, dances, Jr. Winter Carnival, Celtics 
trips, Easter Egg Hunt, free public skating, Memorial Races, Horribles Parade, Student Government Day, Punt 
Pass and Kick, Fun Runs and the Boston Globe Ski Clinic. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 

Men's Open Gym : Men, over 18, were able to participate in an informal gym program on Thursday evenings from 
8:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the West Intermediate School Gym. This program is usually well attended and runs from 
November through March. 



47 



Basketball : Men competed in a separate league within the Basketball League. Their games were played in the 
High School Gym on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. The season began in December and lasted 
through March. 



Ladies Open Gym : Ladies, ages 18 and over, had the use of the North Intermediate Gym on Wednesday evenings 
from 8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Informal basketball was the activity provided. The program ran from early December 
through March. 

Co-Ed Volleyball : This popular co-ed adult program ran on Thursday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in the 
North Intermediate School Gym. The program ran from January through March and was well attended. 

Softball : A very active and successful men's Softball league was conducted over the summer at the Town Park. 
This entire program is supervised and conducted by volunteers spending much valuable time to insure the con- 
tinued success of this program. 

Yoga : This was a new exercise program for adults. There were two classes which met in four separate 8 week 
sessions throughout the year. 

Ladies Slimnastics : This is a popular exercise program for the ladies. There was a 10 week program beginning 
in January and a 12 week program beginning in October. The classes are always full. 

Disco Dancing : Ten week sessions were held in the winter, spring and fall. The winter program consisted of 
four disco classes. The spring classes again were made up of four classes. In the fall there were two adult 
disco classes meeting weekly. 

Concerts : Music filled the air around the Common during the summer of 1979. There were ten concerts held 
with many residents of all ages coming to enjoy a family outing. Sponsors were: Sweetheart Plastics, W.G. 
Leavitt and Son, Compugraphic , Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, F & R Auto Supply, Fred F. Cain, Charles River 
Breeding Labs, DeMoulas Supermarkets, Bedell Brothers Insurance, The Kiwanis Club and Wilmington Ford. 

Universal : We began formal use of the Rotary Club donated exercise machine inthe fall with a 10 week program. 
Men and ladies had separate classes. 

Others : Additional adult programs involving the Recreation Department were: Fun Runs and Running Clinics, 
use of the Town Beaches, Boston Globe Ski Clinic, tennis lessons, canoe lessons and rental, Memorial Weekend 
Races, public skating and Celtics games. 

The Recreation Director was also involved in the planning and running of a Physical Fitness Week at the new 
Regional Health Center. 

COMMUNITY YOUTH 

Several youth organizations in town received partial financial support through the Recreation Department 
budget. These excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time in helping our younge 
people receive enjoyment through recreation activity. These organizations are Youth Hockey, Figure Skating CI 
Pop Warner, Senior Little League, Pony League, Soccer and Tennis Club. 




48 



Planning Board 



The Wilmington Planning Board meets each Tuesday night at the Town Hall Annex, and its office is open three 
days a week. 

The Wilmington Planning Board continues to serve the Town of Wilmington to the best of its ability. 

For the entire year of 1979, the Planning Board has functioned without the services of a Planning Assistant. 
It has become more evident during these times, that the Planning Board Secretary has shown the ability and 
experience that was needed. Professional services which may be needed from time to time, can be hired on a 
consultant basis. Thus, the in-house services being more completely utilized, the Planning Board will lower 
its budget requirements for the coming year. 

The following being some of our involvements and endeavors for 1979. 
General Planning 

1. The Planning Board has continued to rework and revise the P.R.D. By-Law. This enabling Act By-Law has 
been transformed to meet the needs of the town as a whole. This was achieved by first contracting a Profess- 
ional Consultant and forming a Steering Committee. The Steering Committee consisted of Selectman, Rocco De 
Pasquale; Barbara Larson of the Housing Authority; Arnold Blake and John DeRoy of the Planning Board. The 
Planning Board as a whole, then worked with the consultant and the Steering Committee input, to construct the 
By-Law. This completed By-Law will be submitted to the Annual 1980 Town Meeting. 

2. 1-93 Corridor Study : Throughout the year, the Planning Board has been constantly involved in the 1-93 
Corridor Study. The Planning Board will continue to be involved in order to support Wilmington. The Resi- 
dents of Wilmington and the Industries of Wilmington, shall be the first concern of the Planning Board. 

3. A special report was completed by the Planning Board Secretary at the request of the Board. The intent 

of the study was to examine the success or failure of Rezoning Articles. The time span was from the inception 
in 1970 of the Master Plan to the present, 1979. This information being valuable information at hand for the 
Planning Board, i.e.: 1970 - 1979, 43 Rezoning Articles were proposed at Town Meeting. Thirteen articles 
were approved, 15 disapproved, and 15 were passed over, less than 30% in favor on Town Meeting vote. 

4. The Planning Board has been involved in the Flood Insurance Program. This has brought Wilmington and its 
Boards and Commissions a fine flood insurance boundary map. The best we have to date. 

5. The Planning Board is conducting a project to define the best use of existing Town-owned land. The major 
concern of the Planning Board was the search for open-land in assisting the Housing Authority's request for 
space to develop housing for the elderly. A map was prepared indicating 15 acre or more parcels to be used 
by the board in future land use studies. The Planning Board interest in open-space increased, and further 
study shall be needed. 

6. The Planning Board assisted, if only in a small way. towards the application for a Community Development 
Block Grant by the Assistant Town Manager. The Planning Board continues to assist these endeavors for town 
betterments . 

Subdivisions and Plans 1979 

1. The Planning Board received 75 plans and applications for (approval not required under Subdivision Control 
Law). Planning Board endorsement: 72 plans were approved, 1 plan was disapproved, 1 Planning Board chose no 
action, 1 plan was withdrawn without prejudice. 

2. In keeping with the responsibility of Section IV-F of the Zoning By-Laws, the Planning Board reviewed and 
Imade recommendations on 13 parking plans submitted to the Board by the Town Engineer. 



49 



3. No new subdivision plans were submitted to the Planning Board throughout 1979. The Board has been 
keeping a concerned interest on the status of existing incomplete subdivisions. 

The coming year that brings new challenges and demands from the Planning Board, are looked upon with eager- 
ness and sincerity by the entire members; for the Town and its people, which they serve. 

• 

John W. DeRoy, Chairman 
William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Louis A. Maglio, Jr. 
Kenneth J. Miller 
Arnold C. Blake 




Redevelopment Authority 



Mrs. Currie Johnson was reappointed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to serve another term on the 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. 

The fruits of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority's efforts were realized in 1979 when Altron, Inc., who 
had expanded their buildings to nearly double its present size in 1978; increased the number of their 
employees to approximately four hundred. 

With Altron, Inc., J.B.F. Scientific and Harwich Chemical now occupying the Park, the total assessed valuatioi 
to the Town of Wilmington is now $671,000, as compared to approximately $500 when the Park was first started 
in 1973. 

The Planning Board took control of the security funds for the completion of Jewell Drive and the Board hopes 
to sell the remaining acreage in the Park in 1980 thus finalizing this project. 



50 



Conservation Commission 



This was another busy year for the Wilmington Conservation Commission, with a schedule which included 28 
regular meetings, 18 Wetland Protection Act hearings, and 260 on-site inspections. Members attended two 
prehearing conferences with the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering in Boston and 6 on-site 
inspections with state DEQE officials. In addition to actual hearings, much of the Commission's time is 
spent in consultations, with prospective applicants at their request, as a courtesy, and as a means of ex- 
plaining wetland considerations. In the case of potential or actual violations of the Act, the Commission 
explains the intent of the Wetland Protection Act and the various wetland interests which the Commission is 
required to protect. 

In order to maintain communication and encourage co-operation on projects of mutual concern, members of the 
Commission attend many meetings of other town boards. On a regional basis, membership and participation in 
a number of environmentally-related organizations, such as, Massachusetts Association of Conservation 
Commissions , Massachusetts Forests and Parks, Conservation Law Foundation and the Ipswich River Watershed 
Association provides valuable information, opportunity for exchange of ideas and sources of help which enable 
the Commission to carry out its responsibilities more effectively. 

During the past year, the Commission was active in the preliminary meetings of the HUD Flood Insurance Mapping 
for the town, seeking public input on the maps and sponsoring a public information meeting on this HUD program, 
which the town will be asked to accept at the Town Meeting. Although only the major tributaries of the Ipswich 
and Shawsheen Rivers, the maps will be another helpful resource for the Commission. The intent of the HUD 
program is to save money and lives by limiting the amount and type of development in floodprone areas via an 
insurance program, rather than by flood disaster relief. The town must accept the program in order to be 
assured of other federal monies for projects, which impact these flood prone areas. 

In another effort to protect wetland values and the water supply, the Commission requested support from 
Representative Miceli and Senator Buell, along with efforts of other town officials, in seeking funding from 
the State for a salt storage shed. Wilmington will receive a share ($30,000.) of the appropriated state 
funding to house the deicing salts, thus preventing the undesireable leaching of this material into the 
wetlands, as well as loss of dissolved salt when it stands open to rain and snow as in the past. 

In the area of land acquisition, the Commission received the donation of 6 acres of wetland from Senpek Realty 
Corporation. The town, also, receives reimbursement of $3,800. from the state for the purchase of Conservation 
land . 

Student Government Day found two Commission members escorting 5 students on a tour of the Deer Island Sewerage 
Treatment Plant, and then joining other student government officials for a tour of the State House with 
Representative Miceli. Participating students are strongly encouraged to attend as many Commission meetings 
as possible and then report on their impressions and what they have learned from the experience. 

Believing that the education and encouragement of youth in areas of conservation and ecology are increasingly 
important, members had been looking for a camping program, which would offer this valuable experience for 
girls as well as for boys. Since the funding for conservation camp was eliminated from the Conservation 
Commission budget, this past year, we were unable to sponsor any students, as had been done in previous 
years. However, the Commission would be glad to share its information on the opportunities available for 
individuals and families. 

The Commission wishes to thank the many townspeople and officials who have displayed an interest in the wetland 
resources of their town. 

Membership remained stable during the past year and the Commission welcomes the support of new associate 
member, Larry Labrie. 



51 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel covering 
the year 1979. 

(a) On January 1, 1979, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of 
actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien 
foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal 
for variance by zoning by-laws). 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) . 

Joseph Scaro, etal v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Court (Petition for registration and 
claim to Swain Court - Private Way) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for failure 
to comply with final decree). 

Richard D. Zambernardi, etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit in 
equity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment). 

Town of Wilmington v. Oxford Associates, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court (Claim to recover motor vehicle 
excise taxes) . 

Harry S. Sukeforth, etals, Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Petition for assessment of damages). 

Else M. Lanois v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages for 
land taking) . 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (Action for property damage - 
negligence) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Appeals Court (Bill of complaint for declaratory relief 
as to the validity of a sewer betterment assessment) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Appeals Court (Bill of complaint for declaratory relief 
as to the validity of Assessment of sewer use charges, for recovery of damages and for injunctive relief). 

George Anderson, etal v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claims for 
personal injury). 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Complaint of 
discrimination as to benefits). 

52 



John J. Lyons, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Complaint to determine validity and extent of the 
zoning by-laws of the town of Wilmington). 

George W. Lloyd, etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc., etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for alleged 
damages resulting from diversion of water). 

James Zaccagnini v. James Marsi, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint alleging libel by police officer in 
the performance of his duties) . 

Edward W. Powers, etal v. Town of Milton, etal, Supreme Judicial Court (Declaratory judgment to determine 
constitutionality of Civil Service Statute). 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer betterment assessment). 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer use charge) . 

Rosaline T. Abi-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee, etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination 
(Claim for payment of maternity benefits). 

Joseph J. Salpietro, etal v. Robert E. Shelley, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injury 
and property damage) . 

Alice Papaliolios v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for invasion of privacy 
and defamation). 

Donald Robbins, Trustee v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) . 

James Zaccagnini v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, U.S. District Court of Massachusetts (Suit alleging viola- 
tion of plaintiff's civil rights). 

Town of Wilmington v. Rosnoe Construction Corp., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the 
removal of soil, loam, sand or gravel from defendant's premises). 

Gibbs Realty and Development Corporation v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from 
decision of Board of Appeals denying building permit). 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (Complaint alleg- 
ing sex discrimination) . 

Dorothy A. Cosman v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injury). 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc., etals v. Aldo Caira, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action 
in the nature of certiorari for decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) . 

Ruth J. Gronemeyer, Exec, v. George R. Allan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for assessment of 
damages) . 

James Rooney v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (Appeal from decision of 
Civil Service Commission sustaining appointing authority) . 

Wilmington Town Employees Association, Inc. and Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association 
(Demand for arbitration of contract provisions). 

Traffic Supervisors (AFSCME, Council 93) and Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commissio n (Mediation and 
fact f inding) . 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1980, 55 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

(b) (1) During the year 1979, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington or 

53 



(b) (1) During the year 1979, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington or 
its officers or agents: 

AFSCME, Council 93, Local 1703 v. Town of Wilmington, Board of Conciliation and Arbitration (Fact finding 
after labor negotiations impasse). 

Beverly Doyle, etals v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals granting special permit for use of premises for research and testing laboratory including 
raising and keeping of animals) . 

Lucille Costa, etal v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action for personal injury 
from motor vehicle accident). 

George Donovan, etal v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from the decision of the 
Board of Appeals denying variance to construct a single family dwelling). 

George R. Vinal, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Action of quantum merit to 
recover fair and reasonable value of services provided to Jewell Mfg. Company, Inc. for subdivision road and 
utilities and/or to reach and apply monies held by the Town of Wilmington) . 

James Martin v. Derek Little, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for non-payment of wages 
by former teacher) . 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court (Claim for breach of 
contract) . 

School Teacher v. Wilmington School System, Commission Against Discrimination (Claim for sex discrimina- 
tion) . 

AFSCME, Council 93, Cemetery Employees v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (Claim for unit 
recognition) . 

Pacella Bros., Inc. v. Town of Wilmington Water and Sewer Commissioners, American Arbitration Association 
(Demand for arbitration on sewer construction project). 

Labor Relations Commission v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint to enforce order of 
Labor Relations Commission) . 

(b) (2) During the year 1979, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town. 

Town of Wilmington v. AFSCME, Council 93, Labor Relations Commission , (Complaint for declaratory judgment 
to determine rights) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Albert Silva, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for personal prop- 
erty tax) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Labor Relations Commission, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for judicial review 
of decision of Labor Relations Commission) . 

Aldo A. Caira, etals v. Bioassay Systems Corp., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of 
the Board of Appeals granting special permit for use of premises for research and testing laboratory including 
raising and keeping of animals). 

(c) During the year 1979, the following actions by or against the Town were disposed of. 

James Zaccagnini v. James Marsi, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of execution by 
payment of $22,000.00). 

Donald Robbins, Trustee v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction 
of execution of the Court in the amount of $51,494.12 after jury trial). 

James Zaccagnini v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, U.S. District Court of Massachusetts (Disposed of by dis- 
missal with prejudice). 

54 



Town of Wilmington v. Albert Silva, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by satisfac- 
tion of execution of the Court in the amount of $402.09). 



AFSCME, Council 93, Cemetery Employees v. Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (Disposed of by 
withdrawal of claim) . 

AFSCME, Council 93, Local 1703 v. Town of Wilmington, Board of Conciliation and Arbitration (Disposed of 
by fact finders report filed with both parties). 

Bevery Doyle, etals v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment for the 
plaintiffs annuling decision of the Board of Appeals). 

Aldo A. Caira, etals v. Bioassay Systems Corp., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment 
for the plaintiffs annuling decision of the Board of Appeals). 

James Martin v. Derek Little, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by application 
being dismissed for want of probable cause) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Appeals court (Disposed of by decision of Appeals Court 
declaring betterment invalid) . 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Disposed of 
by withdrawal of claim) . 

Edward W. Powers etal v. Town of Milton, etal, Supreme Judicial Court (Disposed of by decision of Court 
declaring statute constitutional). 

Alice Papaliolios v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by dismissal with 
prej udice) . 

Wilmington Town Employees Association, Inc. and Town of Wi'lmington, American Arbitration Association 
(Disposed of by award of Arbitration finding Town's violation of collective bargaining agreement concerning 
overtime work of Cemetery Department employees) . 




Installing Christmas Lights on Town Common 



55 



Council on Aging 



Services and programs are offered to the elderly person of Wilmington through the Council on Aging, consisting 
of an eleven member board, its co-ordinator and senior aide. They work together to operate and maintain senio 
programs, which help the elder citizen who might be in need of assistance to function independently in their 
own homes or to enjoy programs oriented to the social welfare and happiness of the senior citizen. 

The Council on Aging budget, voted on at the Annual Town Meeting, finances the operation of all programs for 
the seniors. The services and programs are co-ordinated through the Senior Citizen Drop-In-Center. The 
Center has been donated to the seniors through the generosity of Mike DeMoulas of the DeMoulas Supermarkets. 
The Center is utilized by 1300-1500 seniors a month. 

The Council through their budget have purchased a mini-bus, which is used to transport seniors to doctors, 
dentist, hospitals, social service agencies, hot lunch site, the Drop-In-Center and other elderly related 
appointments. In the course of a month between 400-600 persons will utilize the mini-bus service. 

The senior citizen hot-lunch program has a two-fold purpose for Wilmington seniors. It delivers hot lunches 
to senior citizen shut-ins and serves a hot lunch to other seniors at the North Intermediate School. Every 
month between 500-600 meals are delivered to shut-ins and 300-400 meals served at the North Intermediate 
School . 

Scheduled activities are available to Wilmington senior citizens. They include swimming at the Shawsheen 
Valley Technical High School, exercise program at the Knights of Columbus Hall, bowling at the North Reading 
Lanes, arts and crafts lessons, dancing lessons, bi-monthly whist parties and cards, television, checkers, 
music, reading, socializing and coffee and goodies are available every day from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the 
Drop- In-Center . 

Many guest speakers are invited to the Drop-In-Center throughout the year. These speakers will focus on 
topics of special interest to our senior citizens. 

The year 1979 brought an increase in the Winterization Program. With the increase cost of fuel many of our 
seniors had their homes insulated through this program. The Fuel Assistance Program in 1979 allowed many of 
our seniors to receive assistance with their fuel bills. 

The Council on Aging pays annual dues to the MinuteMan Home Care Corp. In return the elderly in Wilmington 
receive assistance in such forms as homemaker services, chore workers, legal help, medical transportation 
outside of our mini-bus area and rehabilitation services. Nema Miller serves on the Board of M.M.H.C. as a 
director and Josephine Carlson serves as an alternate director. 

The year of 1979 saw an increase in all our social programs, these include the Friendly Visiting Association, 
Dial a Friend, Sunshine Ladies, personal counseling, Vial of Life and the Council on Aging and Woburn District 
Court youth"Work for Seniors Program". These services have been developed with the cooperation of many organ- 
izations, including the Woburn District Court, Mystic Valley Mental Health, surrounding Councils on Aging, the 
Wilmington Board of Health and many volunteers from the community, and the senior volunteers themselves. 

Throughout the year the seniors have many socials sponsored by the Council on Aging or donated to the seniors 
by many businesses, clubs and churches in the Town of Wilmington. These include trips to places of interest 
such as: The Quincy Market, Weir's boat trip, Harbor Cruise, plays, circus, dinner shows, Red Sox games, 
Halloween Party, Sweetheart's Ball, and the Christmas party all sponsored by the Council on Aging. 

A dinner dance donated by the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks, Christmas party donated by Sweetheart Plastics Co. 
and a picnic donated by St. Dorothy's Parish, periodic Masses and refreshments are also donated by St. Dorothy' 
Parish . 



56 




Housing Authority 



During 1979, under the Chairmanship of Barbara H. Larson, and 
Borrazzo, Vice Chairman George W. Hooper, Secretary Lorraine 
Treasurer Melvin F. Keough, and Administrative Assistant Sand 
seek Federal funding to obtain additional housing for the eld 
fact the State had, in past years, rejected applications for 
Wilmington was located. The efforts of the Authority's membe 
has been granted approval to construct 80 units of elderly ho 
liminary paper work and search for Developers and land to loc 
Developer has been selected and the location has been specifi 
to the various Town Boards for their review; and finally the 
townspeople for acceptance. 



with the help of the Executive Director Henry E. 
C. Brozyna, Treasurer Kevin J. McMillan, Assistant 
ra H. Walsh, the efforts of the Authority were to 
erly. This path was decided upon because of the 
housing due to the funding district in which 
rship were successful, and as a result, Wilmington 
using and 25 units of family housing. The pre- 
ate and build the units are underway. Once the 
ed, all details of the Project will be presented 
entire package of facts will be presented to the 



A public relations effort was launched to explain, express and dispel confusion and misconceptions as to 
what impact these projects would have on the Community. It was expressly written into the Federal proposal 
that 15% of the total cost of the Project funds would be required to be spent in the Town of Wilmington for 
the purpose of purchasing materials, supplies and services. It is the intention of the Authority Members and 
Chairperson Larson to significantly aid the economic structure of the Community with an impact of $515,009.00 
for business. 

Representative James Miceli was successful in his efforts to redistrict Wilmington so that future State fund- 
ing will be less difficult to obtain. As a result, Wilmington will be vying with communities similar in size. 

An extensive Modernization Program continues at Deming Way with the finalization of the water purification 
system and the weatherization program and rehabilitation of roofs. Modifications were made to the septic 
system and chloridation treatment station. 

An intensification and focusing of social programs have been introduced as well as the formation of a person- 
alized service program, with personnel funded through the CETA Program, to provide physical services to the 
residents of Deming Way. 

Chairperson Barbara H. Larson, Vice Chairman George W. Hooper, Secretary Lorraine C. Brozyna, Treasurer 
Kevin J. McMillan and Assistant Treasurer Melvin F. Keough express their appreciation for the cooperation the 
Authority has received from the various Town Boards and Administration Department, and are looking to 1980 to 
see the construction and occupancy of the new units thus bringing some relief to the ever swelling list of 
needy, elderly and handicapped applicants for housing. 

Organization 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121B of the General Laws, as amended. 
Statutory Reference 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 1954, as amended. 



57 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 19 79 



667-1 



ASSETS 



Administration Fund 

Accounts Receivable 

Investments 

Prepaid Insurance 

Prepaid Retirement 

Modernization Award 

Development Cost 

Less: Dev. Cost Liquidation 



4,533.19 
2,096.83 
12,471.48 
567.87 
351.00 

5 75,000.00 
135,000.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



4,533.19 
2,096.83 
12,471.48 

981.87 
56,127.44 

440,000.00 
516,147.81 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Accounts Payable 


7,623 


94 






Employee' Payroll Deductions 


501 


30 


8,125 


24 


Tenants Prepaid Rents 


71 


00 


71 


00 


Grants Authorized 






440,000 


00 


Notes Issued 


135,000 


00 






Less: Notes Retired 


135,000 


00 





00 


Modernization Grant 






56,033 


25 


Capital Reserve 


17,027 


19 






Operating Reserve 


15,793 


61 


32,820 


80 


Residual Receipts (Deficits) 






(20,902 


48) 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



516,147.81 



ASSETS 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1979 



705-1 



Administration Fund 
Accounts Receivable 
Investments 
Prepaid Insurance 
Prepaid Retirement 
Development Cost 



3,505.21 
121.00 
12,020.67 
79.47 
39.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



3,505.21 
121.00 
12,020.67 

118.47 
185,000.00 
200,765.35 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Accounts Payable - 
Accounts Payable - 
Accounts Payable - 
Grants Authorized 
Operating Reserve 



Development 

667-1 

Vendors 



Residual Receipts (Deficits) 



8,709.20 
669.49 
760.27 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1979 



SECTION 8 



10,138.96 
185,000.00 
11,713.03 

(6,086.64 ) 
200,765.35 



ASSETS 



Cash - General Fund 
Accounts Receivable 
Prepaid Insurance 
Deferred Charges 



198.55 
250.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



2,730.07 
11.44 

448.55 
3,190.06 



58 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1979 SECTION 8 (continued) 



LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND SURPLUS 

Withholding Taxes 28.88 

Accounts Payable - HUD 0.00 

Accounts Payable - 667-C 57.00 57.00 

Prepaid Annual Contributions 7,636.00 
Unreserved Surplus (83,226.35) 

Operating Reserve 0.00 

Project Account 32,826.89 

Cumulative HUD Contributions 50,341.11 (58.35) 

Interest Income 40.03 

Administrative Expenses (407.50) 

Housing Assistance Payments (4 , 106 . 00 ) (4 , 513 . 50 ) 

TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND SURPLUS 3,190.06 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1979 MODERNIZATION 

ASSETS . 

Modernization Fund 9,112.70 
Modernization Costs 79 , 253. 01 

TOTAL ASSETS 88,365.71 



LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND SURPLUS 

Contract Retentions 
Modernization Grants 
Administrative Expenses 

TOTAL LIABILITIES, 



0.00 
88,367.71 
(2.00 ) 

RESERVES AND SURPLUS 88,365.71 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted: 



Event 


Posted 


Date 


Town Meeting 


6 places 


February 16, 1979 


Adjourned Town Meeting 


6 places 


April 11, 1979 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


April 11, 1979 


Adjourned Town Meeting 


6 places 


May 20, 1979 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


September 11, 1979 



We have also served and posted notices for the Town and other of its officers and departments. 



59 



Historical Commission 



In this 250th anniversary year of the incorporation of the Town of Wilmington, the Historical Commission hopes 
that all of the Town's citizenry will become more aware of the many historically significant attributes of 
their surroundings. Hoping to illuminate some of the more important structures and sites, this past year the 
Commission has been preparing an historic site map of the Town which, when completed, will be made available 
to anyone wishing a copy. In conjunction with this map, historic house and site markers are being prepared 
for many of Wilmington's oldest homes and interesting sites so that they will be easily identifiable. 

It seems that each year much of the energy of the Historical Commission is directed toward the administration 
and care of historic Harnden Tavern. This year the Commission is delighted to announce that the color history 
analysis of the paint for most of the interior of the building has been completed. This color analysis was 
conducted by Dr. Judith Selwyn, a former associate of The Society for the Preservation of New England Antiqui- 
ties (Dr. Selwyn was seen on Channel 2 this year doing a similar study for the program "This Old House") . As 
a result of Dr. Selwyn 1 s study, paint in the proper period shades for each room has been purchased, and it is 
hoped that painting can begin shortly. 

The Commission is excited about this project, since it feels that the rooms in their original colors will give 
the viewer a better perception of what life was like in Wilmington in the past. Various new furnishings have 
been acquired for the Tavern, either through donation or purchase, and the upstairs bedroom is finally taking 
shape. Mr. Foster Balser, a member of the Commission, has restored the rope bed (which has stood in the cornel 
for several years now), and an old-time feather bed has been supplied by Mr. and Mrs. John TenDyke. This room 
also contains the bulk of a textile collection on loan from friends of the Tavern. 

Oft times projects fail due to lack of perserverance . Such is not the case regarding the long-planned stone- 
wall for Harnden Tavern. Thanks to the persistent efforts of Chairman Frank Curley and Evelyn Kaminski, all 
of the groundwork is complete. Warren Newhouse, local stonemason, has been engaged to build the wall using 
stones donated to the Tavern by Camp 40 Acres, and the stonewall will be in place by spring. 

As always, the Commission has sought to aid the Friends of Harnden Tavern in any way possible, and has done 
so again this year with respect to the various social and fund-raising events held at the Tavern. The Comm- 
ission urges the townspeople to attend and support the programs offered by the "Friends", since a great deal 
of time and effort go into the planning of each of these events. Aside from furnishings donated by local 
residents, these fund-raisers are the major means by which much-needed furniture can be acquired for the 
Tavern. 

The Commission is pleased that each year the Harnden Tavern is used by more and more local school and scout 
groups, as well as the general public. As the price of gasoline continues to escalate, travel to historic 
areas, such as Sturbridge Village, is becoming an impossibility for many. It makes sense that local museum 
facilities, such as the Harnden Tavern, should be used to educate those who seek an historical link with the 
past. However, the responsibility for the success of a local historical museum must rest with its local 
citizens, and the Commission urges anyone interested in promoting the development of historic Harnden Tavern 
to attend either the meetings of the Historical Commission or the meetings of the Friends of Harnden Tavern. 



60 



Carter Lecture Fund 



1980 is a milestone for the Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee. Following is a brief history from 
early records. 

The Donor, Mrs. Sarah Davis (Jaquith) Carter, was born in Wilmington on March 24, 1832, daughter of Joshua and 
Sabra (Gowing) Jaquith of the stock of early settlers of the town. She was married to Cyrus Lewis Carter on 
February 5, 1874 in Wilmington, and died in Wilmington on November 28, 1907. 

Following is the bequest contained in Mrs. Carter's will, which bore the date of November 26, 1907, and was 
admitted to Probate in Middlesex County, December 24, 1907: 

"Eleventh: I give and bequeath to the Town of Wilmington the sum of Six Thousand Dollars, in trust to 
invest the principal sum and to expend the income in maintaining courses of lectures for the benefit 
of the people of Wilmington. I direct that the principal of this fund shall be invested only in such 
securities as may be a lawful investment for Savings Banks in this Commonwealth except that it shall 
not be loaned on the security of individual names. And should the principal of said trust fund be 
lessened by depreciation in the value of the securities in which the investment may be made, or by 
leases, then the income accruing from the investments shall be allowed to accumulate and to be 
capitalized until the fund shall be restored to its original value of Six Thousand Dollars." 

Town Meeting, March 1, 1909 - At the request of the Executor of Mrs. Carter's will the warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting in Wilmington on March 1, 1909, contained the following: 

"Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the bequest contained in the will of the late Sarah 
D. J. Carter, and determine how the same shall be cared for." 

The Town Clerk's record of the meeting tells of the following action: 

"Article 18. On motion it was unanimously voted that the Town of Wilmington accepts the legacy of Mrs. 
S. D. J. Carter, and that the same be placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds for 
investment, and the income derived therefrom be paid annually to a committee consisting of five members 

Lowell Thomas, Thornton Burgess and Branson DeCoue were among those on some of the earlier programs. More 
recently Dr. Murray Banks, Rear Admiral Donald B. MacMillan, Captain Irving Johnson, Malcolm Maynard Miller, 
Stanton Waterman and John Roberts were with us. 

Mr. Kenneth Wilson arranged a program - "AN EVENING OF MUSIC FROM ERIN" - with the Reverend Francis Strahan for 
March 16, 1979. However because of illness, Mr. Wilson was unable to be with us. The Reverend Rodney Copp, 
organist, accompanied Father Strahan, who sang many numbers and lead the audience in a Sing-a-Long. It was 
an excellent program and was followed by a standing ovation. 

As so many were disappointed that Mr. Wilson could not be with us last year, the committee has requested him 
to arrange a return engagement for Father Strahan. We are very pleased to announce that Father Strahan and 
Mr. Wilson; both graduates of the New England Conservatory of Music, will present a program at the United 
Methodist Church, 8:15 Friday Evening, May 2, 1980. 



61 



Accepted Streets 

i 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Adams Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 






Adelaide Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 






Agostino Drive 


from 


Gandalf Way 


999 


1979 






Aldr ich Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6, 740 


1894 






Allen Park Drive 


from 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2 , 319 


1971 






Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


1894 






Andover Street 


from 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 




Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 






Apollo Drive 


from 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 






Arlene Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3, 754 


1966 


1978 




Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 






Ayo tte Street 


from 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 






Baker Street 


f r om 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 


684 


1945 






Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 






Ballard vale Street 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 






Ballardvale Street 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 






Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1952 






Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 






Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 






"RpppVi ^ j-rppf 

l -> >_ 1 1 J Li. CC L 


f r om 


Riit*1 i n t" o n Avpmip t~ n RvTnn Qfrppt- 

Ulil i-J-llg n V CUUC l_ W U J L Ull J LLCCL 


1 005 


1947 






Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


'440 


1959 






Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 






R o r~\ ri \) c\?i f\ 
DcIloUU I\Uclli 


from 


IVciLlL. J_ J_ i. L I\UdU LU 1 CWR.O UU I. y LiJ-LlC 


61 6 


1 Q71 

J- y l -L 






R n cJcyjiT* A^jptimp 

-U Iggal. -TV VCLIUC 




^ a 1 £»Tn Itrppf t" n Dine A \7 n 1 1 p 


1 , 282 


1975 






Ull L UWUUU l\UuU 


from 


OIlaLiy L-i d I L t, L> L LVc 


1 , 197 


1952 






U1L L 1 1 w u u u rvueiu. 


from 


J UUl Lll [\UclU 


400 


195 3 






DUU LWcll OULtL 


f r °m 


RiiT"1"inc7t~r~*n A vpnup t~ r\ A 1 n r l p h R a rl 

DUL llllgLUll riVCllLIt: LU il-LU L 'X.U clU 


4 , 144 


1894 


1 Q6D 


1 Q7 

x y 1 . 


Brand Avenue 


i rom 


Bridge Lane 


sin 


1 Q^l 

J. y J J 


194 3 




D L ii LIU nvcIlUc 


from 


DdKL L OLLCCL LU UcyUIIU WJ_;al5fc;L OLLCCL 


q sn 

y j u 


1 Q 33 


1 QA3 
j- y h j 




DLdLLlc jLIccL 


r rom 


ooo^riiic£at~t"c? Qirpmip t~ t~\ (.aTflpn di7pmip 
ridooaLIIUbc L Lb rtvcllLlc LU udlUcIl /ivcilUc 


1 Oft 6 


1 QA S 

1 74 J 






Brentwood Avenue 


f rom 


T*T/™» V\ 1 1 >~t"» Q f- i"qq f- t~ r\ T*T*~v fi o "i H a AiiPnna 
WUDULI1 OLICCL LU nUUUalUc nvcllUc 


1 m 7 


I7J0 






Ri""i /ifto T on o 
DI lUgc LidLLc 


f rom 


QfiQT.ichppn Aupmip 
o ildw c> Lie fc: 11 nvcllUc 


ASS 
4 jj 


1 8QA 

1074 






R Y* ~I /"I O £i T *^ " ■*** 

DL lUgc J-idllc 


f r om 


LlclJ-Ll JLIccL LU UcyUIIU DItlllLl /AVCHUC: 


7SA 


1 RQA 
1074 






Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1, 377 


1954 






Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 






Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 






Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 






Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 




Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 






Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 






Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


1939 


1955 




Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


1960 


1971 




Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1961 






Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 


1,411 


1957 






Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 






Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 






Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


1963 






Central Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 






Chandler Road 


from 


Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 






Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


1971 




Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 


859 


1971 






Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 







62 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE(s) ACCEPTED 



Chestnut Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 


Church Street 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4,285 


1894 


Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


Clorinda Road 


from Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 


Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 


Columbia Street 


from 


Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1,150 


1908 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 


Congress Street 


from 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 


Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


813 


1946 


Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 


Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 


Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 


Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 


Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 


Cunningham Street 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


2,447 


1944 


Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 


Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1 , 760 


1964 


Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 


Dayton Road 


from Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 


Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1, 794 


1958 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 


Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 


Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 


Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 


Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1,560 


1959 


Drury Lane 


from 


Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 


Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1951 


Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 


Eames Street 


from 


Main Street to Woburn Street 


3,200 


1894 


Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 


450 


1947 


Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,043 


1978 


Elwood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 


Emerson Street 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


590 


1951 


Englewood Drive 


from 


Kenwood Drive 


455 


1971 


Evans Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


2 , 071 


1971 


Evprpft - Avpnnp 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 


480 


1979 


Fairfield Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,299 


1946 


Fairmeadow Road 


from 


Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


2,328 


1958 


Fairmont Avenue 


from Malloy Road 


952 


1971 


T^fl "! TV T AT*7 A VPni 1 
i. cx j_ l. v x c w n v cuuc 


from 


State Street 


648 


1933 


x aiicuii ul 1. v c 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Harvard Ave. 


790 


1950 


T^fliil kTipr Aypnnp 

i- QUIMICL rt V CllUt. 


from 


Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


1, 946 


1944 


Fay Street 


from 


Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


714 


1938 


Federal Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,740 


1894 


Ferguson Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,073 


1967 


Fletcher Lane 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 


Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 


Fordham Road 


from North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 


Forest Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,100 


1894 


Franklin Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


739 


1978 


Frederick Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


1,070 


1966 


Freeport Drive 


from 


Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


2,086 


1979 


Gandalf Way 


from 


Glen Road to Agostino Drive 


549 


1979 


Glen Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 


Glendale Circle 


from 


Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1,304 


1952 


Glenview Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 


Gowing Road 


from 


Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 



1969 



1933 



1953 1952 



1971 



1971 



1953 
1945 



1976 



63 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATES (s) ACCEPTED 



Grace Drive 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 
Gunderson Road 

Hamlin Lane 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 

Hawthorne Road 
Heather Drive 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 

Industrial Way 

Jaquith Road 
Jere Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 

Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
King Street Extension 
Kirk Street 

Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Lexington Street 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Loumac Road 
Lowell Street 
Lowell Street Park 
Lucaya Circle 

Mackey Road 
Magazine Road 
Magazine Street 



from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 

from Corey Avenue 

from Federal Street 

from Main Street to Lake Street 

from Reading Line 

from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 

from Lawrence Street 

from Woodland Road 

from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 

from Main Street to Glen Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 

from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 

from Main Street to River Street 

from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 

from Woburn Street 

from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 
from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 
from Chestnut Street to Burlignton Line 
from Suncrest Avenue 

from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 
from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 

from Woburn Street to West Street 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 
from Glen Road 

from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 
from Chandler Road 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 

from Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 

from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 

from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 

from Glen Road to Broad Street 

from Glen Road 

from Main Street 

from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

from Bancroft Street 

from Parker Street to Molloy Road 

from Lawrence Street 

from Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 
from Federal Street 
from Federal Street 

from High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 

from Main Street 

from Ballardvale Street 

from Middlesex Avenue 

from Drury Lane 

from Main Street to Reading Line 
from Lowell Street 

from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 

from Federal Street 
from Wisser Street 
from Taplin Avenue 



2,514 


1966 


815 


1952 


780 


1943 


4,147 


1910 


120 


1957 


1,506 


1959 


540 


1962 


838 


1969 


428 


1951 


600 


1895 


1,312 


1971 


806 


1945 


430 


1951 


3,270 


1951 




1971 


230 


1956 


1,286 


1979 


3,585 


1894 


2,230 


1914 


364 


1959 


1,560 


1945 


3,051 


1894 


4,430 


1974 


1,398 


1938 


1,248 


1968 


717 


1940 


400 


1953 


923 


1957 


1,420 


1945 


1,725 


1970 


693 


1958 


1,840 


1894 


2,400 


1940 


487 


1979 


575 


1951 


3,855 


1894 


409 


1952 


659 


1950 


728 


1956 


4,013 


1956 


383 


1959 


714 


1974 


740 


1943 


720 


1943 


1,760 


1950 


1,050 


1951 


977 


1957 


650 


1959 


510 


1963 


10,152 


1894 


580 


1908 


2,469 


1979 


250 


1943 


320 


1973 


190 


1973 



1966 



1953 1959 



1951 
1972 



1949 



1952 
1975 



1951 



1971 



1945 



1978 
1957 



1958 



64 



O 1 Hi J. 




T OrATTDN 


T FNHTl-l 
Li llin \j i. n 


DATE 


( g") APPFPTFn 

\oJ rtlj Lj ILL 1 Ei U 


Ma i n Q t - i~ a o t~ 

. lil 1 11 OLl-CCL 


f r om 


T q Vii l y"w T inp f~rt UnhiiT*n T inp 

J- C W I\ L' U L V L J I1C LU n UU UL 11 blllC 


21,387 


1894 




Ma t* r* i a R nan 




Mnrrh Qtrppf - f- n HpvnnH C n t - n T \7 r> PnaH 

1< U L L 11 .7 L L t; t L L L7 L1C V UUU IjdL Ulj 11 AUdU 


2 , 806 


1962 


19 71 


Marine Rnan 


from 


Gowing Road 


2 , 315 


1958 




lldl .L fc: Ul Ivc 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 


1 s? s 

Lj JLJ 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 




Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,392 


1951 




M ipoopnticcit"fc Auoniio 
rid. abaLIlUoc L Lo avcllUc 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 


810 


1945 




Mr* T^An o 1 r\ T3/^ci/H 
llL-UULldJ-U. IvUdU 


from 


Salem Street 


2 621 


1944 




M^d a ri r^T.T T inn 

ricduuw ijd.ii.fc; 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 




Mci T /~\ ri w T mp 
L it; lUUy Lidllfc: 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 




M t nn 1 qcov Auoni i fl 
Ll-LULlXtrofczA rVVcIlLlfc: 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12 , 140 


1894 




1 1 J. X fc: a J LI CC L 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




rlllier ExOdCl 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 




Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Avenue 


1,528 


1967 




Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 




IIU I LLJ.LLgaJ.U.t: U L X V fc! 


from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


69 3 


1974 




Mo r s e A v e n u e 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1 , 360 


1939 




M\7 chip AArPT"lllA 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


598 


1908 




Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 




Mi fhol c ^ t* y o o t" 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3 , 801 


1894 




niCKcL bULl rtvcllUC 


from 


West Street 


953 


1947 




M T~ {" o 1 \r A worn 10 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 




IN U L Lit J LLcc L 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3 515 


1945 




M r~i v t~ T*T ^ior\inCTf"i~»T"i A\fon 1 1 D 
LNUL LIL Vv dfc> L L -L llg L U 11 rvVCULLt: 


from 


Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 




Miinri Ro^irl 
LN LI 1 1 1 1 I\UaU 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




UdK JLLcEU 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 




Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2 , 301 


1950 




Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1 730 


1958 




Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




uison jLieeE 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 




Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to North Reading Line 


4,180 


1895 




Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2,000 


1907 


1919 


Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


DyD 


17JO 




Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


194 3 




Phillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1 , 519 


1946 


1954 


rilling Koaa 


from Hathaway Road 


Q S A 


j. " j j 




Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


JO'J 


1 QA S 

L7l J 




Pineridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


Q1 A 

?14 


1 QftD 

17UL1 




Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


a 


LyJ J 




Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


L t JU4 


1 Q'iA 




Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


7 

/ JU 


1 Qft? 
l?Di 




Powder House Circle 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


/ 1U 


1 QSA 




Presidential Drive 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 




Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 




1 Q7 A 




Radcliff Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 




Railroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 




Reading Avenue 


from 


Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 




Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 




Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 


1,090 


1971 




Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 




Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 




Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 




River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 


453 


1962 




Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1,861 


1967 




Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 




Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 





65 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



Route 62 
Royal Street 

Salem Street 
Salem Street 
Scaltrito Drive 
School Street 
Senpek Road 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Sherburn Place 
Sheridan Road 
Sherwood Road 
Silver Lake Avenue 
Sparhawk Drive 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 

Taft Road 
Taplin Avenue 
Taplin Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thrush Road 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 

Unnamed Street 
Upton Court 

Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Avenue 
Webber Street 
Wedgewood Avenue 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wicks Circle 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
Wilton Drive 
Winchell Road 
Wing Road 
Wisser Street 
Woburn Street 
Woodland Road 



from Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 
from Salem Street 

from Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale St. 
from North Reading Line to beyond Woburn St. 
from Salem Street 

from Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 
from Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 
from Hathaway Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 

from beyond Richard Street to Billerica Line 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 

from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 

from Lake Street to Dexter Street 

from Park Street to Heather Drive 

from Shady Lane Drive 

from Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 
from Lowell Street 

from West Street to Ledgewood Road 
from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 

from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 

from Wisser Street 

from Baker Street 

from Church Street 

from Salem Street to Marie Drive 

from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 

from Hathaway Road 

from Salem Street to Andover Street 
from Andover Street 

from Main Street 

from North Reading Line to North Reading Line 
from Main Street 

from Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 
from Clark Street to Stone Street 
from Burlington Avenue 
from Moore Street 

from Woburn Street to Reading Line 

from West Street 

from Everett Avenue 

from Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 

from Grove Avenue 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

from Main Street 

from Federal Street 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 

from Woburn Street 

from Main Street to Brand Avenue 

from Andover Street to Woburn Line 

from Lowell Street 



3,343 


1958 


1,043 


1951 


8,895 


1894 


6,475 


1894 


785 


1974 


1,139 


1915 


280 


1971 


300 


1955 


2,904 


1950 


11,845 


1894 


723 


1975 


1,021 


1951 


445 


1971 


455 


1954 


361 


1979 


690 


1952 


315 


1933 


908 


1955 


1,246 


1954 


2,290 


1922 


1,986 


1938 


461 


1946 


900 


1946 


214 


1911 


400 


1961 


623 


1907 


300 


1953 


470 


1958 


500 


1894 


847 


1916 


1,105 


1954 



423 
97 

1,650 
677 
476 

8,372 

1,211 
533 
239 

1,050 

5,290 
706 
760 

1,151 
193 
746 

1,146 
23,122 

1,174 



1958 
1954 
1920 
1969 
1967 
1894 
1942 
1971 
1954 
1910 
1894 
1940 
1943 
1966 
1945 
1958 
1950 
1894 
1969 



1963 



1958 



1971 



1929 



1978 



197* 



66 



Vandalism Committee 



In 1978 a Town-wide Vandalism Committee was formed through the action of Walter Pierce, Superintendent of 
Schools, the School Committee, Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen. The Committee 
was charged with the responsibility of investigating and finding possible solutions to our mutual vandalism 
problems . 

During 1979, the Vandalism Committee met monthly to study the many facets of this problem. We heard citizen 
complaints, we saw various movies with the theme of vandalism prevention and good citizenship, and we dis- 
cussed what other towns are doing to prevent vandalism. 

The Committee undertook the goal of writing a report offering our recommendations regarding vandalism preven- 
tion. In order to study the subject of vandalism in depth, we divided into four subcommittees. The subcom- 
mittees were: Police, Technical, Communication, and School. 

The actions and recommendations of each subcommittee are summarized as follows: 

- The Police Subcommittee recommended more mutual cooperation and support between the Police Department and 
the community in an effort to increase the awareness of vandalism prevention. 

- The Technical Subcommittee recommended the use of vandal-proof materials when equipping or repairing the 
schools and public buildings. Also, the upgrading of the alarm systems in the schools is recommended as 
a preventive measure. 

- The Communication Subcommittee recommended that more communication is needed between and among all segments 
of the community in order to make people aware of vandalism prevention. The community should be made aware 
of the positive aspects of the Town in order to encourage and foster community pride. 

- The School Subcommittee recommended the use of a program entitled, "Project Pride" in order to develop a 
positive approach to responsible citizenship in the elementary grades. 

The final report was delivered to the Board of Selectmen on October 9, 1979. It contained additional recom- 
mendations and analysis. Some of them require the expenditure of public funds while the others require a 
change in attitude. This report will assist the Board of Selectmen in looking at the many ways to solve the 
vandalism problem in the town of Wilmington. 




Repairing Damage Caused by Vandalism 



67 



School Committee 



The School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1979. The present 
membership of the committee is as follows: 

Lester E. White, Chairperson 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr. , Vice Chairperson 

Linda T. McMenimen, Secretary 

John D. Brooks 

James A. Demos 

James D. Tighe 

Wilmington opened its school classes this year on September 5, 1979, with a total enrollment of A, 344 students. 
This figure is down 270 from last year's official enrollment of 4,614. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Administration and Staff at Wilmington High School have been working hard on our next ten-year evaluation 
study by a visiting team from the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This is scheduled 
to take place during the 1980-1981 school year. At this writing, several regular curriculum committees have 
been conducting a required self-evaluation in advance of the visiting team. Over the past ten years Wilmington 
High School received short term accreditation due to several notable deficiencies in the current school plant. 
A major two-phase renovation/conversion carried out during 1976-1978 by the School Committee has helped to ease 
the crowded conditions in some departments. This, combined with a general overall systemwide decline in en- 
rollment should make the prospects for continued accreditation more reasonable. Our current accreditation has 
been continued through June, 1980. 

STAFF RECRUITMENT 

As in the five previous years, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the limited 
number of positions available. The school administration received hundreds of inquiries and applications from 
certified teaching personnel. A significant number of these inquiries were received from out of state 
universities . 

ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 

There are many outstanding students at Wilmington High School who are recognized for their achievements in a 
variety of ways, including election to the National Honor Society, Honor Roll, receiving personal letters, and 
being selected as Junior Rotarians. This year 56 students were inducted into the National Honor Society dur- 
ing a candle-lighted ceremony. The Honor Roll had 120 students who were on it all year. In addition, 49 
students who were on the Honor Roll for two years received a Wilmington High School "W" with an embroidered 
scholastic lamp, similar to athletic letters. Over 50 personal letters were sent to students whose conduct 
significantly improved since last year. 

FACILITIES 

The Wilmington School Committee established a Task Force to examine the quantity and quality of facilities 
available for educational programs at the High School and will report its recommendation to the School Com- 
mittee by January 1, 1981. The Task Force will have broad representation by including parents, teachers, 
students, school committee members and administrators. 

One step taken towards alleviating the space problem was making the Swain Elementary School an annex of the 
High School. Although this created eight classrooms, pressing needs immediately took four of the rooms. A 
classroom for autistic students and another room for severely intellectually handicapped students of high school 
age use two of the rooms. Our expanded Reading Center and Physical Education programs use two additional rooms. 
The remaining rooms are used by a variety of departments. 



68 



DISCIPLINE 



Attendance continues to be the major discipline concern of the High School, although close to 95% school 
attendance is maintained. Our Alternative Suspension Program, which is essentially a family counseling pro- 
gram, utilizing SHARE, Inc., provides students and their parents with an opportunity to discuss home problems 
that might be contributing to school problems. 

A group called the "Kitchen Cabinet" consisting of the President and Vice-President of each class meet regularly 
with the High School Principal to discuss mutual concerns including vandalism, the use of the Public Library 
and the Common. 

GIFTED AND TALENTED PROGRAMS 

The School Committee, on the recommendation of the School Administration, voted to continue its commitment to 
the gifted and talented program by establishing two full-time teaching positions as an adaptation and exten- 
sion of Project Enterprise. The Enterprise program, dubbed Project Enterprise II, has been expanded to grade 
seven students who are qualified. The main thrust of the effort is the continued development of cooperative 
individual learning contracts for participating students. A regional support project funded through the 
Merrimack Education Center is also being conducted on the establishment of appropriate mentorship training at 
the junior high level. 

At this writing, approximately 100 students are participating under the direction of the two Enterprise 
teachers . 

ROTARY CLUB 

The School Committee would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of the Wilmington Public Schools, to thank 
the Wilmington Rotary Club once again for its splendid donation of a Universal Gym Machine to the school de- 
partment. This machine, which cost in excess of $5,000, has enabled the school department to offer an im- 
proved and more diversified curriculum in physical education. The school department has provided physical 
education instructors to conduct workshops and classes utilizing the machine for total community involvement. 
Physical education classes, intramurals, athletic teams, the maintenance department, police department, fire 
department, and recreation department have all benefited from the Universal fitness program. 

M.O.I.S. 

This year the Career and Occupational Education department obtained money for four federally funded programs 
under Public Law 92-482 amounting to over $26,000. One of these grants allowed us to purchase M.O.I.S. The 
Massachusetts Occupational Information System (M.O.I.S.) provides us with continually updated materials on 
occupations, training programs (from technical schools through graduate programs) and financial aid programs. 
It used as the basis an interactive computer program which begins with students' responses to a questionnaire 
to narrow the career search. Once a career has been identified, a description of the career, the outlook and 
then need as well as source of training programs are printed for the student. The student may explore other 
related careers or get information on training programs for the careers. The material is presented in a non- 
sterotyped format through a system which requires student participation and provides the students with their 
personal copy of the material. 

The system lists educational institutions in New England as well as the rest of the nation, plus more than 200 
specialized business, nursing and trade schools. M.O.I.S. informs students of various ways to utilize in- 
formation on financial aid from nearly 500 sources in the state, with conditions of grants, amounts, deadlines 
and people to contact. 

This program' is designed so that students will have the opportunity to explore the careers they are interested 
in, so that they can make decisions now that will affect them later on in life. 

CAREER AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION RESOURCE ROOM 

The Career and Occupational Education Department is still broadening and expanding the Speakers' and Shadowing 
programs. We have been able to obtain the services of many guest speakers to come in and speak to our students 
in the classroom and to tell them about their occupations. We have been able to place some students in shadow- 
ing programs, so that the students can actually feel the working experience. 

Additionally, this department has found and placed eighty-five students in jobs since September. These positions 



69 



positions included some of the following areas: office work, secretary, assembly work, kitchen help, waitres 
salesperson, lab aide, baggers, gas station attendants, dental lab aide, cashiers, yard work, odd jobs, load- 
ing, baby sitting, washing floors, and cleaning offices. 

The Career Resource Center has been helping students to acquire information about the careers in which they 
are interested. This office also has been giving guidance to classes of students, making them aware of all 
the opportunities that are available. 

RESIGNATIONS AND RETIREMENTS 

Requests for leaves of absence, resignations, and retirements were granted to thirty-five (35) teachers for t 
following reasons: 

Leaves of Absence : 5 Resignations : 30 



Personal 


1 


Personal 


1 


Sabbatical Leave 





Retirement 





Maternity Leave 


2 


Teach in Other Communities 


10 


Graduate Study 


1 


Continue Education 


1 


Temporary Relocation 





Family Responsibility 


4 


Family Responsibilities 


1 


Career Change 


1 






Reduction in Force 


7 






Counseled Out 


3 






Teachers on Leave 


3 



(Who Resigned) 

The Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 6, 1978, and ending June 22, 197< 
The Committee held twenty-three (23) regular meetings, four (4) special meetings, twelve (12) meetings relativ 
to collective bargaining, and one (1) public budget meeting for a total of forty (40) meetings for the year 
1979. 

The Committee is grateful to the other Town Officials, other Town Departments, and to the citizens of Wilmingt 
for their excellent cooperation and assistance during the past year. 




Preparing Crosswalks for the New School Year 

70 



Superintendent of Schools 



A review of the year's activities brings out the following highlights: 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Guidance Counseling 

Helping students help themselves continues to be the primary role of the guidance counselors. This is being 
done even more actively this year. One example of this is our Group Guidance program which was developed in 
conjunction with SHARE, Inc. and noted by the State Department of Education as an exemplary program. The 
program provides students with an opportunity to meet with their guidance counselor at least 15 times in their 
Freshman year at the school. 

College Night and Financial Aid nights are two more programs that actively seek to provide parents and students 
with information. Combined, these programs attracted an audience of over 275 people. The fact that more 
students in the Class of '79 are going to private, rather than public, four year colleges could be because 
parents and students are learning about the opportunities and funds that are available. 

Helping parents is important, too. With the assistance of SHARE, an evening program for parents was arranged 
and held at the school. 

To help the Guidance Counselors be more effective, Mystic Valley Mental Health Clinic continues to provide a 
clinical psychologist for an in-service training program. Among the issues being discussed are children of 
divorce and crisis intervention. 

The High School Principal coordinates these diverse Guidance Department functions with the assistance of the 
Dean of Students. 

Foreign Language 

Over 60% of the student body study a foreign language at Wilmington High School. The languages offered are 
French, Spanish, Italian, Latin and German. These courses are taught in the High School Annex, formerly called 
the Swain Elementary School. Built in 1914, it was, however, the town's only high school until the present 
high school was constructed in 1954. In September 1979, the Swain School became a high school once again. 

Re-Introduction of Latin 

In September 1979, Latin was reintroduced at Wilmington High School. More than sixty students signed up for 
this course. They are now involved in learning the structure of the language and English derivatives. 

Latin II will be offered next year so that students can continue their progress in the language. 

Spanish Students Go To Spain 

In the Spring of 1979, eleven fourth and fifth year Spanish students under the direction of Miss Beth Swenson, 
raised money to pay their own expenses to travel to Spain. Their base of operations was Madrid, but thev took 
almost daily "side trips" into the Spanish countryside. Students returned, full of enthusiasm and delighted 
that they had been able to use their language skills. 

Advanced French and Spanish Students at Boston College 

In October 1979, almost one hundred top foreign language students spent a day at Boston College where they 
attended a "Career Day on Foreign Languages". They were given many ideas on how they can combine their 



71 



foreign language skills with a career. Many students were so impressed with Boston College that they decided i 
to apply there. 

MATHEMATICS 

A new elementary mathematics series has been adopted systemwide. The new program, Heath Mathematics , is 
adaptable to a wide spectrum of ability levels and should provide much continuity to our elementary curriculuii 
The content of the program shows an emphasis on computational skills and problem solving, demonstrating a 
departure from the "modern math" techniques of years past. 

THE SPELLING PROGRAM 

In September 1976 a committee of elementary teachers and the Director of English completed a guide for spellirj 
instruction in grades K through 6. In 1976-77 and 1977-78, a pre- and post-test evaluation of spelling achie\| 
ment in grades 4-5-6 was completed using the Morrison-McCall Spelling Scale. All of the classes achieved at 
or above grade level on the post-test. In 1978-79, the pre- and post-test evaluation used a random selection | 
of words from the graded word list. All the gains in achievement were statistically significant. The follow- 
ing percentages were achieved: 

Pre-Test Post Test 



Grade 3: 72% 91% 

Grade 4: 76% 83% 

Grade 5: 75% 84% 

Grade 6: 64% 82% 



MORE STUDENT WRITING 

More students are electing courses in writing in their junior and senior years. The writing courses include 
Writing Workshop, Developmental Writing, Basic Composition, Grammar and Usage (three levels), Journalism, Logi 
and Semantics, and Language Study. In 1978-79, 89% of the students enrolled in one of the above course; in I 
1979-80, 102% of the students have enrolled. The latter figure indicates that at least 96 more students took 
the above courses in 1979-1980. 

READING 

Enrollments in the High School Reading Center are up. Course offerings have expanded to meet student demands: 

A. Reading Skills For Freshmen is now offered 5 days a week for 1 semester for 2 1/2 credits. It is 
designed to help ninth graders develop the reading/study skills needed to do well in their high 
school subjects. 

B. PSAT , SAT and College Board Preparation is offered either as a semester course, twice a week, for 
one credit or on a short-term basis for no credit. It is open to all students who want help in 
preparing for these exams. 

C. Reading Field Service , an independent study in which high school students are trained to tutor 
elementary school children in reading, has been a springboard for launching students into teaching 
careers. Several high school tutors who are now in the program or who have previously participated 
in the program have decided to enter the teaching profession as a result of their experiences in 

the course. Currently high school students are tutoring children in the following elementary schoolsl 

Boutwell Wildwood 
Shawsheen Woburn Street 

This is offered as a year course for ten credits. 

D. Other courses that are regularly offered by the high school reading department are Spee d Reading , 
Study Skills , and Reading Skills Ele ctive Grades 11-12, which is offered for English credit. 



The Reading Department offers courses for parents and teachers: 

A. Mini - Course for Parents - As a result of popular demand, mini-courses in reading are offered for 
parents. Parents discuss practical means for enhancing their children's desire to read as well 
as their ability to read. 



72 



B. Reading In the Content Areas , a three-credit, in-service course was offered to teachers in Grades 
7-12. Teachers from the following areas took this course in order to integrate the teaching of 
reading into everyday classroom instruction: English, Foreign Language, Math, Science, Social 
Studies, Reading, and Library. 

In addition, the Volunteer .Reading Tutor Program was expanded. This program expanded its training program 
which originally placed parents only in Grades 1-3 is a 20-hour program which includes classroom observation 
as part of the instruction. 

AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES 

During the past year, the Director of Audio Visual Services was charged with the responsibility of supervising 
the successful completion of the microfilming of all school records on hand at the Roman House. The project 
was completed ahead of the target date leaving enough time remaining to microfilm some records designated by 
the high school principal. We were able to successfully microfilm between 162,000 and 178,000 school depart- 
ment documents prior to September 1979. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the 1978-1979 school year 143 students were referred for initial TEAM evaluation as provided for in 
Chapter 766. The following graph indicates, by grade level, the number of referrals received. 

REFERRAL PATTERN FOR SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS 
1978-1979 School Year 




GRADE 



K 



10 11 12 Parents and/or 
Outside Agencies 



Total Number of Referrals - 143 



73 



An ongoing goal of Chapter 766 is the mainstreaming of special needs students into regular education programs. 
The Special Education Department is continuing to work cooperatively with all schools and departments in an 
effort to achieve this goal. The following two graphs provide data with regard to (a) movement among program 
classifications, and (b) increases and decreases of special education service hours for special needs students 
during the 1978-1979 school year. 



MOVEMENT AMONG PROTOTYPES 
1978-1979 School Year 



280 



CO 

I 240 
I 200 

Cm 



co 160 

1 



o 
U 

■§ 



120 



80 



40 



274 



35 

I 



22 



20 



Total Number of Reviews 
Number of Reviews Reduced by Prototype 



* * Number of Reviews Increased by Prototype 
^ Number of Reviews Found Not Special Needs 




74 



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75 



The Special Education Department continued to take advantage of the federal government's special education 
law, P.O. 94-142, by obtaining federal grant monies in an ongoing effort to upgrade and supplement the level 
of services to special needs students. Our 1979-1980 grant totals $100,450. With this money, the School 
Department has hired 2 additional speech pathologists, a part-time communication assistant, 2 learning dis- 
abilities teachers (1 for the high school and 1 for the elementary level), as well as additional contracted 
services of a licensed consulting psychologist and a school psychologist. With this additional staff, the 
Special Education Department has been able to reduce caseloads and is further able to provide more intensive 
ancillary services to special needs students. 

Wilmington's entitlement under P.L. 94-142 should increase for the 1980-1981 school year. Estimated entitle-' 
ments total approximately $115,000, and the Special Education Department has already written a federal grant 
proposal in an effort to obtain these monies. 

During this past school year a systemwide special needs parent advisory council has been formed and is workin 
closely with the special education director and staff. 

STATUS OF THE CLASS OF 1979 



To four year non-state colleges and universities 


58 


( 


21 


9%) 


To four year state colleges and universities 


44 


( 


16 


6%) 


To two year non-state colleges 


10 


( 


3 


8%) 


To two year state colleges 


19 


( 


7 


2%) 


To other post high school education 


6 


( 


2 


3%) 


Total to further education 


137 


( 


51 


8%) 


To working forces 


112 


( 


42 


5%) 


To military service 


8 


( 


3 


0%) 


To marriage 


2 


( 





8%) 


To marriage and work 


5 


( 


1 


9%) 


Did not respond to survey 





( 





0%) 


TOTAL 


264 


(100 


0%) 



In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to extend my appreciation to the School Committee, ad- 
ministrators, teachers, parents and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools 
during the 1979 school year. A special note of thanks also is extended to Dr. Derek R. Little for filling in 
for me during my recent absence and also to the many town departments that cooperated with the school system 
during 1979. 




Class of 1979 Graduation 



76 



Elected representatives of the School Committee are: 



BEDFORD 



BURLINGTON 



Anthony Mazzone 

Joseph Rogers, Vice Chairman 



John G. Murphy 
John P. Miller 



BILLERICA 



TEWKSBURY 



Kenneth L. Buffum, Secretary-Treasurer 
Paul Heffernan 



Richard E. Griffin, Chairman 
Wilson E. Brazile 



WILMINGTON 



Lawrence Flaherty 
Frank McLean 



To Residents of Billerica, Bedford, Burlington, Tewksbury and Wilmington: 

It has been my pleasure to serve as Chairman of the Shawsheen Valley Regional School Committee again in 1979. 
During this period of time, there have been many issues facing this committee. The committee through me would 
like to relate these to you, the residents and taxpayers of the five town district. 

With the Phase II expansion, the total enrollment in the day program has achieved its full potential. In 1979, 
the committee was able to reduce tax assessments to the five towns due to the fact that we held to "no new 
positions", and balanced the 7 1/2% increase in the teachers' contract. With the loss of the initial bond 
payment on Phase I construction, an increase in state aid to this vocational school was put to budget reduction 

Our original budget did not exceed the tax cap. However, during this fiscal year some emergency situations of 
a financial nature required attention. These specifically were the extensive roof repairs required on the 
original Phase I portion of the building, the retubing of the boilers, and the inability of the bus contractor 
to complete his five year contract. 

The necessary roof repairs to protect the contents of the building was bid. Since no monies were provided for 
this emergency within the 1979-80 budget, the committee decided to utilize a portion of approximately $409,000 
in additional unanticipated receipts from state reimbursements. This was done to avoid five special town meet- 
ings which would be costly. It was also done publicly with notification of each town through its selectmen, 
school committee and finance committee. The energy saving repairs to the boilers was also bid and awarded for 
approximately $15,000. Finally, Fiore Bus Service declared in August 1979, its inability to fulfill the cost 
per bus originally bid on a five year basis. After an agreement for a temporary increase through December 31, 
1979 to Fiore Bus Service, the committee opted to rebid all bus transportation. Dissatisfied with the initial 
bids as presented, the majority of the committee voted to rebid the transportation on only a two and one-half 
year basis with some discount procedures in the specifications. Based upon these discount procedures, the 
SVT Bus Service, Inc. was voted to take over the busing on January 2, 1980. A temporary restraining order 
granted to Fiore Bus Service by the court led to a delay in signing this contract and some additional legal 
costs for the regional school committee. The additional increased cost of $172,000 for transportation was not 
figured in our 1979-80 fiscal budget and, therefore, also had to be taken from the previously announced surplus 
With these emergency expenditures, the school committee has exceeded the 4% cap. Our original budget was with- 
in the tax cap prior to these emergencies. 

As the committee currently works on its budget for the 1980-81 fiscal year, it has become more difficult to 
anticipate and control expenditures within a possible proposed tax cap. 

Rising inflationary costs in all areas, particularly as it relates to energy, defeat most attempts to control 
costs. Collective bargaining with five contracts reopening during the next fiscal year poses a dilemma for the 
committee. We must be fair and reasonable to our employees and also very sensitive to the increased salary 



77 



costs. The increased busing and fuel costs for transportation will also inflate our budgets over the next 
years. State aid now in the save harmless status should remain stable over this period. Decreased bonding 
costs for school construction loans will not be felt again for another year. In early January 1980, the sc; 
vent financial picture of the past year does not appear on the horizon in the very near future. This forec 
does concern the committee and efforts in cutting expenditures and saving money have been made. However, w. 
as a committee, have the major responsibility of the sound educational programs of this facility. This cosj 
money. We look for the continued support of citizens and taxpayers in this pursuit of excellent vocational 
skill training and we are grateful for your past contributions to the excellent growth of this school. Re- 
sponsible, trained and skilled additions to this area's work force — the recent graduates of this school — ar 
also grateful for this start on a career given by you, the residents of the five town district. Thank you 
to all of you. 

In addition, as Chairman, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the continuing interest and work of al 
committee members in achieving progress. These efforts should lead the school well into the 80' s. 

I am pleased with the confidence and support of the committee during some trying issues. Committee members 
do not always agree, but with forbearance and patience toward one another, friendships and respect have gro 




Shawsheen Tech Students 




7 8 



1979 was a busy year for all individuals associated with Shawsheen Tech. We have been interested in energy 
conservation, new developments in industry, and innovative programs. Although some of the towns in the region 
have been concerned with dropping enrollment, in September approximately 865 students applied for 400 places 
available. A significant factor in the make up of our student population indicates parents and students are 
concerned with the high cost of a college education. Students interested in going into a field of engineering 
look to Shawsheen to develop their skills, to provide a means of income to pay for part of their college 
education . 

The constant concern with energy conservation has resulted in a number of measures being taken to cut down on 
the use of fuel and lights. In the latter part of this year we repaired a large part of our roof with a 
special application of insulation and waterproof material which we expect will reflect considerable savings in 
fuel. We are constantly on the alert to make sure that lights and equipment are turned off when not in use. 

Participation in the cafeteria lunch program is 99%. We understand this is the highest record in the state. 

In keeping up with new developments in industry, members of the staff attended the annual convention of the 
American Vocational Association. They met with representatives of other schools and saw some of the newest 
developments in the field of vocational education. Staff members and I visited the following vocational 
schools: Tri County, Franklin; Minuteman, Lexington; and North Shore, Beverly. Some ideas seen on visiting 
these schools have been incorporated in our building. 

Graduation /Placement 

On June 10, the Class of 1979 graduated 353 seniors with placement as follows: 



Employed in field 262 

Further education 46 

Armed Services 10 

Employed in other fields 14 

Process of securing employment 5 

Not placed/special circumstances 16 



Graduates were placed in a total of 123 companies including; Souza's Auto Body, Dracut; Fred F. Cain, Wilming- 
ton; Sweetheart Plastics, Wilmington; Digital, Tewksbury; BASF, Bedford; Medford Woodworkers Co., Medford; 
Howell & Sons Builders, Wilmington; Microwave Associates, Burlington; Touch of Class, Billerica; Sheraton, 
Lexington; Branding Iron, Tewksbury; Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford; MIT Lincoln Labs, Lexington; Glenview 
Engine & Iron Works, Dracut; Compugraphic, Wilmington; Interstate Electric, Burlington; Geartronics, Billerica; 
BTU Engineering, Billerica; RCA, Burlington; Computervision, Burlington; W.E. Andrews, Co., Bedford; Choate 
Hospital, Woburn; Design & Process Engineering, Billerica; High Voltage, Burlington. 

In accordance with state regulations the placement office continues a one year and five year follow-up studv 
of graduates. We now have information on students who graduated in 1974 and 1978. A sample of the information 
received for 1974 graduates include draftsman $215 week, carpentry foreman $11.75 hour; electronic technician 
$20,000 year, machine shop owner $400 week; electronic draftsman $4.75 hour; autobody foreman $200 week; 
commercial artist $6.50 hour. Positions held by the graduates of 1978 include diesel burner mechanic $5.25 
hour; detail drafter $8 hour; carpenter $5 hour; assistant lab supervisor $6.50 hour; machinist $8 hour; 
systems technician $5.95 hour. 

Members of the School Committee and I attended various town meetings to give residents an opportunity to hear 



79 



about Shawsheen and ask questions. 
Admissions 

The number of applicants applying to Shawsheen continues to be in excess of 800 students. This figure had 
held for the past five years since the opening of the Phase II addition. Due to continued, strong demand for 
vocational education within the district, programs are constantly developed in the cooperating school systems 
to provide vocational education for students who are unable to have this need met in the full time or after- 
noon program at Shawsheen. 

Enrollment figures as of October 1, 1979, were as follows: 



TOWN 


9th 


10th 


11th 


12 th 


TOTAL 


Bedford 


38 


29 


22 


21 


110 


Billerica 


130 


131 


145 


123 


529 


Burlington 


64 


54 


58 


57 


233 


Tewksbury 


96 


105 


104 


94 


399 


Wilmington 


71 


73 


72 


64 


280 


Totals 


399 


392 


401 


359 


1551 



Basic Skills 

Planning for the Basic Skills program scheduled to go into effect throughout the state in the 1980-81 school 
year is under way. Plans must be approved between February and August of 1980. Shawsheen will be prepared 
to insure that all graduates of the school have reached a minimal level of competence. This will be done 
through a testing program and a method of remediation for those who need assistance in reaching this goal. 

Special Needs 

The special needs program in accordance with Chapter 766, serves 205 students. Teachers, specially skilled 
in this area supervise the mainstreaming of students into the curriculum as much as possible. With the assist 
ance of federal funds, two programs were developed which include building maintenance and vocational aides. 
The purpose is to provide students with mild and moderate special needs appropriate vocational training. 

Curriculum 



New advances in curriculum and equipment included setting up a special section in the library for material in 
accordance with Chapter 622, designed to give women equal rights. The curriculum was modified to broaden the 
base in commercial art to include photography as a unit. New equipment included ten new word processors in 
Business Technology, giving us a total of fifteen stations making this particular area the most advanced in 
the state. 



Student Activities 



The annual Blood Donor program and Art Festival were held. Productive work included masonry work for the 
Billerica Department of Public Works and Billerica High School. Masonry, carpentry, metal fabrication and 
maintenance mechanics combined to build a new refreshment stand near our football field. In accordance with 
practice each year, students completed a house in Wilmington. The senior review and talent show was presented 
at the Marshall Middle School, Billerica. Automotive students placed ill in the state in the Plymouth Trouble 
Shooting Contest. Awards were won at the Burlington Mall annual vocational show and Scholastic Art Contest. 
Sports awards included the Varsity Hockey Team winning the Commonwealth Championship with advancement to the 
state Division II semi-finals. The Girls Softball Team won the Commonwealth League position with a 17-2 
record. 



Summer Program 



The summer school program was held again this year for a six week period during July and August, in line with 



80 



the objective of maximum utilization of our facility. Five towns combined to have make-up courses taken here 
at Shawsheen, while other students had an opportunity to develop skills in various vocational areas. 965 
students attended the program. 

Area Coordinator 

The responsibility of the Area Coordinator is to develop and supervise skill training programs in the schools 
of the five towns that would complement those being offered at Shawsheen Tech. Included is Project SCORE, a 
vocational skill program for special needs students being trained in the industrial arts shops of the five 
towns. Secondly, the Electronics Assembly program develops skills in the electronic field whereby industrial 
art teachers are working with seniors in their own school in order to develop a saleable skill. John McDermott, 
the coordinator, reports that we now have over one hundred students placed in jobs in local industry as a 
result of these programs. During the spring, over 150 fifth and sixth grade students spend two days at 
Shawsheen Tech becoming familiar with specific shops of their choice. Project Update involves members of 
industrial companies in our area, from RCA, GE, Altron, visiting schools to improve preparation of our students 
for the world of work. 

Advisory Committees 

Craft Advisory Committee meetings were held in the spring and fall. These meetings were well attended by 
members of industry who met with shop teachers to discuss the present curriculum and how it could be updated 
to coincide with requirements of industry. On October 22, our administrative staff held an Advisory Committee 
meeting with the Superintendents of the five towns to discuss Shawsheen 1 s operation and how we could work to- 
gether to provide the skill training in which the students are interested. 

Adult Education 

Evening school continues to be a very popular operation with approximately fifty-two courses serving 3,000 
adults each year. Programs operate weekly, Monday through Thursday, from 7-10 p.m. Courses are held for 
two semesters; from October to January and January to April. The primary purpose is to assist adults working 
in specific areas to better advancement, and other individuals who are interested in acquiring a new skill. 
Two programs are of special interest. The high school equivalency program offers adults an opportunity to 
study for the state equivalency exam. This is geared for individuals, who for various reasons, did not have 
an opportunity to get a high school diploma. The second program, Project Explore, is for individuals who do 
not have a job or are interested in finding where their ability lies. After a series of tests, adults are 
scheduled to four different shop areas to determine which area they would be suited, and acquire sufficient 
skill to get a job in that particular field. 

Summary 

The increasing need for properly trained graduates in both industry and business reflects the importance of 
the operation here at Shawsheen Tech. We continue to do everything possible to meet these needs not only by 
the programs at Shawsheen Tech, but also working together with the teachers of the five towns to assist 
students who are interested in acquiring a skill. 





Shawsheen Tech On-site Construction Project 

81 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING AND ELECTION - MARCH 3, 1979 and MARCH 10, 1979 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the Third of March, A.D. 1979 at 9:45 
o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the 
election of the Town offices: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: One 
Selectman for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the School 
Committee for the term of three years; One member of the School Committee for two years (unexpired term); 
One member of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of five years; One member of the Regional Vocational 
Technical School Committee for the term of three years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday the tenth 
day of March A.D. , 1979 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan, 
at 9:45 a.m., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber, it 
was seconded and it was voted to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and Voter Identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 

The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by the Town Clerk, Priscilla R. Ward. 

At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the printer packs were removed from the back of the voting 
machines and one copy was given to the tally clerks, one was posted outside the railing so that each candidate 
could add up his own totals at once. There were (23) twenty-three absentee ballots cast which were added to 
the machine totals. 

The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 9:00 p.m. 

All the totals from the twenty- five voting machines plus the absentee ballots were for the following: 



SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for one ) 

Elected Robert J. Cain, 39 Arlene Avenue 1162 

Daniel Wandell, 91 Shawsheen Avenue 1086 

Blanks 12 

2260 

MODERATOR - One year (Vote for one) 

Elected John M. Callan, 571 Woburn Street 1635 

Blanks 625 



2260 

82 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Elected 



Philip A. 
Blanks 



Two years (unexpired term) (Vote for one ) 



Fenton, Sr., 69 Butters Row 



SCHOOL C OMMITTEE 
Sleeted 
Elected 



Three years (Vote for not more than two ) 



James A. Demos, 40 Hopkins Street 
Linda T. McMenimen, 14 Grace Drive 
Arthur W. Ryder, 17 Main Street 
Blanks 



WILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 



Elected 



Five years (Vote for one ) 



Carl A. Backman, Jr. , 2 Faulkner Avenue 
Blanks 



REGIONAL VOCATIONAL /TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for one ) 
Elected Frank H. McLean, 5 Temple Street 

Sidney R. Kaizer, 5 Cottage Street 

Blanks 



1491 

769 
2260 



1216 
1382 
750 
1172 
4520 



1678 
582 
2260 



1292 
656 
312 

2260 



All elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the 
Town Clerk. Mr. John Callan was sworn in on the following Tuesday at the Town Hall. 

There were Two thousand two hundred and sixty (2260) votes cast. 



Attest 



Priscilla R. Ward 
Town Clerk, Wilmington 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 10, 1979 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The Moderator, John M. Callan, asked for a count of all present. The checkers informed him that only fifty- 
one (51) were in attendance. Mr. Callan asked Mrs. Joyce Brisbois to explain why the Finance Committee had 
not made their recommendations. She read the letter to the taxpayers that the Finance Committee had pre- 
pared on February 23, 1979. The letter is as follows: 

"The Finance Committee has held numerous meetings on the fiscal '80 Town Budget as well as the capital outlay 
portion of the budget. We have also held the required public hearing on all of the articles in the warrant. 

The Governor, as you know, has introduced House Bill #5603 into the legislative process. This bill, if 
enacted, would provide local spending caps and any action taken by the Finance Committee would have no effect 
on the Town Budget if this bill becomes law. 

In light of the above pending legislation, the Finance Committee is unable to provide the taxpayers its 
recommendations on the warrant articles and, therefore, in compliance with Chapter 4, Section 4 and 5 of the 
revised By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, we wish to notify the Town that no report will be made until such 
time as there is a resolution to the tax and spending limitation plan being proposed by the Governor, Edward 
J. King, or similar legislation approved or adopted by the General Court." 

s/ Joyce Brisbois, Chairman 
Wilmington Finance Committee 

After reading the above, Joyce Brisbois recommended that a motion be made to adjourn the Town Meeting until 
May 5, 1979. Mr. Belbin questioned the late date and was answered by Aldo Caira about legislation procedures 
and time involved. After which Mr. Caira read the motion, "Because of lack of a quorum, I move that the Town 
vote to adjourn this meeting to May 5, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium." The motion was 
seconded and so voted by all present. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:42 p.m. with a final count of fifty-nine (59) people present. 



S3 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 



Notice is hereby given that the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, pursuant to authority granted 
by Chapter 22 of the Acts of 1979, have voted to continue the adjourned Annual Town Meeting, previously 
adjourned to May 5, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium, to May 19, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. to be held 
at the High School Gymnasium for the purpose of transacting business of the Annual Town Meeting pursuant to 
the warrant dated February 16, 1979. 



Attest : 



si Aldo A. Caira, Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 



The above was advertised in the Town Crier, April 11, 1979. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING ADJOURNED AND CONTINUED 
TO THE VOTERS OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS: 

The Annual Town Meeting adjourned to May 5, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. in the High School Gymnasium for the purpose 
of transacting business of the warrant posted February 16, 1979 will be continued to May 19, 1979 at 1:30 p.r 
in the High School Gymnasium. In accordance with Chapter 22, Acts of 1979. 



Attest : 



si Priscilla R. Ward 

Town Clerk, Wilmington 



On May 5, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. Moderator, John M. Callan; Selectmen, Rocco V. DePasquale and A. John Imbimbo; 
Town Counsel, Alan Altman; Finance Committeeman, Walter Kaminski; Checkers, Doro thy Peters and Kathleen 
Scanl on; Police Officer Arthur V. Lynch and the Town Clerk met at the High School Gymnasium to continue the 
Adjourned Town Meeting of March 10, 1979. This meeting and its continuance was properly posted by Constable 
Lynch on April 11, 1979. No others being present the Town Clerk made the motion to continue the meeting 
until May 19, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium, the motion was seconded. The meeting was 
adjourned at 1:35 p.m. 



Attest : 



Priscilla R. Ward 
Town Clerk, Wilmington 



ADJOURNED AND CONTINUED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



MAY 19, 1979 



On May 19, 1979 at 1:30 p.m. the High School Gymnasium was opened for the third time, for the purpose of 
holding the Annual Town Meeting, all past gatherings were posted in accordance with the General Laws. 

With a quorum present the Moderator asked for the voters to take their seats for the action of the Town 
Meeting business. 



The Girl Scouts led the people in a Flag Ceremony and pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. 
Clergy, the Moderator lead the voters in prayer before opening the meeting at 1:45 p.m. 



In the absence of 



With quorum present the Moderator explained to those in attendance about the two meetings scheduled for the 
same day and time. He asked that the Special Town Meeting be opened and that he would entertain a motion to 
adjourn until after the budget in the Annual Town Meeting. 

Mr. Callan began reading the Warrant of the Special Town Meeting and was interrupted by Aldo Caira that he 
dispense with further reading of same. The motion was seconded and so voted. Mr. Caira then moved that we 
adjourn the Special Town Meeting until after Article 6. Mr. J. Tsicoulias moved that we adjourn until after 
Article 17 of the Annual Town Meeting. Mr. Doyle moved that we adjourn until 7:30 p.m. They were voted in 
order of latest time. Mr. Tsicoulias' motion came first and was so voted. 

The Moderator then adjourned the Special Town Meeting to be called to order after Article 17 of the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Mr. Callan commenced the reading of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting at 2:00 p.m. Mr. Caira of the 
Board of Selectmen moved that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take up and 

84 



make reference to each article by number. Seconded and so voted. 



ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Mr. Morris, "I move that we pass over Article 2." 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying 
unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. Mr. Morris, "I move that we pass over 
this article. "Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1979 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes there- 
for, payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor payable within one year, and to renew any note 
or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 17, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion by Mr. 
Morris, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1979 in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4 and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17." Motion seconded and voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries of 
several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or otherwise - , or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Joyce Brisbois, Chairman of the Finance Committee, "I move that the several and respective sums as 
recommended by the Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appro- 
priated for the purpose set forth in Article five subject to amendment." Motion so voted. 

ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION OR TRANSFER : 

Before the voting started the Moderator, Mr. John Callan spoke to the voters about the Governor 's Tax Cap 
and asked for a unanimous or 2/3rds vote on each line as voted. Each line was so voted unless otherwise 
noted . 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries $ 2,500.00 

Expenses 6,250.00 

8,750.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 14,000.00 

Expenses 9,200.00 

(This line item was moved to be cut to $8,000.00 . Motion lost.) 23,200.00 

Registrar of Voters 

Salaries 2,000.00 

Expenses 8,200.00 

10, 200.00 

Finance Committee 

Salary 700.00 

Expenses 4 , 240 . 00 

4,940.00 

Town Manager 

Salary-Town Manager 34,338.00 

(This line item was moved to be cut back to $25,000.00 . Motion lost. Original 
Motion so voted with majority vote.) 

Other Salaries 33,271.00 

(This line item was moved to be cut back to $15,715.19. Motion lost and was re- 
considered and Motion lost again.) 

Expenses l t 150.00 

$ 68,759.00 



Town Accountant 

Salaries - Town Account $ 21,877.00 

Other Salaries 13,567.0(8 

Capitol Outlay ■ 

Expenses 750.00 

36,194.00 

Treasurer 

Salary - Treasurer 15,947.00 

Other Salaries -a 13,105.00 

Expenses 1,550.00 

Tax Title Foreclosures (Original Motion so voted with majority vote) 12 , 000 . 00 

42,602.00 

Collector 

Salary-Collector 16,849.00 

Other Salaries 13,105.00 

Expenses 4, 760.00 

34,714.00 

Town Clerk 

Salary-Town Clerk 14,564.00 

Other Salaries 12,378.00 

Expenses 650 . 00 

27,592.00 

Board of Assessors 

Salary-Principal Assessor 26,291.00 

Other Salaries 21,720.00 

Expenses 3,200.00 

Capital Outlay 

51,211.00 

Town Counsel 

Salary (Retainer) 15,000.00 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 9 , 000 . 00 

24,000.00 

Town Hall 

Salaries 22,256.00 

Expenses 21,675.00 

Capital Outlay 

43,931.00 

Planning Board 

Salary 3,500.00 

Expenses 12,150.00 

Capital Outlay , 

15,650.00 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 391,743.00 

PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salary - Chief 25,000.00 

Lieutenant 21,000.00 

Sergeants 112,729.00 

Patrolmen 126,630.00 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois: "I move that the sum of $406,630 be appropriated for Police 
Department Salaries - Patrolmen; the sum of $280,000 to be raised by transfer from the 
Revenue Sharing Account, and the balance of $126,630 to be raised by taxation." Motion 
so voted.) 

Traffic Supervisors 



86 



Police Department (continued) 

(Motion by Aldo Caira: "I move to amend the line item Traffic Supervisors in the 
category of Protection Person & Property, by adding the sum of $30,197. Motion lost. 
Vote No 307 Yes 109.) 

Clerks $ 23,454.00 

(Motion by James Miceli: "I move that we amend Protection Persons & Property line item 
Clerks from $23,454 to $34,454 " Mrs. Dec then made a motion to eliminate the second 
Clerk making only one. No vote on this motion. Mr. Miceli 's motion lost. Original amount 
so voted with majority vote. 

Vacation Pay- Fill-in Cost 45,000.00 

Sick Leave Pay - Fill-in Cost 30,000.00 

Miscellaneous Extra Details 35,000.00 

Paid Holidays 27,300.00 

Police Dog 800.00 

Specialists 4,650.00 

Night Shift Differential 8,500.00 

Expenses 42,325.00 

Capital Outlay 

502,388.00 

Constable 

Salaries 100.00 

Fire Department 

Salary - Chief 34.698.00 

Deputy Chief 23,315.00 

Lieutenants 75,684.00 

Privates 155,364.00 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois: "I move that the sum of $435,364 be appropriated for Fire 
Department Salaries - Privates; and that the sum of $280,000 be raised by transfer from 
the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $155,364 to be raised by taxation." 
Second Motion by John Brown: "I move to amend the line item Protection Persons & 
Property - Salaries - Privates, from 435,364 to $445,364 " Motion lost. This motion 
was moved for reconsideration at 6:20 p.m. before adjournment. Motion lost again. 
Original motion so voted.) 

Call Fire and Ambulance 18,000.00 

Vacations - Fill-in Cost. 30,000.00 

Sick Leave - Fill-in Cost 14,000.00 

Paid Holidays 24,037.00 

Expenses 16,120.00 

Capital Outlay 7, 250.00 

398,468.00 

Civil Defense 

Salary 1,500.00 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

1, 500.00 

Dog Officer 

Salary 4,700.00 

Expenses 3,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

7,700.00 

Building Inspector 

Salary - Building Inspector 19,279.00 

Other Salaries 12,662.00 

Expenses 1,725.00 

Capital Outlay 

33,666.00 



8 7 



Board of Appeals 

Salary $ 2,000.00 

Expenses 260.00 

Capital Outlay 

2, 260.00 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salary 1,500.00 

Expenses i. 50.00 

1,550.00 

TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 947,632.00 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Town Engineer 

Salary - Town Engineer 26,723.00 

Other Salaries . . _ 58,268.00 

Expenses ' 2, 100.00 

87,091.00 

Highway 

Salary - Superintendent 24,937.00 

Other Salaries . 243,651.00 

Expenses 149,350.00 

Capital Outlay 

Drainage Projects 25,000.00 

Sidewalk Program , 

Public Street Lights (Original motion so voted with majority vote) 108,000.00 

Road Machinery - Expenses 50,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

Chapter 90 Construction 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois: "I move that the sum of $43,232 be appropriated for Chapter 
90 Construction; $43,232 to be raised by transfer from the Chapter 356, Acts of 1977 
Account, with the balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Motion so voted.) 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 9,000.00 

(Motion made to increase "Other Salaries" from $243,651 to $262,151 Motion lost.) 609,938.00 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 50,000.00 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 81,099.00 

Expenses 102,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

183,099.00 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 29,413.00 

Expenses 4,600.00 

Capital Outlay 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 21,903.00 

Expenses . . . 2,500.00 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 16,105.00 

Expenses 2, 500.00 

77,021.00 

Cemetery 

Salary - Superintendent 17,940.00 

Other Salaries 60,773.00 

Expenses 5,447.00 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois: "I move the sum of $15,300 be appropriated for the Cemetery 
Expenses Account, $9,853 to be raised by transfer from the Sale of Cemetery lots Acct. 
and balance of $5,447 to be raised by taxation." Motion so voted.) 



88 



Cemetery (continued) 

Capital Outlay $ 

84, 160.00 

Parks 

Salaries 5,000.00 

Expenses 1,000.00 

Capital Outlay _^ 

6,000.00 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 1,097,309.00 

HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 22,774.00 

Other Salaries 49,188.00 

Expenses 2,050.00 

Hospital & Medical Care 850.00 

Solid Waste Disposal 190,000.00 

Drug Dependency Problems 13,500.00 

Mental Health Out-Patient 17 ,000. 00 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 295,362.00 

VETERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part-Time Agent 2,915.00 

Other Salaries 10,557.00 

Expenses 325.00 

Assistance - Veterans 20,000.00 

TOTAL VETERANS' AID 33,797.00 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

School Maintenance & Operations 

Salary - Superintendent 22,147.00 

Salaries - Other 691,871.00 

Expenses 156,500.00 

Fuel Heating 336,000.00 

Roof Repairs 30,000.00 

(Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to amend the line item, Roof 

Repairs, to read $30,000 in the School Maintenance & Operations Account. Motion so 

voted. ) 

Cost of Vandalism 18,000.00 

Capital Outlay 5.520.00 

1,260,038.00 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses 9,800.00 

Capital Outlay 500.00 

10,300.00 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 86,500.00 

Capital Outlay 

86,500.00 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1,356,838.00 
LIBRARY 

Salary - Director 21,520.00 

Salaries - Others 125,984.00 

Expenses 55,331.00 



89 



Library (continued) 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois: "I move that the sum of $61,745 be appropriated for the 
Library Account; $6,414 to be raised by transfer from the State Aid to Public 
Libraries Account and the balance of $55,331 to be raised by taxation." So voted.) 

Capital Outlay $ 

RECREATION 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

TOTAL RECREATION 

BEAUTIFICATION 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Harnden Tavern 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Personal Servies 

Expenses 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Motion by Lester White of the School Committee: "I move that it be and hereby is the 
determination of the School Committee that the sum of $7,973,675 is the amount necessary 
for the support and operation of the public school in the Town of Wilmington for the 
1979-1980 fiscal year, and that the budget for 1979-80 be reduced by the estimated re- 
maining unspent funds in the federal accounts under public laws 864 and 874 in the amount 
of $50,000.00 leaving an amount of $7,923,675 to be raised by taxation." Motion so voted. 
A second motion by George Boylen was heard to lower the tax cap. This motion was not voted 
on because it was for a lesser amount.) (Original motion so voted with majority vote.) 

Vocational Training 

Regional Vocational School District 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Before the final closing of the School Department Budget, Mr. Brooks asked that the 
Towns people be informed that the Wilmington Rotary Club has presented the Wilmington 
Public School System with a Universal Senturion Machine-Athletic-16 Stations, and he 
wanted to go on record thanking them in behalf of the school system. Mr. Callan made 
a motion that the voters of the Town recorgnize this fact and give a unanimous vote 
thanking the Rotary Club. The response was unanimously in favor.) 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services 

Expenses (So voted as amended) 

(Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to amend the line item expenses 
in the Council on Aging Account to read $31,927 from 27,627.") 

Capital Outlay 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 

General Government 



1,575.0 



204,410.0 



20,744.0 
78,595.01' 
26,740.0i 



126,079.01 



500. 0( 
700.00 
I 

1,200.0( 



2,200.0( 
1,585.0( 



3,785.0( 



7,923,675.00 

8,950.00 
564,119.00 



8,496,744.00 



16,500.00 
31,927.00 



48,427.00 



370,387.00 
91,581.00 



90 



Maturing Debt & Interest (continued) 

Water 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois; "I move that the sum of $197,000 be appropriated for Maturing 

Debt and Interest - Water; $197,000 to be raised by transfer from Water Available Surplus, 

with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Motion so voted.) 

Sewer 231,040.00 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 50 , 000 . 00 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 743,008.00 

UNCLASSIFIED AND RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds 229,621.00 

Reserve Fund 50,000.00 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield & Group Life 58,209.00 

(Motion by Joyce Brisbois; "I move that the sum of $475,000 be appropriated for Blue Cross- 
Blue Shield & Group Life; $416,791 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash and the 

balance of $58,209 to be raised by taxation." Motion so voted.) 

Location Transportation 5,615.00 

Town Report 3,000.00 

Sewer Maintenance 4,000.00 

250th Year Anniversary Committee 

Appraisals - E.D.P. & Inventories 7,500.00 

Training & Conference-In State 

Training & Conference-Out of State 

Veteran's Retirement 42,000.00 

Employee s Retirement (Unused Sick Leave) 20,000.00 

Incentive Pay-Police 19,500.00 

Incentive Pay-Fire & E.M.T 17,400.00 

1980 Salary Adjustment & Additional Costs 195,000.00 

Additional Employees 

Unemployment Payments - Town & School 50 , 000. 00 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 701,845.00 

(At the completion of the Budget a motion was made by the Town Manager, Sterling Morris; 
"I move that the Town vote to approve the Fiscal 1980 Budget, tax appropriations, use of 
available funds and tax levy, except the Fiscal 1980 Budget of the School Committee, and 
to exceed the tax cap and tax cap legislation as provided in the Tax Cap Bill, House #5959." 
A standing vote was taken. Motion voted by more than a 2/3rds vote. YES 253 NO 25.) 

(Motion by Lester White; "I move that the Town vote to approve the Fiscal 1980 budget of 
the School Committee and to exceed the tax cap and tax cap legislation as provided in the 
Tax Cap Bill, House #5959." A standing vote was taken. Motion voted by more than a 2/3rds 
vote. YES 205 NO 75.) 

With the completion of the budget and 2/3rds general vote on same, the Moderator asked that 
someone move to adjourn. Mr. Morris so moved and it was seconded by Aldo Caira. So voted. 
The meeting recessed for dinner at 6:40 P.M. and was to reconvene at 8:00 P.M. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of the 
several following items of capital expenditures and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the 
several items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so designated; or do anything in 



The recessed Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 8:15 P.M. with a quorum being present. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
several following items of capital expenditures and further to authorize the sale or tur 
several items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so designated; or 
relation thereto. 



91 



Article 6 (continued) 

•Motion by Mr. Morris : "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate designated sums foi 
the purchase of the several items of capital expenditures and to authorize the sale or turn-in of the 
several items so designated, each item to be voted on separately." Motion seconded and so voted. 

a. Police Department 

1. To purchase four Police vehicles. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $26,000. for the 
purchase of four Police vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-i 
in of vehicles presently used by the Police Department." Finance Committee approved $26,000. Motion 
so voted. YES 305 NO 34. 

b. Fire Department 

1. To purchase a vehicle to be used by Chief. 

Motion: "I move that we pass over this article and take no action thereon." Finance Committee recommend 
disapproval. Motion so voted to pass over. 

2. To purchase 10-circuit Fire Alarm Switchboard. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $15,000. for the 
purchase of a 10-circuit Fire Alarm Switchboard for the use of the Fire Department." Finance Committee 
approved $15,000. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

c. Highway Department 

1. To purchase one dump truck with coverall assembly. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $24,675. for the 
purchase of a dump truck with coverall assembly for the use of the Highway Department, and at the 
discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a dump truck presently used by the High 1 
way Department." Finance Committee approved $24,675. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

2. To purchase two pickup trucks. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $7,269. for the 
purchase of one(l) pickup truck for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Tow 
Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of one (1) pickup truck presently used by the Highway Department. 
Finance Committee approved $7,269 for one pickup truck. Motion so voted and seconded unanimously. 

d. Public Buildings 

1. To purchase a pickup truck. 

Motion: "I move that we pass over this article and take no action thereon." Finance Committee recommem 
disapproval. Motion so voted and passed over. 

2. New leaching bed for North Intermediate sewage disposal system 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $47,700. to cover tl 
cost of a new leaching bed for sewage disposal system at the North Intermediate School." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. YES 334 NO 12. Passed by 2/3rds vote. 

3. Irrigation system for High School football field . 
Motion: "I move that we pass over this article and take no 
disapproval. Motion so voted and passed over. 

4. Grade and sod High School football field . 
Motion: "I move that we pass over this article and take no 
disapproval. Motion so voted and passed over. 

5. Irrigation system for the North Intermediate soccer and 
Motion: "I move that we pass over this article and take no 
disapproval. Motion so voted and passed over. 

6. Change baseball field to Softball field. 
Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $26,500. to improve 
the ballfields at Shawsheen School." Finance Committee recommends approval of $26,500. Motion voted 
and lost. NO 305 YES 54. 



action thereon." Finance Committee recommem 



action thereon." Finance Commit 



tee recommend 



baseball field, 
action thereon." Finance Committee recommend 



92 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000. for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge 
of said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. 
Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,000. 
for the observance of Memorial Day and Veteran's Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of said observances. Motion seconded and voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750. each (or a total of $1,500) 
for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended the 
lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the' purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $750. each 
(or a total of $1,500.) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws as amended the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion. 

Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion seconded and so voted. YES 195 NO 103. Motion by James 
Banda for reconsideration of this motion. Motion passed by 2/3rds vote. YES 310 NO 57. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or the Town Manager to apply 
for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditures of any funds, without further 
appropriations, allotted to Wilmington by the U.S. Federal Government under any federal grant program; or do 
anything in relation thereto. Motion by Sterling Morris same as above. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted by 2/3rds vote. YES 274 NO 39. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, 
Section 53C, which provides for a revolving fund to pay for off-duty work details for members of the 
Wilmington Police Department, I.B.P.O.; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of the Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 44, Section 53C and to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $5,000. to provide a revolv- 
ing fund to pay for off-duty work details for the members of the Wilmington Police Department, I.B.P.O. 
Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion seconded and voted. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provision of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 90, 
Section 20C, which authorizes the Board of Selectmen to adopt regulations to establish a schedule of parking 
fines; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Aldo Caira: "I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 90, Section 20C, which authorizes the Board of Selectmen to adopt regulations to establish a 
schedule of parking fines. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layouts of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways and specific repairs thereon), which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein, are hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said 
ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto: 



93 



Article 12 (continued) 

a. Freeport Drive, from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 

b. Heather Drive, from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 

c. Lucaya Circle, from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 

d. Sparhawk Drive, from Park Street to Heather Drive 

e. Gandalf Way, from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 

f. Agostino Drive, from Gandalf Way 

g. Clorinda Road, from Agostino Drive 

h. North Washington Avenue, from Agostino Drive 

i. Everett Avenue, from Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 

Motion by Rocco DePasquale: "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town Ways, the layouts of the following 
described streets, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of 
General Laws Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance 
of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon, which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk and 
which, with plans therein are hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may b 
necessary to effect the purpose of this article; and vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$900. for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the 
taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor: 

a. Freeport Drive, from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 

b. Heather Drive from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 

c. Lucaya Circle from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 

d. Sparhawk Drive from Park Street to Heather Drive 

e. Gandalf Way, from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 

f. Agostino Drive, from Gandalf Way 

g. Clorinda Road, from Agostino Drive 

h. North Washington Avenue, from Agostino Drive 

i. Everett Avenue, from Faulkner to Cunningham Street 

Motion seconded and so voted. Finance Committee recommends approval. Amount approved $900. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layouts of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments and Chapter 82, as amended, relating 
to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon) 
which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which with plans therein are hereby referred to 
for a more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domair 
such land, slope, and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any 
damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements therefor; or do anything ir 
relation thereto: 



a. Dexter Street, from Main Street 480 feet westerly 

b. King Street Extension, from Glen Road 487 feet southerly 

c. Reading Avenue, from Oakwood Road 215 feet easterly 

Motion by A. John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town ways the layouts of the following 
described streets, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of 
General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments and Chapter 82, as amended 
relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs 
thereon) which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, are hereby 
referred to for a more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slop and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose 
of this Article, and to vote to raise by Bond Issue the designated sum of each street for the purpose of 
construction and said ways and for payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease- 
ments and other easements therefor; 

a. Dexter Street, from Main Street 480 feet westerly - $39,100. 

b. King Street Extenstion, from Glen Road 487 feet southerly - $35,300. 

c. Reading Avenue, from Oakwood Road 215 feet easterly - $35,300. 

Finance Committee recommends approval $95,500 by Bond Issue. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

94 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of the following described 
street, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways and specific repairs thereon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein, is hereby referred to for a more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation 
or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of laying out said way and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor; 
or do anything in relation thereto: 

a. Olson Street, from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue (E & W) 

Motion by Rocco DePasquale: "I move that we pass over this article and take no action thereon. Motion so 
voted and passed over." 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Sections 16A through 16F, inclusive, of 
Chapter 83 of the General Laws as established by Chapter 586 of the Acts of 1977 and as most recently amended 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George R. Allan: "I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 16A through 16F, 
inclusive, of Chapter 83 of the General Laws as established by Chapter 586 of the Acts of 1977 and as most 
recently amended." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 
Section III-l-B-5; or do anything in relation thereto: 

Motion by William G. Hooper of the Planning Board: "I move that we pass over this article." Finance Committee 
recommends disapproval. Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding to 
Section VT-2 the following: 

In the event that fire or other disaster renders a single family dwelling uninhabitable, if so certified by the 
Building Inspector to be uninhabitable, the temporary use of a house trailer shall be permitted as a sub- 
stitute dwelling for a period not to exceed nine (9). months; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by William G. Hooper of the Planning Board: "I move that this article be passed over." Motion so 
voted and passed over. 

At this point in the meeting, the Moderator adjourned the Annual Town Meeting and opened the Special Town 
Meeting. At 10:15 P.M., a quorum being present the Moderator reread the Warrant. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 19, 1979 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington by deleting Sections 1 and 3 from Chapter 2 and substituting therefor the following: 

"Section 1. The Annual Town Meeting for the election of Town Officers shall be held on the third 
Saturday in April of each year. 

"Section 3. All matters to be considered under the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, except the 
election and determination of such matters as are required by law to be elected or determined by 
ballot, shall be considered at an adjournment of such meeting to be held at one-thirty P.M. on the 
fourth Saturday of April."; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington by deleting Sections 1 and 3 from Chapter 2 and substituting therefor the following: 



95 



Article 1 (continued) 



"Section 1. The Annual Meeting for the election of Town Officers shall be held on the third Saturda 
in April of each year." 

"Section 3. All matters to be considered under the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, except the 
election and determination of such matters as are required by law to be elected or determined by 
ballot, shall be considered at an adjournment of such meeting to be held at one-thirty p.m. on the 
fourth Saturday of April." 

Second Motion by Sterling Morris: "I move that the Revised By-Law be further amended by voting to add the 
following language at the end of Section 3 as follows: 

"in the year for which the warrant is drawn. The Warrant for every annual Town Meeting shall contai 
a statement by which the meeting is adjourned to such time for such purpose." Motion so voted as 
amended. Motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend, in accordance with the Home Rule Procedures Act, Chapter 
592 of the Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of 
Wilmington "by changing the date under Section 17, from the twentieth day of December to the seventh day of 
February. This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the election at which this charter amendment is 
approved; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Letter from the Town Manager filed with the Town Clerk, April 30, 1979. 

Mrs. Priscilla R. Ward 
Town Clerk 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, MA 01887 
Dear Mrs. Ward: 

I wish to file with you the following statement in accordance with Section 10 of Chapter 43B of the General 
Laws : 

I propose that Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, an Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government 
for the Town of Wilmington, be amended by changing the date under Section 17, from the twentieth day 
of December to the Seventh day of February. 



Very truly yours, 

s/ Sterling C. Morris 
Town Manager 

Motion by A. John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to amend in accordance with the Home Rule Procedures 
Act, Chapter 592 of Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the 
Town of Wilmington" by changing the date under Section 17, from the twentieth day of December to the seventh 
day of February." This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the election at which this charter amendmenl 
is approved. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law, Section VTII-4C.4. b) 
adding after the words "filing thereof." the following: "The applicant shall notify all abutters in writing 
not less than twenty-one (21) days prior to the public hearing on said special permit."; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



Motion by Jacqueline D. Allaman: "I move to amend the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law, Section VIII-4.C.4. 
by adding after the words "filing thereof." the following: "The Board of Appeals shall notify all persons 
required to be given notice, pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws 40A, Section 11, in writing, not less 
than twenty-one (21) days prior to the public hearing on said special permit." or do anything in relation 
thereto. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 



96 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law by deleting in its 
entirety Section III-4.A.13. which reads, "Research or testing laboratory, excluding the raising or keeping 
of animals.", or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Jacqueline D. Allaman, for the North Wilmington Betterment Association, "I move to amend the Town 
of Wilmington Zoning By-Law by deleting in its entirety Section III-4.A.13. which reads, "Research or test- 
ing laboratory, excluding the raising or keeping of animals." and inserting in Section III-4.B. the follow- 
ing: 

"Research or testing laboratory, excluding the raising or keeping of animals, in which the operations 
involved do not cause hazard or nuisance through danger of fire or explosion or through creation or 
emission of noise, vibration, dust, waste, heat, smoke, fumes, odor, glare or any other hazardous 
substance." or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion made and seconded. Motion lost for want of 2/3rds vote. Vote was Yes 166 and No 164. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law by deleting in its 
entirety Section III-4.B.4. which reads, "Indoor breeding laboratory for medical or scientific research."; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Jacqueline D. Allaman, "I move that we pass over this article. Motion seconded and article passed 
over . 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law by deleting in its 
entirety Section III-4.B.5. which reads, "Any other lawful business, storage, or manufacturing use in which 
the operations involved do not result in greater hazard or nuisance through danger of fire or explosion or 
through creation or emission of noise, vibration, dust, waste, heat, smoke, fumes, odor, or glare than the 
uses specifically listed as permitted in this by-law."; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Jacqueline Allaman: "I move to amend the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law by deleting in its 
entirety Section III-4.B.5 which reads, "Any other lawful business, storage, or manufacturing use in which 
the operations involved do not result in greater hazard or nuisance through danger of fire or explosion or 
through creation or emission of noise, vibration, dust, waste, heat, smoke, fumes, odor, or glare than the 
uses specifically listed as permitted in this by-law."; or do anything in reltion thereto. 

Motion seconded and voted upon. Motion lost for want of 2/3rds vote. Vote was Yes 141 No 158. This 
article reconsidered at 12:11 p.m. and again lost. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington 
by voting to re-zone from General Business District and Single Residential A District to Industrial District 
the following described parcel of land, to wit: 

Beginning on Concord Street, the land bounded on the north by Concord Street; on the west by 
Route 1-93; on the South by the Ipswich River; and on the east by North Reading Town line; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move the Town of Wilmington amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington by voting to re-zone from General Business District and Single Residential A District to Indust- 
rial District the following described parcel of land, to wit: 

Beginning on Concord Street, the land bounded on the north by Concord Street; on the west by 
Route 1-93; on the South by the Ipswich River; and on the east by the North Reading Town line. 



Motion seconded and so voted. Motion lost Yes 6 and No 287. 



97 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the Surplus Revenue Account 198 the balances in the 
following listed bond issue accounts and to petition the General Court to authorize said transfers notwith- 
standing the provisions of MGL Chapter 44, Section 20; 



1110 


Woburn Street School 


3,339 


19 


1111 


Woburn Street Addition 


9,156 


61 


1115 


Shawsheen Avenue School 


43,938 


14 


1130 


West Intermediate School 


9,747 


22 


1140 


Wilmington Memorial Library 


40,410 


41 






106,591 


57 



or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Cain: "I move that the Town vote to transfer to the Surplus Revenue Account 198 the bala 
in the following listed bond issue accounts and to petition the General Court to authorize said transfers 
notwithstanding the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 20." Account #1110 Woburn St. School $3 , 339. IS' 
#1111 Woburn Street School Addition $9,156.61 #1115 Shawsheen Avenue School $43,938.14 #1130 West Inter- 
mediate School $9,747.22 #1140 Wilmington Memorial Library $40,410.41 a total of $106,591.57." Motion was 
seconded and so voted unanimously. 

The Special Town Meeting adjourned at 12:13 P.M. Attendance at meeting was 658 voters present in the after- 
noon and 466 voters present at the evening session. 

The Moderator made the motion that the Annual Town Meeting reconvene at 7:30 P.M. on Monday, May 21, 1979 in 
the High School Gymnasium. Motion so voted. 

Special Town Meeting Transfer $106,591.57 

Priscilla R. Ward 

Attest: Town Clerk, Wilmington 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING ADJOURNED AND CONTINUED - MAY 21, 1979 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE VOTERS OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS: 

The Annual Town Meeting of March 10, 1979 held on May 19, 1979 at the High School Gymnasium will continue 
on May 21, 1979 at 7:30 P.M. at the High School Gymnasium for the purpose of transacting the business of 
the Warrant posted February 16, 1979. In accordance with Chapter 22, of the Acts of 1979. 

Priscilla R. Ward 

Attest: Town Clerk, Wilmington 

On May 21, 1979 in the High School Gymnasium the above posted adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 
7:45 P.M. a Quorum being present. 

The Moderator asked the Town Clerk to make note that the adjourned Town Meeting had been properly posted. 
This was so noted. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington to create 
Planned Residential Development Districts for the purposes of permitting and regulating the construction of 
Planned Residential Developments by adding a new section to the Wilmington Zoning By-Law as follows: 

III-l.C PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT 

1. GENERAL REQUIREMENT: 

The Planning Board may grant a special permit for improvements in a PRD, providing that requirements 
set forth hereinafter and review and approval of site development plans are completed. 

2. INTENT AND PURPOSE: 

Planned Residential Development is an alternative pattern of land development to conventional sub- 
division, which allows development of a site as a single entity. It is intended to encourage 
creative land development, with a greater mixture and diversity of housing types and configurations 

98 



Article 18 (continued) 

within the town, as well as the preservation of open space. It also encourages: 

a. More efficient use of land while protecting natural resources, such as groundwater, 
wetlands, wildlife and other significant ecological features. 

b. More efficient utilization of municipal services. 

c. Effective control of growth and assurance of development of the highest quality. 

d. Enhancement of real property values for the long-range future. 

3. LOCATION: 

The PRD district shall be a separate zoning district with standards and regulations as herein 
setforth. The PRD district shall be designated on the Zoning Map upon approval of a Zoning Map 
amendment at Town Meeting. 

4. DEFINITIONS: 

a. PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT (PRD) - A PRD shall mean the development of a site of land as a 
single entity in which residential single family attached Townhouse Condominiums are clustered at a 
greater net density, the remaining land set aside as common open space for the use and enjoyment by 
the residents of the PRD. 

b. CONDOMINIUM - Individual Ownership of units combined with joint ownership of common areas of the 
building and common open space. 

c. COMMON OPEN SPACE (COS) - A parcel or parcels of land within the site designated for a PRD, main- 
tained and preserved for open spaces uses, intended for the use or enjoyment of the residents of the 
PRD, but not to include parking areas or ways, public or private, wetlands, flood plains and those 
portions of the site which have a slope greater than twenty (20) percent. 

d. HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION - A non-profit corporation consisting of the owners of residential units 
within a site approved for Planned Residential Development, which holds the title to all common 
property and which is responsible for the costs and maintenance of said property. 

e. APPLICANT - As defined in the Subdivision Control Law, Section 81L, Chapter 41 General Laws. 

f. FAMILY - (1) One or more persons related by blood, adoption or marriage, living and cooking as a 
single housekeeping unit; or (2) not more than two persons unrelated by blood, adoption or marriage, 
living and cooking together as a single housekeeping unit. 

g. FIRE PROTECTION AREA - The open space between a building in a Planned Residential Development and 

a line parallel to and twenty (20) feet equidistant from any such building, or structure, available for 
emergency access, within which no building or structure may be erected without written permission from 
the Chief of the Wilmington Fire Department. However, this shall not be construed to prohibit land- 
scaping . 

h. PRINCIPLE ACCESS DRIVEWAY: A service road or driveway, other than a public way or a way approved 
in accordance with the Sub-division Control Law, which provides the principle access for vehicles to 
the buildings in the PRD. 

i. DWELLING UNIT - As defined in Section II-2 of the Town of Wilmington's Zoning By-Law. 

5. BUILD ABLE LAND DETERMINATION: 

a. BUILDABLE LAND - The area of the site suitable for development shall be determined by the 
following formula; 

(1) Nonbuildable land, as hereinafter defined, shall be first deducted from the site proposed 
for development. 

(2) At a minimum, thirty- five (35) percent shall be set aside as Common Open Space for conserva- 
tion and recreation purposes. 

b. NON-BUILD ABLE LAND - shall include: 

(1) Wetlands as defined in Chapter 131 Section 40 of the General Laws of Massachusetts; a determin- 
ation to be made by the Conservation Commission as to whether an area is a wetland in accordance 
with the procedures under the Wetlands Protection Act, Chapter 131 Section 30 Subsection 3, for 
"determination of applicability". 

(2) Land located within a flood plain is defined in Section 11-14 of the Zoning By-Law and as 
delineated on the Zoning Map. 

(3) Those portions of the site which have a slope greater than twenty (20) percent. 
FORMULA: 

Site less non-buildable land less COS equals buildable land. 

6. DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: 

a. MINIMUM SITE SIZE - The minimum site size for a PRD shall be fifteen (15) acres. 

b. PERMISSIBLE DENSITY - The total number of dwelling units shall not exceed twice the permissible 
density allowed in a particular zoning district prior to the granting of the rezoning to PRD district 
except that the following density bonuses shall be allowed: 

(1) Transferable Development Rights: The density of the site may be increased by conveying to 
the Town, or by restricting for the benefit of the Town, land which is not within the PRD site 
and which at the time of the submission of an application under this section was in private 



99 



Article 18 (continued) 

ownership and unencumbered by a perpetual restriction of the type described in G.L. c.184 s.31 or any: 
restriction thereto, provided that the Planning Board determines that such transfer or restriction is( 
consonant with the purposes of this by-law and of sufficient benefit to the Town. The number of 
transferable units is obtained by determining the area of buildable and non-buildable land, and by 

(1) dividing each such area of land situated in any one or more zoning district (s) which the applicant 
proposes to convey or restrict by the minimum lot size permitted in the zoning district(s) within 
which such land is located, and by (2) multiplying the number obtained therefrom by the appropriate 
following percentages: 

(a) Fifty (50) percent if such conveyance is of the entire fee interest in the land none of which is* 
non-buildable land; or 

(b) Twenty (20) percent if such conveyance is of the entire fee interest in the land which is non- 
buildable land; or 

(c) Thirty (30) percent if such conveyance is of a perpetual restriction of the type described in 
G.L. c.184 s.31 upon land none of which is non-buildable land; or 

(d) Five (5) percent if such a conveyance is of a perpetual restriction of the type described in 
G.L. c.184 s.31 and such land is non-buildable. 

(2) Wetlands: The density of the site may be increased by one (1) dwelling unit per wetland acre on 
the site. 

(3) The maximum increase in density shall be two (2) and one-quarter (2.25) times permissible density 
allowed in a particular zoning district prior to the granting of the rezoning to PRD district. 

c. PERMITTED USES - There shall be permitted in a PRD: 

(1) Single family attached Townhouse Condominium units, 

(2) Accessory uses as defined in Section II-l of the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law. 

d. AREA OF RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT- The area covered by buildings and accessory uses thereto, exclud- 
ing recreational buildings, roads, parking areas, walkways and service or loading areas, shall not 
exceed forty (40) percent of the total PRD site. 

e. AREA FOR ROADS AND PARKING - The area covered by roads, parking areas, walkways, service and loa 
ing areas shall not exceed twenty-five (25) percent of the total PRD site. 

f. LOT AREA, FRONTAGE AND YARD REQUIREMENTS - There shall be no minimum lot area, frontage, or depth 
requirements within a PRD; however, minimum side yard, front yard, and rear yard set backs shall be 
equal to or greater than those required for adjacent land uses. 

g. BUILDING HEIGHT - No building shall be more than two and one-half (2\) stories or thirty-five (35 
feet in height, whichever is less, with no portions of the building occupied for dwelling purposes 
either below the mean finished grade at the perimeter of such building, or above the second (2nd) 
story . 

h. STREETS, ROADWAYS, AND DRIVEWAYS - Standards of design and construction for streets, roadways and 
driveways within PRD districts shall conform to the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regula- 
tions and Section IV-3.G of the Zoning By-Law. 

i. PARKING - The Developer shall provide two (2) off street parking spaces for each dwelling unit 
with one (1) bedroom, plus an average of one half (\) space for each additional bedroom greater than 
one for each dwelling unit in the PRD. Entrance and exit driveways, curbs, drainage, surfacing, ligh 
ing and screening, shall conform with the design and improvement requirements stated in the Town of 
Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations and Section IV-3 G of the Zoning By-Law. No more than 
thirty (30) parking spaces shall be allowed in any one open area. 

j. UTILITIES - The developer shall provide all required utilities for the PRD, and utility wires shall 
be installed, in conformity with the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations, 
k. COMMON OPEN SPACE - At least thirty-five (35) percent of the total area of the PRD site shall, 
except as provided below, remain unbuilt upon, and shall be used for conservation, non-commercial out- 
door recreation or playground purpose. Such land shall be hereafter referred to as "Common Open Space" 

(1) Five (5) percent of non-buildable land, if any, may be included as part of the Common Open Space 
(COS) . 

(2) The COS may be in one or more parcels of a size and shape appropriate for its intended use as 
determined by the Planning Board. 

(3) Recreational facilities and their accessory uses shall be permitted, as long as the total imper- 
vious surfaces constitute no more than ten (10) percent of the COS, provided that such structures 
shall in each case be consistent with the open space uses of such land. 

(4) Any structure built for recreational purposes or accessory thereto, shall not be more than twenty 
(20) feet in height . 

(5) Adequate non-vehicular access from one or more streets, roadways, driveways, or parking areas in 
the PRD shall be provided to each part of the COS which may be completely separated from other parts 
of the COS. 

(6) Improvements to the COS must be appropriate to the uses of the COS and must conserve and enhance 
the amenities of the COS with regard to the topography and unimproved condition of the land. 



... 



100 



Article 18 (continued) 

1. COMMON OPEN SPACE AND OTHER COMMON PROPERTY - OWNERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT: 

Provisions as to ownership, use and maintenance of the Common Open Space and other Common Property 
must be approved and specified by the Planning Board in the Special Permit for the PRD consistent with 
the requirements set forth. 

(1) The Common Open Space and other Common Property shall be conveyed to and owned by a non-profit 
corporation or unincorporated association, the owners or members of which shall be the owners of the 
dwelling units in the PRD or to a trust, the beneficiaries of which shall be the owners of the dwell- 
ing units in the PRD development. The principal purpose of such corporation, association or trust 
shall be the care, and maintenance and preservation of the Common Open Space and Other Common Property. 

(2) The Common Open Space may be conveyed to the Conservation Commission or Recreation Commission of 
the Town for playground or open space use, subject to the approval of the Board of Selectmen, with a 
trust clause insuring that it be maintained as open space. 

(3) Prior to the conveyance of the dwelling units in the PRD, there shall be recorded with the Middle- 
sex County North District Registry of Deeds an instrument or instruments acceptable in form and sub- 
stance to the Planning Board, the provisions of which shall be binding upon and insure to the benefit 
of all dwelling owners in the PRD and their successors in title, which shall at a minimum contain: 

(a) A legal description of the Common Open Space and other Common Property. 

(b) A statement of the purpose for which the COS is intended to be used and the restrictions on its 
use . 

(c) The type and name of the corporation, association or trust which will own, manage and maintain the 
Common Open Space, and other Common Property. 

(d) The ownership or beneficial interest in the corporation, association or trust of each owner of a 
dwelling unit in the PRD and a provision that such ownership or beneficial interest shall be appurte- 
nant to the dwelling unit to which it relates and may not be conveyed or encumbered separately 
therefrom. 

(e) Provisions for the number, term of office, and the manner of election to office, removal from 
office, an( j tne filling of vacancies in the office or directors or officers of the corporation, 

association or trustees of the trust. 

(f) Procedures for the conduct of the affairs and business of the corporation, association or trust 
including provision for the calling and holding of meetings of members or officers of the corporation, 
association or beneficiaries and trustees of the trust and provision for quorum and voting require- 
ments for action to be taken. Each owner of a dwelling unit shall have voting rights proportional to 
his ownership or beneficial interest in the corporation, association or trust. 

(g) Provision for the management, maintenance, operation, improvement and repair of the Common Open 
Space, facilities thereon, and other Common Property including provisions for obtaining and maintain- 
ing adequate insurance and levying and collecting from the dwelling owners common charges to pay for 
expenses associated with the COS and other Common Property, including real estate taxes. It shall be 
provided that common charges are to be allocated among the dwelling unit owners in proportion to their 
ownership or beneficial interests in the corporation, association or trust, and that each dwelling 
unit owner's share of the common charge shall be a lien against his real estate in the PRD, which 
shall have priority over all other liens, with the exception of municipal liens and first mortgages 

of record. 

(h) The method by which such instrument or instruments may be amended. 

(i) Until the corporation, association or trust is established and ready to assume responsibility for 
managing and maintaining the COS, and other Common Property, the developer shall continue to manage 
and maintain such land and common property. 

m. COMMON OPEN SPACE - INTERESTS OF THE TOWN 

The Planning Board shall insure by appropriate conditions in the Special Permit for PRD that: 

(1) Recorded restrictions, which will not be terminated by operation of law and will be enforceable by 
the Town, are imposed on the COS so its use shall be restricted to conservation, recreation or play- 
ground purposes consistent with the provisions of this section and the Special Permit granted by the 
Planning Board. 

(2) In order to collect due, but unpaid, municipal taxes and other charges assessed against or on 
account of the COS, the Town shall have the right to enforce or compel the enforcement of the liens 
on each dwelling unit owner's real estate in the PRD. 

(3) An easement is granted and recorded which will permit the Town to enter upon and to take all 
necessary steps to clean, repair and maintain the COS should the corporation, association or trust 
established for such purpose fail to adequately do so. In such case, the members of the corporation, 
association or beneficiaries of a trust shall be assessed charges in compensation for Town labor and 
materials used in the maintenance of the COS. The function of maintenance of the COS shall revert to 
the corporation, association or trust when deemed appropriate by the Board of Selectmen. 



101 



Article 18 (continued) 

n. SLOPES AND VEGETATION - All manufactured slopes, other than those constructed in rock shall be plant- ! 
ed or otherwise protected from the effects of storm runoff erosion and shall be of a character so as 
to cause the slope to blend with the surrounding terrain and development. The developer shall provide 
for the maintenance of the planting until growth is established. 

7. APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN: 

a. FILING FEE: All expenses for advertising, engineering, professional planning review, plans, in- 
spection, construction, recording and filing of documents and all other expenses in connection with a 
PRD shall be borne by the applicant and are not refundable. The filing fee shall be two hundred and 
twenty-five dollars ($225) per acre of which twenty-five (25) percent is payable on submission of a 
preliminary site plan. The remainder of the filing fee is payable on submission of a definitive site 
plan. 

b. PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL: 

(1) GENERAL: A preliminary* site plan of the entire proposed development, properly drawn and con- 
forming to the requirements herewith set forth, shall be filed with the Planning Board at regularly 
scheduled meeting, and twenty-five (25) percent of the filing fee. 

(2) PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN: The applicant shall provide the Planning Board with an original plus 
two (2) copies of the Preliminary site plan drawn at a scale of one (1) inch equals forty (40) feet. 
The plan shall be designated as a "Preliminary Site Plan", and shall form a clear basis for discus- 
sion of the details of the PRD, and for preparation of the Definitive Site Plan, the plan shall con- 
tain at a minimum, all of the requirements for a "Preliminary Plan" as specified in the Town of 
Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. In addition, the "Preliminary Site Plan" shall include 
the proposed location of residential buildings and accessory buildings. 

(3) SUPPORTING MATERIAL: Additional material to clarify and facilitate the interpretation of the 
plans shall be submitted to the Planning Board in written form when submitting the Preliminary Site 
Plan. 

c. REVIEW BY OTHER TOWN OFFICIALS: The applicant shall transmit copies of the Preliminary Site Plan 
within one (1) week to the following Town Officials: 

(1) One (1) copy each to the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Town Engineer, Water and 
Sewer Commission, Fire Department, Police Department, Building Inspector and Superintendent of 
Schools. Failure to do so may result in Planning Board rejection of the Preliminary Site Plan. 

(2) Written statements shall be required from the above officials to the Planning Board within 
thirty (30) days after receipt of the Preliminary Site Plan. In each of the above cases the Planning 
Board will assume that the respective officials have no comment if no report is received in thirty 
(30) days. 

d. PLANNING BOARD DUTIES: 

(1) The Planning Board shall give such Preliminary Site Plan approval, approval with conditions or 
disapproval within forty-five (45) days from submission of such plan. In the event of disapproval, 
the Planning Board shall state in writing the reason(s) for its disapproval. 

8. APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR SPECIAL PERMIT AND DEFINITIVE SITE PLAN: 

a. FILING FEE: All expenses for advertising, engineering, professional planning review, plans, in- 
spection, construction, recording and filing of documents and all other expenses in connection with a 
PRD shall be borne by the applicant and are not refundable. The filing fee shall be two hundred and 
twenty-five dollars ($225) per acre of which seventy- five (75) percent is payable on submission of 
the Special Permit Application and Definitive Site Plan. 

b. APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL PERMIT AND DEFINITIVE SITE PLAN APPROVAL: 

(1) GENERAL: A Special Permit Application for and a definitive site plan of the entire, proposed 
development, properly drawn and conforming to the requirements herewith set forth, shall be filed 
with the Planning Board at a regularly scheduled meeting, and seventy- five (75) percent of the filing 
fee . 

(2) SPECIAL PERMIT AND DEFINITIVE SITE PLAN: An application for a Special Permit to develop a PRD 
must be filed with the Planning Board, and a duplicate with the Town Clerk, at the time when the 
Definitive Site Plan is submitted. The Definitive Site Plan shall contain, at a minimum, all the 
requirements for a "Definitive Plan" as specified in the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and 
Regulations. In addition, the "Definitive Site Plan" shall include the proposed location of resident- 
ial buildings and accessory buildings. 

(3) SUPPORTING MATERIAL: Additional material to clarify and facilitate the interpretation of the 
plans shall be submitted to the Planning Board in written form when submitting the Definitive Site 
Plan, including: 

(a) The form of organization that will own, manage and maintain the COS and other common property. 

(b) All covenants, restrictions and easements to be imposed on the land, including the use of the 
COS, other common property and facilities thereon. 

(4) DESIGN REQUIREMENTS : The definitive site plan shall incorporate all the requirements for site 
improvement as specified in the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations and in Section 



102 



Article 18 (continued) 

IV-3.G of the Zoning By-Law. 

c. REVIEW BY OTHER TOWN OFFICIALS: The review procedure by other Town Officials shall be the same 
procedure as set forth in Section I.e. of this By-Law. 

d. PLANNING BOARD DUTIES: 

(1) The Planning Board shall hold a public hearing within sixty-five (65) days of the filing of the 
Special Permit Application and Definitive Site Plan. Notice of the Public Hearing shall be as set 
forth in Section 9 Chapter 40A G.L. 

(2) The Planning Board shall give such Definitive Site Plan approval, approval with conditions or 
disapproval within ninety (90) days following the public hearing. The Planning Board, where necessary 
preserve the public health, safety and welfare, may impose further restrictions upon the site, or 
parts thereof, as a conditions to the granting of the Special Permit. If the Planning Board deter- 
mines that all the requirements of this By-Law have been met, it shall grant a Special Permit. In the 
event of disapproval the Planning Board shall state in writing the reason(s) for its disapproval. 

(3) If the Planning Board fails to act upon a Special Permit application for the PRD or fails to 
notify the Town Clerk and the person submitting the PRD application of its action within (90) days 
following the public hearing, it shall be deemed approved by the Planning Board. 

e. RECORDING: The applicant shall cause to be recorded with an outline survey of the site, the 
approved Special Permit and all other legal documents which have become a part of the permit. 

f. PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE: The improvements shown on the approved definitive site plan and incorpora- 
ted in the approved Special Permit shall be guaranteed by the developer in the same manner as specifi- 
ed in the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 

9. OTHER REQUIREMENTS: 

a. SUBDIVISION OF LAND: No lot shown on a plan for which a special permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided and a notation to that effect shall be endorsed upon the plan. 

b. BOARD OF APPEALS PROCEDURE: The Board of Appeals procedure shall be as provided for in the Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Wilmington. 

and by amending the Wilmington Zoning By-Law in the following manner: 
SECTION 1-2. A. ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF DISTRICTS 

Delete: A. For the purpose of this by-law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the follow- 
ing districts. 

1. Rural Districts (R) 

2. Single-Residence-A Districts (SRA) 

3. Single-Residence-B Districts (SRB) 

4. Neighborhood Business Districts (NB) 

5. General Business Districts (GB) 

6. Industrial Districts (IND) 

7. High Density Traffic Business Districts (HDTB) 

8. Flood Plain Districts (W) 

and substitute: A. For the purpose of this by-law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the 
following districts. 

1. Rural Districts (R) 

2. Single-Residence-A Districts (SRA) 

3. Single-Residence-B Districts (SRB) 

4. Planned Residential Development Districts (PRD) 

5. Neighborhood Business Districts (NB) 

6. General Business Districts (GB) 

7. Industrial Districts (IND) 

8. High Density Traffic Business Districts (HDTB) 

9. Flood Plain Districts (W) 
SECTION 1-3. LOTS IN MORE THAN ONE DISTRICT 

Add: "Except in a Planned Residential Development District," .... 
SECTION IV- 3. A. OFF STREET PARKING 

Add: "Except in a Planned Residential Development District," .... 
SECTION IV-4. SCREENING OF OPEN USES 

Delete the words: (a Single-Residence-A or Single-Residence-B District.) 

and substitute: "a Single-Residence-A, District, Single Residence-B District or a Planned 
Residential Development District." 
SECTION V, Subsection V-l. SCHEDULE OF REQUIREMENTS 

To add under the caption "HEIGHT, AREA AND YARD REGULATIONS" the following new schedule of require- 
ments : . . . . 

1. Under the heading (District) below (Single-Residence-B District) the words: "Planned Residential 
Development District (PRD)"; 



103 



Article 18 (continued) 

2. Under all of the remaining headings, the words.... "As allowed in Section III-l.C". 
SECTION VIII-2.B Permit Applications 

Add in the final paragraph, following (authorized by) and before (the) the following: .... "the Plann- 
ing Board for uses under Section III-l.C, and".... 
SECTION VIII-4.B.1. Powers 

And a new subparagraph as follows: "b. Appeals from decisions of the Planning Board in Planned 

Residential Development Districts.. 
SECTION VIII-4.B.2 Powers 

And a new subparagraph as follows: "c. Permits for Planned Residential Development Districts as 

provided in Section III-l.C; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Planning Board. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Louis A. Maglio, "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington 
to create planned Residential Development Districts for the purpose of permitting and regulating the 
construction of Planned Residential Developments by adding a new section to the Wilmington Zoning By-Law as 
follows : 

At this point the Moderator asked if the article read as the Warrant Article. Mr. Maglio answered in 
the affirmative. The Moderator then asked that he refrain from the further reading of same. After much 
discussion John DeRoy read an amendment to the article, proposed by the Planning Board. Motion by John 
DeRoy, "I move that the Town vote to amend Article 18, Section III-l.C. 6. DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS by deleting, 
in its entirety subparagraph j. UTILITIES and substituting it with the following: 

j. UTILITIES - Planned Residential Developments shall be connected to a public sanitary sewer system 
and the developer shall provide all required utilities for the PRD, and utility wires shall be 
installed, in conformity with the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 
The Amendment to the article was so voted and lost. A standing vote was taken for the main ARTICLE 18. 
Vote was No 255 and Yes 98. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to make as part of the Planned Residential Development District 
and so classify the land on and off Salem Street, Containing 21.5 acres, more or less, more particularly 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by Salem Street two hundred seventy-nine (279) feet more or less; 

Westerly by lands now or formerly of Simpson, Dillaway, Priggin and Barrows seven hundred sixty-two 
(762) feet more or less; 

Southwesterly by land now or formerly of Coombs three hundred fifty (350) feet more or less; 
Westerly: by land now or formerly of Coombs and Emmons four hundred (400) feet more or less; 
Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Emmons one hundred sixty-five (165) feet more or less; 
Northerly by land now or formerly of Earle S. Hamilton one hundred thirty-five (135) feet more or less: 
Westerly by land now or formerly of said Hamilton and Coombs three hundred sixty- five (365) feet more 
or less; 

Northerly by land now or formerly of Coombs forty (40) feet more or less; 

Westerly by land now or formerly of Hamilton one hundred forty-four (144) feet more or less; 
Northerly by land now or formerly of Hamilton one hundred fifty (150) feet more or less; 
Westerly by Middlesex Avenue forty (40) feet more or less; 

Southerly by land now or formerly of Allen four hundred (400) feet more or less; 
Westerly by land now or formerly of Allen one hundred ninety (190) feet more or less; 
Southeasterly by Route 62 one thousand four hundred twenty-one (1421) feet more or less; 
Easterly by Route 93 seven hundred forty-five (745) feet more or less. 

Being shown as Lot 4Z on Sheet 96 of the Town of Wilmington Property Map, or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Paul Butt asked that the article be withdrawn. Motion so voted 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington to create 
PLANNED RESIDENTIAL APARTMENT DISTRICTS for the purposes of permitting and regulating the construction of 
Planned Residential Apartments by adding a new section to the Wilmington Zoning By-Law as follows: 
III-l. D. PLANNED RESIDENTIAL APARTMENT DISTRICT 

1. GENERAL REQUIREMENT: 

The Planning Board may grant a special permit for improvements in a PRA, provided that require- 
ments set forth hereinafter and review and approval of site development plans are completed. 

2. INTENT AND PURPOSE: 

Planned Residential Apartment Development is an alternative pattern of land development to 
conventional subdivision, which allows development of a site as a single entity. It is intended to 
encourage creative land development, with a greater mixture and diversity of housing types and 



104 



Article 20 (continued) 

configurations within the town, as well as the preservation of open space. It also encourages: 

a. More efficient use of land while protecting natural resources, such as groundwater, wetlands, 
wildlife and other significant ecological features. 

b. More efficient utilization of municipal services. 

c. Effective control of growth and assurance of development of the highest quality. 

d. Enhancement of real property values for the long-range future. 

3. LOCATION: 

The PRA district shall be a separate zoning district with standards and regulations as herein 
setforth. The PRA district shall be designated on the Zoning Map upon approval of a Zoning Map 
amendment at Town Meeting. 

4. DEFINITIONS: 

a. PLANNED RESIDENTIAL APARTMENT DEVELOPMENT (PRA) - A PRA shall mean the development of a site of 
land as a single entity in which residential single family attached Apartments are clustered at a greater 
net density, the remaining land set aside as open space for the purpose of preserving open space. 

b. APPLICANT - As defined in the Subdivision Control Law, Section 81L, Chapter 41 General Laws. 

c. FAMILY - (1) One or more persons related by blood, adoption or marriage, living and cooking as 
a single housekeeping unit; or (2) not more than two persons unrelated by blood, adoption or marriage, 
living and cooking together as a single housekeeping unit. 

d. FIRE PROTECTION AREA - The open space between a building in a Planned Residential Apartment 
Development and a line parallel to and twenty (20) feet equidistant from any such building, or structure, 
available for emergency access, within which no building or structure may be erected without written 
permission from the Chief of the Wilmington Fire Department. However, this shall not be construed to 
prohibit landscaping. 

e. PRINCIPLE ACCESS DRIVEWAY - A service road or driveway, other than a public way or a way 
approved in accordance with the Sub-division Control Law, which provided the principle access for 
vehicles to the buildings in the PRA development. 

f. DWELLING UNIT - As defined in Section II-2 of the Town of Wilmington's Zoning By-Law. 

5. BUI ID ABLE LAND DETERMINATION: 

a. BUILDABLE LAND - The area of the site suitable for development shall be determined by the 
following formula: 

(1) Nonbuildable land, as hereinafter defined, shall be first deducted from the site proposed for 
development . 

(2) At a minimum, thirty-five (35) percent shall be set aside as Open Space for conservation and 
recreation purposes. 

b. NON -BUI ID ABLE LAND - shall include: 

(1) Wetlands as defined in Chapter 131 Section 40 of the General Laws of Massachusetts; a determin- 
ation to be made by the Conservation Commission as to whether an area is a wetland in accordance with 
the procedures under the Wetlands Protection Act, Chapter 131 Section 30 Subsection 3, for "determination 
of applicability." 

(2) Land located within a flood plain as defined in Section 11-14 of the Zoning By-Law and as 
delineated on the Zoning Map. 

(3) Those portions of the site which have a slope greater than twenty (20) percent. 
FORMULA: 

Site less Non-buildable Land less Open Space equals Buildable Land. 

6. DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: 

a. MINIMUM SITE SIZE -The minimum site size for a PRA shall be fifteen (15) acres. 

b. PERMISSIBLE DENSITY - The total number of dwelling units shall not exceed twice the permissible 
density allowed in a particular zoning district prior to the granting of the rezoning to PRA district 
except that the following density bonuses shall be allowed: 

(1) Transferable Development Rights: The density of the site may be increased by conveying to the 
Town, or by restricting for the benefit of the Town, land which is not within the PRA site and which at 
the time of the submission of an application under this section was in private ownership and unencumbered 
by a perpetual restriction of the type described in G.L. c. 184 s. 31 or any restriction thereto, provid- 
ed that the Planning Board determines that such transfer or restriction is consonant with the purposes 
of this by-law and of sufficient benefit to the Town. The number of transferable units is obtained by 
determining the area of buildable and non-buildable land, and by (1) dividing each such area of land 
situated in any one or more zoning district (s) which the applicant proposes to convey or restrict by the 
minimum lot size permitted in the zoning district (s) within which such land is located, and by (2) 
multiplying the number obtained therefrom by the appropriate following percentages: 

(a) Fifty (50) percent if such conveyance is of the entire fee interest in the land none of which is 
non-buildable land; or 

(b) Twenty (20) percent if such conveyance is of the entire fee interest in the land which is non- 
buildable land; ox 



105 



Article 20 (continued) 

(c) Thirty (30) percent if such conveyance is of a perpetual restriction of the type described in G.L. 
c.184 s.31 upon land none of which is non-buildable land; or 

(d) Five (5) percent if such conveyance is of a perpetual restriction of the type described in G.L. c.l 
s.31 and such land is non-buildable. 

(2) Wetlands^ The density of the site may be increased by one (1) dwelling unit per wetland acre on the , 
site . 

(3) The maximum increase in density shall be two (2) and one-quarter (2.25) times permissible density 
allowed in a particular zoning district prior to the granting of the rezoning to PRA district. 

c. PERMITTED USES - There shall be permitted in a PRA; 

(1) Single family attached Apartment units. 

(2) Accessory uses as defined in Section II-l of the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-Law. 

d. AREA OF RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT - The area covered by buildings and accessory uses thereto, excluding 
recreational buildings, roads, parking areas, walkways and service or loading areas, shall not exceed for; 
(40) percent of the total PRA site. 

e. AREA FOR ROADS AND PARKING - The area covered by roads, parking areas, walkways, service and loading! 
areas shall not exceed twenty- five (25) percent of the total PRA site. 

f. LOT AREA, FRONTAGE AND YARD REQUIREMENTS - There shall be no minimum lot area, frontage, or depth 
requirements within a PRA; however, minimum side yard, front yard, and rear yard set backs shall be equal 
to or greater than those required for adjacent land uses. 

g. BUILDING HEIGHT - No building shall be more than two and one-half (2\) stories or thirty-five (35) 
feet in height, whichever is less, with no portions of the building occupied for dwelling purposes either 
below the mean finished grade at the perimeter of such building, or above the second (2nd) story. 

h. STREETS, ROADWAYS, AND DRIVEWAYS - Standards of design and construction for streets, roadways and 
driveways within PRA districts shall conform to the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations 
and Section IV-3.G of the Zoning By-Law. 

i. PARKING - The Developer shall provide two (2) off street parking spaces for each dwelling unit with 
one (1) bedroom, plus an average of one half (%) space for each additional bedroom greater than one for 
each dwelling unit in the PRA. Entrance and exit driveways, curbs, drainage, surfacing, lighting and 
screening, shall conform with the design and improvement requirements stated in the Town of Wilmington 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations and Section IV-3.G of the Zoning By-Law. No more than thirty (30) park- 
ing spaces shall be allowed in any one open area. 

j. UTILITIES - The developer shall provide all required utilities for the PRA, and utility wires shall b 
installed, in conformity with the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 

k. OPEN SPACE - At least thirty- five (35) percent of the total area of the PRA site shall remain unbuil 
upon, and shall be used for conservation, non-commercial outdoor recreation or playground purpose. 

(1) Five (5) percent of non-buildable land, if any, may be included as part of the Open Space. 

(2) The Open Space may be in one or more parcels of a size and shape appropriate for its intended use as 
determined by the Planning Board. 

(3) Recreational facilities and their accessory uses shall be permitted, as long as the total impervious 
surfaces constitute no more than ten (10) percent of the Open Space, provided that such structures shall i 
each case be consistent with the open space uses of such land. 

(4) Any structure built for recreational purposes or accessory thereto, shall not be more than twenty 
(20) feet in height. 

1. SLOPES AND VEGETATION - All manufactured slopes, other than those constructed in rock, shall be planl 
ed or otherwise protected from the effects of storm runoff erosion and shall be of a character so as to 
cause the slope to blend with the surrounding terrain and development. The developer shall provide for th< 
maintenance of the planting until growth is established. 

7. APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN: 

a. FILING FEE: All expenses for advertising, engineering, professional planning review, plans, in- 
spection, construction, recording and filing of documents and all other expenses in connection with t 
PRA shall be borne by the applicant and are not refundable. The filing fee shall be two hundred and 
twenty-five dollars ($225) per acre of which twenty-five (25) percent is payable on submission of a 
preliminary site plan. The remainder of the filing fee is payable on submission of a definitive site 
plan. 

b. PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL: 

(1) GENERAL: A preliminary site plan of the entire proposed development properly drawn and con- 
forming to the requirements herewith set forth, shall be filed with the Planning Board at a regularb 
scheduled meeting, and twenty-five (25) percent of the filing fee. 

(2) PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN: The applicant shall provide the Planning Board with an original plus 
two (2) copies of the Preliminary Site Plan drawn at a scale of one (1) inch equals forty (40) feet. 
The plan shall be designated as a "Preliminary Site Plan", and shall form a clear basis for discus- 
sion of the details of the PRA, and for preparation of the Definitive Site Plan, the plan shall 



106 



Article 20 (continued) 

contain at a minimum, all of the requirements for a "Preliminary Plan" as specified in the Town of 
Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. In addition, the "Preliminary Site Plan" shall include 
the proposed location of residential buildings and accessory buildings. 

(3) SUPPORTING MATERIAL - Additional material to clarify and facilitate the interpretation of the 
plans shall be submitted to the Planning Board in written form when submitting the Preliminary Site 
Plan. 

c. REVIEW BY OTHER TOWN OFFICIALS: The applicant shall transmit copies of the Preliminary Site Plan 
within one (1) week to the following Town Officials: 

(1) One (1) copy each to the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Town Engineer, Water and Sewer 
Commission, Fire Department, Police Department, Building Inspector and Superintendent of Schools. 
Failure to do so may result in Planning Board rejection of the Preliminary Site Plan. 

(2) Written statements shall be required from the above officials to the Planning Board within thirty 
(30) days after receipt of the Preliminary Site Plan. In each of the above cases the Planning Board will 
assume that the respective officials have no comment if no report is received in thirty (30) days. 

d. PLANNING BOARD DUTIES: 

(1) The Planning Board shall give such Preliminary Site Plan approval, approval with conditions or 
disapproval within forty-five (45) days from submission of such plan. In the event of disapproval, the 
Planning Board shall state in writing the reason(s) for its disapproval. 

8. APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR SPECIAL PERMIT AND DEFINITIVE SITE PLAN: 

a. FILING FEE: All expenses for advertising, engineering, professional planning review, plans , inspect ion, 
construction, recording and filing of documents and all other expenses in connection with a PRA shall be 
borne by the applicant and are not refundable. The filing fee shall be two hundred and twenty-five 
dollars ($225) per acre of which seventy-five (75) percent is payable on submission of the Special 
Permit Application and Definitive Site Plan. 

b. application for special permit and definitive site plan approval: 

(1) GENERAL: A Special Permit Application for a definitive site plan of the entire proposed develop- 
ment, properly drawn and conforming to the requirements herewith set forth, shall be filed with the Plan- 
ning Board at a regularly scheduled meeting, and seventy- five (75) percent of the filing fee. 

(2) SPECIAL PERMIT AND DEFINITIVE SITE PLAN: An application for a Special Permit to develop a PRA 
must be filed with the Planning Board, and a duplicate with the Town Clerk, at the time when the Defin- 
itive Site Plan is submitted. The Definitive Site Plan shall contain, at a minimum, all the require- 
ments for a "Definitive Plan" as specified in the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 
In addition, the "Definitive Site Plan" shall include the proposed location of residential buildings 
and accessory buildings. 

(3) SUPPORTING MATERIAL: Additional material to clarify and facilitate the interpretation of the 
plans shall be submitted to the Planning Board in Written form when submitting the Definitive Site Plan. 

(4) DESIGN REQUIREMENTS: The Definitive Site Plan shall incorporate all the requirements for site 
improvement as specified in the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations and in Section IV- 
3.G of the Zoning By-Law. 

c. REVIEW BY OTHER TOWN OFFICIALS: The review procedure by other Town Officials shall be the same 
procedure as set forth in Section 7.c. of this By-Law. 

d. PLANNING BOARD DUTIES: 

(1) The Planning Board shall hold a public hearing within sixty-five (65) days of the filing of the 
Special Permit Application and Definitive Site Plan. Notice of the Public Hearing shall be as set forth 
in Section 9 Chapter 40A G.L. 

(2) The Planning Board shall give such Definitive Site Plan approval, approval with conditions or 
disapproval within ninety (90) days following the public hearing. The Planning Board, where necessary 
to preserve the public health, safety and welfare, may impose further restrictions upon the site, or 
parts thereof, as conditions to the granting of the Special Permit. If the Planning Board determines 
that all the requirements of this By-Law have been met, it shall grant a Special Permit. In the event 
of disapproval the Planning Board shall state in writing the reason(s) for its disapproval. 

(3) If the Planning Board fails to act upon a Special Permit application for the PRA or fails to 
notify the Town Clerk and the person submitting the PRA application of its action within ninety (90) 
days following the public hearing, it shall be deemed approved by the Planning Board. 

e. RECORDING: The applicant shall cause to be recorded with an outline survey of the site, the approved 
Special Permit and all other legal documents which have become a part of the permit. 

f. PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE: The improvements shown on the approved Definite Site Plan and incorporated 
in the approved Special Permit shall be guaranteed by the developer in the same manner as specified in 
the Town of Wilmington Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 



107 



Article 20 (continued) 
9. OTHER REQUIREMENTS: 

a. SUBDIVISION OF LAND: No lot shown on a plan for which a special permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided and a notation to that effect shall be endorsed upon the plan. 

b. BOARD OF APPEALS PROCEDURE: The Board of Appeals procedure shall be as provided for in the 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington. and by amending the Wilmington Zoning By-Law in the 
following manner: 

SECTION I -2. A. ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF DISTRICTS 

Delete: A. for the purpose of this by-law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into the folio* 



districts . 




1 . 


Rural Districts 


(R) 


2. 


Single-Residence-A Districts 


(SRA) 


3. 


Single-Residence-B Districts 


(SRB) 


4. 


Neighborhood Business Districts 


(NB) 


5. 


General Business Districts 


(GB) 


6. 


Industrial Districts 


(IND) 


7. 


High Density Traffic Business Districts 


(HDTB) 


8. 


Flood Plain Districts 


(W) 


and 


substitute: A. For the purpose of this by- 


law, the Town of Wilmington is hereby divided into 


the 


following districts. 




1. 


Rural Districts 


(R) 


2. 


Single-Residence-A Districts 


(SRA) 


3. 


Single-Residence-B Districts 


(SRB) 


4. 


Planned Residential Apartment Districts 


(PRA) 


5. 


Neighborhood Business Districts 


(NB) 


6. 


General Business Districts 


(GB) 


7. 


Industrial Districts 


(IND) 


8. 


High Density Traffic Business Districts 


(HDTB) 


9. 


Flood Plain Districts 


(W) 


IN I 


-3 LOTS IN MORE THAN ONE DISTRICT 




Add 


: "Except in a Planned Residential Apartment 


District," .... 



SECTION IV- 3. A. OFF-STREET PARKING 

Add: "Except in a Planned Residential Apartment District," .... 
SECTION IV-4. SCREENING OF OPEN USES 

Delete the words: (a Single-Residence-A or Single-Residence-B District.) 

and substitute: " a Single-Residence-A District, Single Residence-B District or a Planned 
Residential Apartment District." 
SECTION V, Subsection V-l. SCHEDULE OF REQUIREMENTS 

To add under the caption "HEIGHT, AREA AND YARD REGULATIONS" the following new schedule of require- 
ments : .... 

1. Under the heading (District) below (Single-Residence-B District) the words: "Planned Residents 
Apartment District (PRA)"; 

2. Under all of the remaining headings, the words... "As allowed in Section III-l.D". 
SECTION VTII-2.B. Permit Applications 

Add in the final paragraph, following (authorized by) and before (the) the following: .... "the 

Planning Board for uses under Section III-l.D, and".... 
SECTION VIII-4.B.1. Powers 

Add a new subparagraph as follows: "b . Appeals from decisions of the Planning Board in Planned 

Residential Apartment Districts". 
SECTION VIII -4. B. 2. Powers 

Add a new subparagraph as follows: "e. Permits for Planned Residential Apartment Districts as 

provided in section III-l.D; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Wilmington Housing Authority. Finance Committee recommends approval. 

Motion by Barbara Larson of the Wilmington Housing Authority: "I move that the Town vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington to create Planned Residential Apartment Districts for municipal 
use only for the purpose of permitting and regulating the construction of Planned Residential Apartments 
by adding a new section to the Wilmington Zoning By-Law as follows: Same as main article. Second motion 
by Barbara Larson: "I move to amend the main motion submitted pursuant to Article 20, by adding to clause 
"6. Development Standards" the following additional sub -paragraph. 

m. CONNECTION TO PUBLIC SEWER MAIN 
Every Planned Residential Apartment, and every apartment residential unit located therein shall be 
served by and be connected to a public sanitary sewer main of the Town of Wilmington." 



108 



Article 20 (continued) 

The Moderator interrupted at this point asked if the motion with these exceptions was the same? Being 
the same he suggested that she do away with any further reading. After some discussion the Article as 
amended was voted and lost, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to transfer Town-owned land off West Street to the care, custody, 
management and control of the Wilmington Housing Authority, said land to be used for housing purposes, 
being bound and described as follows: 

Westerly by Lot A2, Al , Map 71 

Parcel 13 and Map 71 Parcel 12 

in 4 courses 100.40, 606.45, 135 & 165 feet 

Northerly by Map 71 Parcel 1 400 feet 

Easterly by the Reading Line 930 feet 

Southerly by Land of N. or F. Loring 160 feet 

or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Wilmington Housing Authority. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. 

Motion by Barbara Larson: "I move that we pass over this article. Motion seconded and so voted. Article 
passed over. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District and Industrial District to Planned Residential Apartment 
District the following: 

The land in Wilmington situated on the Easterly side of West Street, bound and described as follows: 
Westerly by West Street 

in three courses 95.00,119.00 & 53.25 feet 

Northerly by Lot Al 623.68 feet 

Westerly by Lot Al, Map 71 
Parcel 13 and Map 71 Parcel 12 
in 3 courses 

105.74,135 & 165 feet 

Northerly by Map 71 Parcel 1 400 feet 

Easterly by the Reading Line 930 feet 

Southerly, Southerly, Easterly and Southerly by Land of N. or F. Loring 

in 4 courses 160,189.25 ,98.00 & 174.00 feet 

or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Wilmington Housing Authority. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion by Barbara 
Larson: "I would like to withdraw this article. Motion so voted. Article withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District and Industrial District to Planned Residential Apart- 
ment District the following: 

The land in Wilmington situated on the Easterly side of West Street, bound and described as follows: 

Westerly by West Street 

in three courses 95.00,119.00 & 53.25 feet 

Northerly by Lot Al 623.68 feet 

Easterly by Land of N. or F. 

Lehan in 2 courses 500.71 & 100.40 feet 

Southerly, Easterly and Southerly 
by land of N. or F. Loring 

in three courses 189.25,98.00 & 174.00 feet 

or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Wilmington Housing Authority. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion by Barbara 
Larson: "I would like to withdraw this article." Motion so voted. Article withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000 for the purpose of 
designing and constructing approximately 2,100 feet of sidewalk on Nichols Street provided that all the 
property owners on the west side of Nichols Street sign releases for the sidewalk location; or do any- 
thing else in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. Article by petition. 

Mr. James Banda: "I make a motion to pass over this article." So voted unanimously. 



109 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the town will vote to accept Ainsworth Road as a public town way, as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board, according to a plan filed with the office of 
the Town Clerk, or any better approved plan, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to receive as a 
GIFT such land as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article. 

Money to be raised by assessment to the abuttors with provision of Chapter 80 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts with Reference to betterments. Article by petition. 

Mr. Aldo Caira: "I move that this article be passed over." Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to REZONE FROM SINGLE RESIDENCE A DISTRICT TO GENERAL BUSINESS DISTRICT the following described 
premises : 

The land in Wilmington situated on the Southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: 
Northerly by Lowell Street, 
Westerly by West Street, 

Southerly by existing industrial district, 
and Easterly by Route 93: 
or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. 

Motion by Mr. Aldo Caira: "I move that this article be passed over." Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington by voting to rezone from General Business and Industrial District to High Density Traffic 
Business District, the following described parcels of land to wit: 

A certain parcel of land located in Wilmington, Mass., Middlesex County, with the buildings thereon 
situated on the westerly side of Main Street and shown as Lot A on Plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilming- 
ton, Massachusetts, owned by Willie B. Mcintosh, dated January 5, 1945, made by Dana F. Perkins, Civil 
Engineer and Surveyor" recorded with the Middlesex North District Deeds, Book of Plans 77, Plan 4, bounded 
and described as follows: 

EASTERLY ON Main Street, 100 feet; 

SOUTHERLY on land now or formerly of Willie B. Mcintosh shown as LOT B on said Plan, 215.34 feet; 
WESTERLY on land now or formerly of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 100 feet; 

NORTHERLY on land now or formerly of John R. Mcintosh, 211.71 feet to the point of beginning. 
CONTAINING 21,350 square feet of land. 

BEING the same premises conveyed to the Grantor by Deed of Oil Service Company of New England dated 
July 28, 1965 and recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 1708, Page 274. 

A certain parcel of land in Wilmington in the County of Middlesex, being shown as Lot 1-B on a plan 
entitled "Sub-division Plan of Land, Wilmington, Mass., owned by A.B. Sweezey, Inc." November 1976, 
William G. Troy & Associates, Registered Land Surveyors, to be recorded herewith, and being further bound- 
ed and described as follows: 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Main Street, fifty (50) feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Lot 1-A, Two hundred seventeen and 16/100 (217.16) feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Charles W. & Ruth Doucette, two hundred fifteen and 34/100 
(215.34) feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY by land of Boston & Maine, fifty (50) feet. 
CONTAINING about 10,810 square feet. 

For my title reference see Deed from Walter C. LaDow et ux, dated October 11, 1954, recorded with 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 1272, Page 99. 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. 

Motion by Mr. Charles Doucette: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of 
the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from General Business and Industrial District to High Density 
Traffic Business District, the following described parcel of land to wit; 

The article being the same as the printed article the further reading of same was not necessary. The 
Finance Committee reconsidered their decision and were favorable. 

After very little discussion the vote was taken. 2/3rds vote being required, a standing vote was taken. 
Vote was 262 Yes and 20 No. Motion so voted. 



110 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Larz Neilson 
a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as part of Parcel 8A on Assessors' Map 89, containing 5902 
square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the 
minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends approval, unanimously voted. Motion by Mr. Larz 
Neilson: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Larz Neilson a 
certain parcel of Town owned land shown as part of Parcel 8A on Assessors" Map 89, containing 5902 squan 
feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimui 
amount to be paid for such conveyance. 

Second motion by Mr. Neilson: "I move that we amend Article 28 to read $3,790.00. The first motion was 
voted unanimously, after the numeration was added it was brought up for reconsideration and again voted 
unanimously. Amount voted $3,790.00. Second motion seconded and so voted. 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the selectmen to sell and convey to Catherine R. 
Jackson, 4 Reading Avenue, Wilmington, a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 76 on Assessors 
Map 55, containing about 15,000 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may 
determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. This article was withdrawn 
when the petitioner was made aware of the amount of the purchase. Mr. Morris moved to amend the article 
to read purchase price of $9,000. The request to withdraw was so voted. Article withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Joseph P. 
Casey and Alice J. Casey a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 3 on Assessors' Map 64 
bound and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by land of Casey 704.58 feet 

Northeasterly by Federal Street 175.14 feet 

Southeasterly by land of Cuoco 262.09 feet 

Southwesterly by land of 

John'sSons Realty 524.20 feet (more or less) 

containing 113,706 square feet more or less, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may 
determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. 

Motion by Mr. Joseph Casey: "I move that the Town vote to sell and convey to Joseph P. Casey and Alice 
J. Casey a certain parcel of land as described in Article 30. A price of $11,000 was placed on the 
land. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 202 No 61. Voted by 2/3rds vote. 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Joseph A. and 

Joan S. Berardi a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 100 on Assessors Map 44, subject to 

such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further to set the minimum amount to be paid 
for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 



Article by petition. Fiance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris: "I move that we pass over this article. Motion so voted and seconded by 
Aldo Caira. Article passed over. 



ARTICLE 32. The School Traffic Supervisors of Wilmington request that all Wilmington Traffic Supervisors 
be able to participate in the retirement system which they enjoyed before 1975; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. Motion was made and 
seconded to pass over this article. Motion so voted. 



ARTICLE 33. Move that the town vote, that within the rights, duties and obligations of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapters 70, 71 and Chapter 41 Sections 59 and 60, the School Committee, School Superinten- 
dent and other school administrators authorized by law to expend money shall, in addition to providing 
their budget as required by those Chapters, also furnish to the Town Manager two alternative budgets 
(inclusive of special articles, if any) for fiscal year 1980 and 1981, each of which is 107 o and 5%, 



111 



Article 33 (continued) 

respectively, below that voted for fiscal year 1979-1980. And that the town manager shall furnish thes* 
alternative budgets to the Selectmen and Advisory Committee. These alternative budgets and appropria- 
tions shall be printed on and distributed with any documents distributed pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 41 Section 60, the Town Charter and By-Laws. 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. Motion by John Murphy: 
"I move that the Town vote, motion read the same as the printed article." After much discussion the 
motion was defeated. 



ARTICLE 34. Move that ":he town vote, that in addition to the rights, duties and obligations of Massachu 
setts General Laws Chapter 41 Sections 59 and 60, the Selectmen and all boards, committees, heads of 
departments or other officers of the town authorized by law to expend money shall also furnish to the 
Town Manager an alternative of budgets and special articles for fiscal year 1980-1981 the total of which 
is at least 107o below that voted for fiscal year 1979-1980. And that the Town Manager shall furnish thi 
alternative to the Selectmen and Advisory Committee. These alternative budgets and appropriations shall 
be printed on and distributed with any documents distributed pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 41 Section 60, and the Town Charter and By-Laws. 

Article by petition. Finance Committee recommends disapproval, unanimously. Motion by John Murphy, 
same as above. Motion was defeated. 



With no further motions to come before the meeting the Moderator asked for a motion to adjourn. 

Sterling Morris and seconded by Aldo Caira. Motion so voted and the meeting adjourned at 10:30 

There were 421 voters in attendance at the Monday evening meeting. 

ARTICLES BY TAXATION $14,574,223. 

REVENUE SHARING 560,000. 

TRANSFER 673,290. 

BOND ISSUE $ 95,550 



phy, 

Motion 1 
P.M. 



Attest : 



Priscilla R. Ward 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



WARRANT SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 24, 1979 
TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised 
By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified 
to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Barrows Auditorium in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Monday evening, the 24th day of September A.D. 1979 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the follow- 
ing articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate an additional sum of money for the 
purpose of constructing and equipping a water treatment plant as previously authorized under Article 12 
at the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting held on March 11, 1978 and to determine how the appropriation shall 
be raised, by borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. (Request of the Water & Sewer 
Commission) 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof with your doings thereon 
to the Town Clerk as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this tenth day of September A.D. 1979. 

Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington 
s/Rocco V. DePasquale, Chairman 
s /James F. Banda 
s/Aldo A. Caira 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

Attest: s/Robert J. Cain 

112 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 24, 1979 - BARROWS AUDITORIUM 



On September 24, 1979 at 8:30 P.M. at the Barrows Auditorium, in the High School, the Moderator declared 
that a quorum being present the Special Town Meeting was open for the transaction of any business to be 
brought before it. 

The Moderator John Callan read the Warrant as posted and recognized George R. Allan, Water Commissioner. 
Motion by Mr. Allan: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the additional sum of 
$600,000.00 for the purpose of constructing and equipping a water treatment plant as previously 
authorized under Article 12 at the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting held on March 11, 1978, and that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow a sum not to exceed 
$600,000.00 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 4 of the General Laws as amended and 
supplemented, and issue the bonds or notes of the Town therefor, at one time or from time to time, each 
issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 20 years from its date, and that the Board 
of Water and Sewer Commissioners be, and they hereby are, authorized to accept, allocate and expend any 
funds that may be received for this purpose from the Federal or State Government under any grant program, 
as a contribution toward the cost of the project, in lieu of the sum appropriated hereby, or any part 



After some discussion of the matter and a short recitation from a member of the local Carpenters Union 
about the company being awarded the bid for the treatment plant, the Moderator asked for a standing vote. 
Finance Committee recommended approval, unanimously. The vote was Yes 161 and No 1. Motion was so 
voted . 

The Moderator declared there being no further business to come before the meeting that said meeting be 
adjourned. The meeting was declared adjourned at 8:55 P.M. There were 176 voters in attendance. 
Article voted by Bond Issue $600,000.00. 

Attest: Priscilla R. Ward 



thereof. 



ii 



Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 




George Allan, Chairman, Water & Sewer Commission Presenting Case for Water Treatment Plant 



113 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
July 1, 1978 to June 30, 1979 



Balance as of July 1, 1978 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/78 to 6/30/79 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/78 to 6/30/79 
Balance on Hand 6/30/79 



2,322,919.72 
35,347,325.44 
37,670,245.16 
36,066,133.67 

1,604,111.49 



Tax Collections: 

Personal Property, Levy 



Real Estate, Levy 



Betterments Added to Taxes: 
Water Assessments, Levy 
Street Assessments, 
Water Assessments, 
Water Assessments, 
Street Assessments, 
Sewer Assessments, 

Water Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy 



Sewer Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy 

Tax Titles & Possessions: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Possessions 
Pro-Forms Taxes 
Assessments Paid in Advance: 

Water 

Street 

Sewer 



1976 
1978 
1979 
1974 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 

1977 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1979 

1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

1979 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 

768.00 
5,569.00 
305,450.51 
75.22 
53,921.95 
196,524.26 
10,828,232.23 
1,119.43 

519.71 
467.39 
1,836.24 
11,612.15 
9,981.61 
5,794.52 

48.14 
947.95 
1,262.86 
26,748.17 



37,802.00 
30,590.00 



311,787.51 



11,079,873.09 



1,471.85 
3,237.61 
8,547.60 



30,211.62 

29,007.12 
1,292.13 



68,392.00 
390.82 



13,257.06 



11,534,211.35 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



Short Term Loans: 

Temporary Loans, Antic, of Revenue 

, Antic, of Bond Issue 



2,750,000.00 
110,000.00 



2,860,000.00 



114 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Aid: 
Schools : 

Special Workshops 

Public Law #94-482 

Handicapped Children 

Reading Skills 

Business Education Program 

Learning Resources 

Head Start 1980 
Antirecession Fiscal Funds 
Interlibrary Loan Improvement Project 
Sewer Grant Reimbursement 
State Aid: 
Schools : 

Arts & Humanities 
Public Libraries 

Highway & Transit Develop. Assist. 
C.E.T.A. Funds 



School Lunch Program: 

State Reimbursements 

Program Receipts 
High School Athletic Association 
Recreation Dedicated Accounts 
Outside Detail Account 
Tax Title Recordings 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department: 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Industrial Way Pumping Station 

Water Department Refunds 

Water Available Surplus 
Sewer Use (Septage Disposal) 
Veterans' Aid Reimbursements 
Memorial Library Gifts 
Carter Lecture Fund, Reimbursements 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Perpetual Care Funds 
Tailings Account 

Fire Insurance Reimbursements Restricted 

Glen Road School Use 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield Dividend 
Sale of Town Owned Land 
Appropriation Refunds 
Surplus Revenue (Refunds-prior years) 

Short Term Investments 
Employee Deductions: 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance 



7,465.00 
22,512.00 
64,170.00 
83,650.00 
605.85 
10,936.18 
14,662.00 



204,001.03 
16,549.83 
200.00 
694,700.00 



1,100.00 
6,621.00 
86,464.00 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



94,185.00 
4,118.67 



1,013,754.53 



206,261.94 
235,888.62 



442,150.56 
10,133.75 
23,307.30 
46,956.49 
247.52 



522,795.62 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



617,095.06 
3,713.98 
435.56 
10,383.61 
8,921.63 
364.11 
82.62 



for 



4,676.75 



640,996.57 
7,500.00 
2,189.50 
89.94 
589.02 
9,032.00 
8,720.00 
2,469.31 

33,796.00 
11,336.00 

100.00 
24,722.31 

226.00 



746,443.40 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



1,571,543.75 
466,713.07 
480,733.53 
155,617.56 
2,464.28 
6,370.60 



11,270,877.60 



115 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 
(continued) 

Employee Deductions: (cont.) 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 74,962.97 

Credit Union 744,798.00 

U. S. Savings Bonds 19,023.75 

Union Dues 56,277.45 

Court Ordered Deductions 2,150.00 3,580,654.96 

Fish & Game Licenses for Commonwealth 8,367.40 

County Dog Licenses 4,413.95 

Lunch Food Tax, State 760.82 3,594,197.13 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Schools, State Reimbursements 2,136,582.21 

Real Estate Abatements, Veterans, State 10,258.05 

, Blind, State 787.50 

, Widows, State 9,625.00 

, Elderly, State 30,118.64 

Loss of Taxes, State 890.79 

Lottery Funds, State 46,446.00 

Local Aid Fund, State 210,889.52 

Highway Gas Fund, State 41,560.00 

Regional Vocational School Reimbursement, State 31,772.00 

Historical Commission, State 966.69 

Conservation Commission, State 3,900.00 

Veterans Benefits Reimbursement, State 12,239.89 2,536,036.29 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 



Prior Levies 427,945.77 

Current Levies 431,834.26 859,780.03 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes 132.10 

Ambulance Account 4,422.33 

Sewer Rates 79,320.27 

Liquor Licenses 7,300.00 
Interests & Costs: 



Short Term Investments 70,795.30 

Tax Collections 41,468.13 

Water Demands 4,725.34 

General Fund Investments 79,242.22 

Tax Titles Interests & Costs 6,268.12 202,499.11 
Municipal Receipts: 

Selectmen 1,135.50 

Tax Collector 5,711.50 

Town Clerk 7,454.03 

Planning Board 45.25 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Commissions 454. 76 14,801.04 

Police Department 4,711.00 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 24,425.50 

Wire Permits 3,918.75 

Plumbing Permits 828.00 

Gas Permits 774.00 

Certification Fees 50.00 29,996.25 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 658.00 

Engineering Department 430.00 

Cemetery Department 9,937.00 

Drainlayer Permits 100.00 

Advertising Fees 12.25 

Director of Standards 72.00 
Health & Sanitation: 



Board of Health 4,184.06 

Public Health Nurse 282.50 

Sale of Dogs 213.00 

Dog License Reimbusements 2 , 859 . 71 7,539.27 



116 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
(continued) 

Library Receipts 
Conservation Commission 

Insurance & Workmens Comp . Reimbursements 
Witness Fee, Probate Court 
Court Fines 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1978 to JUNE 30, 1979 $35,347,325.44 



1,233.48 
425.00 
6,791.79 
6.00 

38,842.60 3,805,045.81 



ANALYSIS OF THE ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1979 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL 1978 RECEIPTS 



Used by the 

Assessors in Actual More Less 

Setting 1979 Receipts Than Than 

Tax Rate 1978 Estimated Estimated 



Motor Vehicles & Trailer Excise 


651,486 


00 


680,443 


92 


28,957. 


92 






Licenses 


8,000 


00 


7,200 


00 






800 


00 


Fines 


4,264. 


00 


14,446 


75 


10,182. 


75 






Special Assessments 


25,301 


00 


27,837 


80 


2,536. 


80 






General Government 


11,909 


00 


15,097 


00 


3,188 


00 






Protection of Persons & Property 


39,664 


00 


18,404 


55 






21,259 


45 


Health & Sanitation 


3,135 


00 


4,847 


56 


1,712 


56 






Highways 


910 


00 


521 


00 






389 


00 


Libraries, Local Receipts 


896 


00 


1,185 


59 


289 


59 






Cemeteries (Other than Trust Funds & Sale of Lots) 


10,112 


00 


9,475 


00 






637 


00 


Interest 


121,456 


00 


239,416 


26 


117,960 


26 






Farm Animal Excise 


153 


00 


315 


35 


162 


35 






Ambulance Services 


4,847 


00 


4,771 


80 






75 


20 


Sewer Revenue 


72,228 


00 


72,842 


03 


614 


03 






Dog License Reimbursements 


3,061 


00 


2,608 


00 






453 


00 


Miscellaneous Receipts 


6,326 


00 


2,712 


08 






3,613 


92 


Regional Vocational School 


63,359 


00 


31,772 


00 






31,587 


00 




1,027,107 


00 


1,133,896 


69 


165,604 


26 


58,814 


57 



117 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/78 - 6/30/79 



Refunds : 

Personal Property Taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tax Title Recording Fees 

Ambulance Account 

Tailings Account 

Sale of Lots, Cemetery 

Estimated Receipts 

Overlay Accounts (Interest) 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Services 

Industrial Way 

Water Liens, 1975 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Assessments - State & County: 

State Recreation 

M.D.C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Air Pollution Control 
Planning Council 
M.B.T.A. 

Ipswich River Watershed 
County Tax 
County Hospital 
County Retirement 
Legal Settlements 

Temporary Loans - Anticipation of Taxes 
Glen Acres Trust 
Corum Meadows Trust 
Outside Details: 

Police 

Fire 

Maintenance 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Employee Deductions: 

Withholding Taxes, Federal 
State 

Retirement 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

Credit Union 

Court Ordered Deductions 
Union Dues: 

Town Employees 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Maintenance Department 

Teachers 
Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 

State Fish & Game Licenses 

Lunch Food Tax 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 
School Lunch Program 



475.98 
10.00 
14.54 
114.40 
639.38 

89,282.12 
81,947.25 
2,484.75 
1,558.12 
2,560.12 
235,341.35 
1,154.03 
247,253.69 
16,724.81 
305,520.00 



3,986.00 
3,852.46 
3,016.00 
4,032.00 
41,378.35 



5.65 
26,413.75 
12,145.26 
247.52 
45.00 
12.00 
50.00 
647.29 
17.69 



1,254.30 



414,327.74 



569,498.50 



36,184.25 
539.23 
9,935.26 
461.25 

1,571,543.75 
466,713.07 
476,030.38 
2,398.79 
6,413.42 
158,163.78 
72,921.83 
19,023.75 
744,798.00 
2,200.00 



56,264.81 

4,908.25 
8,362.65 
772.51 
23,294.69 
512,827.59 



40,838.46 



983,826.24 
15,700.00 
2,750,000.00 
16,210.74 
22.00 



47,119.99 



3,576,471.58 



118 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



High School Athletic Association 
C.E.T.A. 

Special Police Account 

Carter Lecture Fund 

Cemetery Trust Funds 

Library Memorial Account 
Federal Grants and Aid - School: 

Public Law 874 

Public Law 864 

Head Start 

Special Workshop 

Industrial Arts 

Library Extensions 

Arts & Humanities 

Title IVB 

Reading Skills 

Learning Resources 

Public Law 94-482 

Education of Handicapped 

Improving Ancilliary Skills 
Library Projects 
Short Term Investments 



5,487. 


63 


5,099. 


68 


605. 


85 


589. 


02 


8,320 


00 


14 


25 


31,403 


83 


16,120 


24 


14,662 


00 


12,591 


00 


29 


79 


92 


18 


1,000 


00 


71,955 


62 


82,427 


85 


1,085 


00 


5,038 


43 


10,600 


00 


2,295 


04 



570,282.12 



249,300.98 
466.45 
11,370,877.60 



Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



$19,621,116.16 



Balance on hand July 1, 1978 
Received 7/1/78 through 6/30/79 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING 
JULY 1, 1978 to JUNE 30, 1979 



Federal Grants 



$539,925.00 



Interest Received 
On Investments 



$9,873.15 



Expended 



$580,776.00 



Balance 
On Hand 

$57,476.58 



Balance on hand June 30, 1979 



$26,498.73 



Expenditures : 

Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 



$290,388.00 
290,388.00 
$580,776.00 



'I certify that this is a true extract 
of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Mass." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



119 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1979 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies 

Personal Property 



Real Estate Taxes 



Current Levies 

Personal Property 
Real Estate Taxes 
Tax Deferral & Recovery 



1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1973 
1977 
1978 

1979 
1979 



1978 
1979 



Personal Property in Litigation, Levy 1969 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
Prior Levies 
Levy 1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

Current Levy, 1979 
Farm Animal Excise Tax 1978 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes: 



Street Assessments 1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

Water Assessments 1978 
1979 

Unapportioned Water Betterments 
Sewer Betterments 
Sewer Betterments 1978 
1979 

Betterments in Litigation 
Street 1972 
1973 

Accounts Receivables: 



Water Department: 
Rates 
Services 

Commercial & Industrial Fire Protection 



Temporary Loans/Anticipation of State & 
County Aid to Highways - 
Paid in advance of Reimbursement 
Unprovided for Accounts: 
Overlay Deficits: 
Levy 1975 
1977 
1978 
1979 

Legal Settlements 
Underestimates - Assessments 

Ipswich River Watershed Assessment, 1979 
Due from School Lunch Program 
Outside Detail Account 
Court Ordered Deductions 
Loans Authorized 
Revenue, 1980 

TOTAL ASSETS 



15.60 
135.70 
32.45 
67.80 
499.20 
,267.85 
,098.06 



175.90 
49.82 
124,080.71 

104,029.43 
277,995.59 
1,628.00 
1,607.65 
462.00 



11.55 
1,322.05 
4,035.77 
9,452.99 
12,438.54 
19,544.42 
34,895.93 
56,046.04 



95.96 
93.76 
91.52 
561.79 
531.21 
423.56 
1,010.17 



12,090 


86 


30,374 


97 


6,377 


95 


6,226 


07 


85 


61 


98 


20 



350.00 
737.51 
23,118.67 
363,160.48 



29,074.44 
163.50 
50.00 



1,604,111.49 
1,100,000.00 
625.00 



3,116.66 
124,306.43 
382,025.02 

3,697.65 



137,747.29 
269,129.34 



112,635.46 
78,457.73 



1,374.24 
1,433.73 
42,465.83 
12,604.02 

183.81 



37,127.12 
2,869.04 
144.00 



Industrial Way Pumping Station 






2,683 


82 


Water Liens, 1978 


1,516 


08 






1979 


3,319 


63 


4,835 


71 


Sever Rates 


3,368 


11 






Sewer Use 


2,500 


00 


5,868 


11 


State Aid to Highways 


99,904 


28 






County Aid to Highways 


3,071 


41 


102,975 


69 


Ambulance Account 


16,435 


82 






Veterans Benefits 


8,987 


08 


25,422 


90 



387,366.66 
15,250.00 

1,109.12 



29,287.94 



2,704,736.49 



513,145.76 



406,876.63 
119.50 



191,093.19 



58,061.63 



231,926.39 



4,427.92 



433,013.72 
8,077,550.00 
14,573,103.57 

$27,194,054.80 



120 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1979 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

1974 Real Estate Tax, Overpaid 

1975 Real Estate Tax, Overpaid 

1976 Real Estate Tax, Overpaid 122.03 255.36 
Tax Title Recording Fee 5.00 
1976 Water Betterment, Overpaid 1.00 

1976 Water Liens, Overpaid 

1977 Water Liens, Overpaid 126. 31 126.51 
Water Guaranteed Deposits 210.00 
Employee Payroll Deductions: 

Retirement System 
Group Insurance 
Washington National Insurance 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Union Dues 12.64 109,209.31 

Agency Accounts: 



County Dog Licenses 

State Food Tax 51.65 884.45 



Revolving Accounts: 

Recreation Dedicated Account 

High School Athletic Account 17,570.97 21,020.25 

Federal Grants & Aids: 





uo 




9 S 


1 99 


n i 
< > _> 




20 


1 ZD 


Jl 


7 A C\ 9 9 


Q 1 


500 


54 


1,393 


35 


18,660 


65 


14,619 


20 


12 


64 


832 


80 


51 


65 


3,449 


28 


17,570.97 


27,555 


93 


94,478 


80 


867 


00 


5,526 


07 


14,662 


00 


2,320 


25 


3,686 


32 


4 


87 


30 


59 


10,936 


18 


209 


50 


100 


00 


6,828 


00 


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69 



Public Law #874 

#85/864 
Occupational Education 
Special Education VI (202-203-204) 
Head Start 1980 

Occupational Education/Molding Projects 

/Exploring Ind. Arts 
Law Collection Development Project 
Interlibrary Loan Improvement Project 
Learning Resources IV-B 

CETA Funds 160,277.51 
Arts & Humanities (Library) 
State Aid to Libraries 

Library Memorial Fund 75.69 7,003.69 

Tailings Account 7,704.86 

Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 10,102.08 

Group Insurance/Blue Cross, Dividend 11,526.00 

Corum Meadows Trust 8,004.88 

Sale of Town-owned Land 100.00 

Temporary Loans/Antic, of Bond Issue 352,000.00 

Cemetery Trust Funds 500.00 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 8,881.80 
Fire Insurance Reimbursement/Available for 

Appropriations - Glen Road School 33,796.00 
Overestimates, State & County Assessments: 

County Tax, 1979 36,403.79 

County Hospital Assessment, 1979 3,490.16 

State Recreation Assessment, 1979 3,626.54 

M.D.C. Sewer Assessment, 1979 5,727.90 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Assessment, 1979 90.25 

M.B.T.A. Assessment, 1979 2,658.65 51,997.29 
Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 



Farm Animal Excise 119.50 
Motor Vehicle Excise 406,876,63 
Special Assessments 57,876.82 
Tax Titles & Possessions 191,093.19 
Departmental Revenue 25,422.90 
Water Revenue 97,533.18 
Sewer Revenue 5,868.11 
State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 102,975.69 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 625.00 

Special Tax Revenue 645.81 889,036.83 
Appropriation Balances Reserved for Encumberances , 1979 394,971.19 
Appropriation Balances Reserved for Capital Projects, 1979 289,272.84 
Construction Accounts Carried Forward to 1980 793,153.81 
Loans Authorized and Unissued 7,725,550.00 
Appropriation Control, 1980 15,247,513.00 
Water Available Surplus 289,598.16 
Surplus Revenue 781,352.98 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES $27,194,054.80 



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128 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 



liilmington Memorial Library 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $485,000 
Land Acq. Town Forest (1975) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $169,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $275,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $264,000 
iirban Renewal Bonds (1971) 

G/L 212B, Sec. 20 $200,000 
Street Construction Bonds (1974/75) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $68,210 
Sewerage System & Treatment Facility 

G/L 44, Sec. 7 $1,865,000 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 



Soutwell Street School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000 
North Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,050,000 
Itaburn Street School 

Acts 645/48, $597,000 
Woburn Street School Addition 

Acts 645/48, $660,000 
West Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,445,000 
Shawsheen Avenue School 

Acts 645/48, $1,674,720 
Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 

Acts 645/48, $100,000 
ater Main Bonds, New Well Field 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529 
Salem Street Well Field & Mains 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $320,000 
Water Main Bonds (1974/75) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $11,940 
Improv. System N.E. Sector Town 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $550,000 



COMBINED TOTALS 



Balances 
7/1/78 



235,000 
125,000 
170,000 
185,000 
80,000 
27,284 
1,865,000 
2,687,284 



Added 
1979 



40,000 
165,000 
172,000 
275,000 
485,000 
660,000 
35,000 
90,000 
140,000 
4,776 
395,000 
2,461,776 
5,149,060 



Paid-Off 
1978/79 



25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 
13,642 
100,000 
208,642 



20,000 
55,000 
30,000 
35,000 
70,000 
110,000 
5,000 
30,000 
20,000 
2,388 
35,000 
412,388 
621,030 



Balances 
6/30/79 



210,000 
105,000 
155,000 
170,000 
60,000 
13,642 
1,765,000 
2,478,642 



20,000 
110,000 
142,000 
240,000 
415,000 
550,000 
30,000 
60,000 
120,000 
2,388 
360,000 
2,049,388 
4,528,030 



129 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS 6/30/79 



Balances 
6/30/78 



Withdrawn 
1978/79 



Interest 
Added 



Trusts 
Added 



Balances 
6/30/78 



Princ 
Hel u 
Trul 



Cemetery Trust Funds 
Andover Savings Bank 
Reading Cooperative Bank 
Reading Savings Bank 



3,369.26 
50,585.32 
22,784.71 



253.00 
3,569.66 
1,671.75 



8,320.00 



3,622.26 
62,474.98 
24,456.46 



2,1754 1 
52,595. 
20,400. 1 



S.D.J. Carter Lecture Fund 

Reading Savings Bank 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 

Burnap Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Benjamin Buck Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 



5,091.96 
3,345.01 



413.76 



740.16 



564.65 



589.02 



373.98 
198.55 



34.33 



48.57 



41.2* 



5,465.94 
2,954.54 



448.09 



788.73 



605.93 



4,578. 
2.000. 



200. 



500. 



Sears Cook Walker-Walker 

School Fund 

Reading Savings Bank 

Chester M. Clark Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 

Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

East Wilmington Improvement 
Association Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 



Conservation Commission 
Reading Savings Bank 



361.44 



565.26 



385.33 



19.75 



41.31 



31.97 



381.19 



606.57 



417.30 



257. 



4,780. 


98 






341. 


16 




5,122. 


14 


3,820. 


92,987. 


84 


589. 


02 


6,625. 


31 


8,320.00 


107,344 


13 


87 , 7254 


1 


2,291 


87 






125. 


26 




2,417 


13 


1,49?! 


95,279 


.71 


589. 


02 


6,750. 


57 


8,320.00 


109,761 


26 


89,221 





130 



FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 Boutwell School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd. School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Intermediate 

School 

43 West School 

44 Swain School 

46 Walker School 

47 West Intermediate School 

48 West School 

49 Shawsheen School 
51 Whitefield School 
53Wildwood School 

54 Woburn Street School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Main & Middlesex Ave. 

1222 Carr Fastener 

1223 Wilmington Builders 

123 Main & Clark Sts. 

124 Washington Ave. 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Main St. & Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave. & Wiser St. 

128 Baker St . & Taplin Ave. 

129 Phillips Ave. & Wiser St. 

131 Hobson Ave. & Miles St. 

132 Main St. & 

Massachusetts Ave. 

133 Massachusetts Ave. & 

River St. 

134 Main & Harnden Sts. 

135 St. Dorothy's Church 

136 Veranda Ave. 

137 Main St. & Grove Ave. 

138 Grove & Wild Aves. 

139 Grove Ave. & Burnap St. 

141 Grove Ave. & Lake St. 

142 Main St. & Glen Rd. 

143 Main& Lake Sts. 

144 Lake St. & Warren Rd. 

146 Main& Davis Sts. 

147 Fairfield Ave. 

148 Marjorie Rd. 

149 Main St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

211 Burlington & Floradale 

Av6S. 

2111 Diamond Crystal Salt 

Company 

2112 Sweetheart Plastic Corp. 

212 Burlington Ave. & 

Harris St. 

21 3 Cedar St. & Burt Rd. 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave. & 

Chestnut St. 

216 Chestnut St. & 

Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St. & Mill Rd. 

218 Chestnut St. & 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St. near 

Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 

Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts. 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts. 

225 Marion St. to 
Chestnut St. 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. & 
Boutwell St. 

228 Boutwell St. & Taft Rd. 
229Taft & Swain Rds. 

231 Roosevelt Rd. 

232 Burlington Ave. & 
Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. & 
Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 

235 Burlington Ave. & 
* Forest St. 



236 Burlington Ave. at 

Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St. & 

Randolph Rd. 

239 Forest St. & 

Cochrane Rd. 

241 Elwood Rd. 

242 Forest St. & 

Edwards Rd. 

251 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Canal St. 

252 Canal St. & Burt Rd. 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave. & 

Dunton Rd. 

255 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St. 

257 Amherst Rd. 

258 Auburn Ave. 

259 Ferguson Rd. 

261 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Aldrich Rd. 

262 Aldrich Rd. & 

Hardin St. 

263 Aldrich Rd. & 

Kendall St. 

264 Aldrich Rd. & 

Boutwell St. 

265 Aldrich Rd. & Forest St. 

266 Winston Ave. 

267 Aldrich Rd. at 

Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave. near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Bond St. 

273 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Hopkins St. 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St. at 

Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Nichols St. 

278 Nichols St. & 

Fairmeadow Rd. 

279 Fairmeadow & 

Jere Rds. 

281 Nichols St. at 

Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 

Billerica Line 

311 Main St. & Dublin Ave. 

312 Main & Lowell Sts. 
3121 Hayden Mica Co. 

313 Main St. & Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 
3142 Brewsters 

315 Main & Eames Sts. 

316 Eames St. 

3132 Polyvinyl Chemical 

3161 J. W. Greer Co. 

3162 National Polychemical 

Co., Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 JBF Scientific, Jewell 

Drive 

3165 Harwich Chemical, 
Jewell Drive 

3166 Altron, Industrial & 

Progress Way 

317 Cook Ave. 

3171 Raffi & Swanson 

318 Main St. at Woburn Line 

321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 
321 1 Parker & Laurel Sts. 

322 Parker & Blackstone Sts. 
3223 Allen Park Drive 

3222 Allen Park & Sheldon Sts. 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 



3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 
3261 Stepan Chemical 

327 Woburn St. & 

Brentwood Ave. 

328 Woburn St. & 

Morse Ave. 

329 Woburn & Eames Sts. 

3291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 Jeffrey Chemical 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 

3295 Analog Devices 

331 Woburn St. & 

Industrial Way 

3313 Commodity Warehouse 

3314 Market Forge 

3315 Smithcraft 

3316 Crusader Paper Co. 
3318 Compugraphic 

332 Strout Ave. 

333 Lowell St. & 

Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts. 

335 West St. & Westdale 

Avenue 
336AyotteSt. & Crest 
Avenue 

337 Nickerson Ave. 

338 West. St. & 

Suncrest Ave. 

339 Suncrest Ave. & 

Meadow Lane 

341 West St. & Industrial Way 

3411 Compugraphic, 
90 Industrial Way 

3412 Compugraphics 

3413 Scully Signal 
3415 Compugraphic 
3417 ADS 

342 Lowell St., Rte. 93 

and Reading Line 

411 Church St., Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts. 

413 Church & Beacon Sts. 

414 Beacon St. & 

Belmont Ave. 

415 State St. & 

Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts. 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St. & 

Thurston Ave. 

419 Church & Adams Sts. 

421 Chandler & Kelley Rds. 

422 Adams St. Ext. 

423 Church St. & 

Middlesex Ave. 
4231 New Library 
4232 Baptist Church 

424 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adelaide St. 

425 Middlesex Ave. & 

Clark St. 

426 Clark St. & 

Railroad Ave. 

427 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adams St. 

428 St. Thomas' Church 
4281 Villanova Hall 

429 Middlesex Ave. & 

School St. 

431 School St. & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & Loumac Rd 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave. & 

Wildwood St. 

435 Wildwood St. near 

Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St. near 

Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood & Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd. 

511 Middlesex Ave. & 
Glen Rd. 



512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd. & 

Lawrence St. 

514 Lawrence St. & 

Lawrence Ct. 

515 Lawrence St. & 

Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd. at 

R.R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd. & King St. 

519 King St. & Garden 

Av6- 

521 King & KilbySts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. & Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 

Aves. 

528 Faulkner & Allston 

Aves. 

529 Jones Ave. 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave. & 

Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts. 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts. 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts. 

539 Federal & Library Sts. 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts. 

542 Woburn & West Sts. 

543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts. 
5461 Dymo Graphics Systems 

547 Concord St. at Rte. 93 

5471 Compugraphics, Concord 

St. 

5472 Dynamics Research 

5474 General Electric 

5475 Volkswagen 

5477 Dupont, Fordham Road 

5478 Machinist for 

Electronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St. at North 

Reading Line 

549 Woburn St. at 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 

Aves. 

551 1 Dymo Graphics Systems 

5512 Photon, Inc. 

5513 D. F. Munroe Paper Co. 
5514Waltham Door& 

Window Co. 

552 Middlesex Ave. & Shady 

Lane Drive 
5521 Mytron Inc. 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 

Oakdale Rd. 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 

Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 

Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 

Lawrence St. 

611 No. Wilmington 

Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave & 

North St. 

613 North St. & 

Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St. & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave. & 

High St. 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds. 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn & Park Sts. 



619 Park St. & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds. 

622 Park St. at No. Reading 

Line 

623 Middlesex Ave. & 

Salem St. 

624 Arlene & Catherine 

Aves. 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 

Aves. 

626 Salem St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 

Streets 

628 Salem St. & 

McDonald Rd. 

629 McDonald Rd. to End 

631 Royal St. 

632 Salem St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 

Streets 

634 Ballardvale St. at 

Rte. 125 

635 Ballardvale St. at 

No. 211 

6351 Charles River Breeding 

6352 Georgia Pacific 

636 Ballardvale St. at 

No. 326 

637 Ballardvale St. at Andover 

Line 

638 Salem St. at Rte. 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts. 

641 Woburn St. & 

Hathaway Rd. 

642 Hawthorne Rd. 

643 Hathaway & 

Pilling Rd. 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 

Roads 

645 Salem St. & Thrush Rd. 

646 Thrush Rd. & 

Marie Drive 

647 Salem St. at North 

Reading Line 
6451 Wilmington Regional 
Health Center 

6471 Cronin's Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Dept.) 

6482 Ainsworth Road 

6483 Highway Dept. 

649 Andover St. & Rte. 125 

651 Andover St. at No. 319 

652 Andover St. at Andover 

Line 

SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a.m. & 

9p.m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 

22 No School (6:30 a.m.. 
7:00 a.m.) 

2 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box - second alarm 

3 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box - general alarm 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 

8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No. Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



: 



FIRE — AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3200 

658-3346 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658-5071 
658-5072 



TOWN HALL 
658-331 1 
935-5596 



TOWN HALL ANNEX 
657-7511 

NO SCHOOL 658-9845 



Serious harm, I am afraid, has been 
wrought to our generation by fostering 
the idea that they would live secure in a 
permanent order of things. They have 
expected stability and have found none 
within themselves or in their universe. 
Before it is too late they must learn and 
teach others that only by brave accep- 
tance of change and all-time crisis-ethics 
can they rise to the heights of superlative 
responsibility. 

HELENKELLER 



7 9' TV 




► 

*> K -